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Coldstream
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DelBoy



Joined: 12 Jul 2007
Posts: 4862
Location: The County of Angus

PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 7:41 pm    Post subject: Pte. Robert Brown Reply with quote

WW1
Brown, Robert. Pte. CAMn H.

(Glasgow Herald 20th April 1915)
"Intimation of the death at the front of Private Robert Brown, Cameron Highlanders, has been received by his parents in Coldstream. Private Brown, who was only 19 years of age, had been in the Army for 18 months."

CWGC
BROWN, R
Rank: Private
Service No: 9550
Date of Death: 12/04/1915
Regiment/Service: Cameron Highlanders 2nd Bn.
Grave Reference: XXIX. B. 20.
Cemetery: CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, SOUCHEZ

SNWM
Surname: BROWN
Firstname: Robert
Service Number: 9550
Date Death: 12/04/1916 (1915)
Place of birth: Coldstream Berwick
Other: 2nd Bn.
SNWM roll: THE QUEEN'S OWN CAMERON HIGHLANDERS
Rank: Pte
Theatre of death: F.& F.
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DelBoy



Joined: 12 Jul 2007
Posts: 4862
Location: The County of Angus

PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2013 2:47 am    Post subject: memorial article Reply with quote

http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/heritage/honouring-our-dead-1-465390

An old news article about the memorial and the problems of adding new names.

THE WAR memorial in the small Borders village of Coldstream stands, like many hundreds of others throughout the United Kingdom and beyond, as a monument of remembrance to the servicemen who left to serve King and country in the World Wars of last century, never to return to their homes and families.

For communities, large and small, the memorials provide an important link to the past, a means of remembering the men and women who grew up locally and who died in action. The lists of names often read like a who’s who of local families. Many of their descendants still live in the town or village and lay wreaths every year at Remembrance Sunday.

The memorials were erected after the massive loss of life during the First World War. Official lists of the dead, mostly provided by individual regiments and collated by the British government, were used as the main reference point for the names to be "honoured in stone".

But as the years have passed the identities of many of the dead have come to light, often "discovered" in remote war cemeteries in countries like France and Belgium or found by chance decades after they fell by the network of activists who strive to ensure that all memorials are complete. As a consequence the addition of names on war memorials seems a never-ending process.

The Coldstream memorial, a stone and brass tribute that stands proudly at the High Street, was unveiled in 1921 by Field Marshal Earl Haig. The Scottish Borders village has the distinction of being the only place in the UK which gives its name to a regiment of the existing regular British Army, has updated its memorial as new names have come to light but now faces a problem. Put simply, there are now too many names and not enough space.

Local historian Will Murray, who has unearthed the details of a number of "forgotten" Coldstream men who died in the 1914-18 conflict, was last year able to persuade the Commonwealth War Graves Commission to add the names of brothers William and Wellwood Johnston to the memorial . The two men, who had lived with their parents on the Hirsel Estate just outside the village, had for some reason "slipped through the net".

Both men died aged 25, Wellwood at the ill-fated Gallipoli campaign of 1915 in Turkey and William two years later at Passchendaele, Belgium. Their parents had erected a small stone in their memory in the nearby Lennel churchyard, it had become covered in moss and was discovered by chance by Murray 10 years ago.

The brothers will fill the last two remaining places on the Coldstream memorial plaque. Ironically William will become the first and only Coldstream Guard on the Coldstream war memorial. Wellwood had served with the King’s Own Scottish Borderers. Both names will be in place in time for this November’s Remembrance Day.

Now, however, the situation has become complicated by the discovery of yet another forgotten hero.

Murray was contacted early this year to be told that, on a headstone in Aubigny Cemetery in France, was etched the name of gunner Robert Elliot. Further investigation revealed that he had died, aged 19, while serving with A Battery, 51st Brigade, the Royal Field Artillery and that his parents were W.M. and I.M. Elliot of Coldstream.

“He must have come from Coldstream when he left to join the army and he should be on the Coldstream memorial but there are no more spaces,” says Murray. "I will have a word with the local council to see if anything can be done but I am sure they would balk at the prospect of further expense. It is a very difficult one, do we do anything in a case like this?"

Neil Griffiths of the Royal British Legion in Scotland said the problem was not confined to Coldstream. Many other communities had faced the same dilemma and even the Scottish National War Museum at Edinburgh Castle, which was dedicated to 100,000 servicemen when it opened in the late 1920s, now honours 148,000.War memorials are very expensive to keep," says Griffiths. "I think communities like Coldstream will have to accept that the list of names on the memorial is an appreciation of all those who died. Not all the names who deserve to be there may appear but there is no way round it, money is not unlimited. It is sad but it is a fact of life.

"We have to get philosophical about it and say that these names represent everyone who died. It is unfortunate but we just cannot keep adding to it," he says.
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kinnethmont



Joined: 19 Dec 2006
Posts: 1663
Location: Aberdeenshire

PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2013 10:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting item. Often men, seeming to be local, were not included for valid reason best known to those involved. No doubt some omissions were made but generally they did their best.
It is now possible to get a fair sized list of casulaties allegedly born at Coldstream, say. Should they all be added? Of course not. The memorial is not a " list " of all those born there as many might have only have lived locally a few months / years of their early life.

Quote:

Local historian Will Murray, who has unearthed the details of a number of "forgotten" Coldstream men who died in the 1914-18 conflict, was last year able to persuade the Commonwealth War Graves Commission to add the names of brothers William and Wellwood Johnston to the memorial .

Not sure why the Scotsman would report this, CWGC would have had no involvement at all in adding these names to a local memorial.

Sadly, Neil Griffiths of RBLS died very recently at an early age. I had dealings with him some years ago and found him well informed on this subject advising caution and research, where others promoted " add the name " . If only some at RBLS had heeded his advice.
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We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

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Merseman



Joined: 07 Aug 2013
Posts: 307
Location: Duns, Berwickshire

PostPosted: Mon Aug 12, 2013 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Scotsman, 14th May 1923

COLDSTREAM WAR MEMORIAL - EARL HAIG ON BORDER COURAGE - The historic township of Coldstream paid its last tribute yesterday to the 70 men from the parish who laid down their lives in the Great War, when Field Marshal Earl Haig of Bemersyde unveiled a beautiful memorial in the form of a pylon, bearing the names of the fallen on bronze tablets and surmounted by the town coat of arms. Combined with the memorial, which is the work of G Washington Browne RSA, Edinburgh, are two beautiful entrance gates and a roadway to the Home Park.

Earl Haig arrived at the Town Hall, where he inspected the guard of honour from the barracks at Berwick, which consisted of long service men from the KOSB Regiment. He afterwards inspected detachments of ex-service men and women drawn up there. The streets were lined by a large gathering of people from the town and district when the public bodies marched in procession from the Town Hall to the memorial, opposite which a guard of honour from the 4th Battalion KOSB was drawn up. The service at the memorial was of an impressive character, the praise being led by the band of the 4th Battalion KOSB, and supported by the combined choirs of the town. The Earl of Home presided...


[Article then continues at - some length - with Earl Haig's comment on the example of self-sacrifice to the living; local Border traditions - such as the Treaty of Birgham, Flodden and the Coldstream Guards - which had again been shown; and the duty on employers to have themselves added to the King's Roll in order to find employment for disabled ex-servicemen].


The Buildings of Scotland - Borders, p188

The burgh's War Memorial, by George Washington Browne, 1922-23. Polished ashlar segmental screen wall with ball-finnialled gatepiers (to Home Park) at the ends and a cenotaph in the centre. It stands beside the former Coldstream West United Free Church.

[Coldstream West UF Church is now St Cuthbert’s Community Centre].
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Merseman



Joined: 07 Aug 2013
Posts: 307
Location: Duns, Berwickshire

PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 5:31 pm    Post subject: Re: memorial article Reply with quote

DelBoy wrote:
http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/heritage/honouring-our-dead-1-465390

An old news article about the memorial and the problems of adding new names.

Local historian Will Murray, who has unearthed the details of a number of "forgotten" Coldstream men who died in the 1914-18 conflict, was last year able to persuade the Commonwealth War Graves Commission to add the names of brothers William and Wellwood Johnston to the memorial . The two men, who had lived with their parents on the Hirsel Estate just outside the village, had for some reason "slipped through the net".

The brothers will fill the last two remaining places on the Coldstream memorial plaque. Ironically William will become the first and only Coldstream Guard on the Coldstream war memorial. Wellwood had served with the King’s Own Scottish Borderers. Both names will be in place in time for this November’s Remembrance Day.

Now, however, the situation has become complicated by the discovery of yet another forgotten hero.

Murray was contacted early this year to be told that, on a headstone in Aubigny Cemetery in France, was etched the name of gunner Robert Elliot. Further investigation revealed that he had died, aged 19, while serving with A Battery, 51st Brigade, the Royal Field Artillery and that his parents were W.M. and I.M. Elliot of Coldstream.

“He must have come from Coldstream when he left to join the army and he should be on the Coldstream memorial but there are no more spaces,” says Murray. "I will have a word with the local council to see if anything can be done but I am sure they would balk at the prospect of further expense. It is a very difficult one, do we do anything in a case like this?"

kinnethmont wrote:
Interesting item. Often men, seeming to be local, were not included for valid reason best known to those involved. No doubt some omissions were made but generally they did their best.
It is now possible to get a fair sized list of casulaties allegedly born at Coldstream, say. Should they all be added? Of course not.

Sadly, Neil Griffiths of RBLS died very recently at an early age. I had dealings with him some years ago and found him well informed on this subject advising caution and research, where others promoted " add the name " . If only some at RBLS had heeded his advice.


What makes it more sobering is the fact that the Johnstone brothers didn't really slip through any net... they are on Preston civic memorial, 12 miles to the north.

Their parents lived at 'The Crooks' down in Coldstream but presumably they'd 'flown the nest'/their parents had moved there from Preston.

Both also on Preston Recreations Rooms tablet & roll.
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Kenneth Morrison



Joined: 29 Sep 2008
Posts: 6053
Location: Rockcliffe Dalbeattie

PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2016 4:20 pm    Post subject: Re: memorial article Reply with quote

Merseman wrote:
DelBoy wrote:
http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/heritage/honouring-our-dead-1-465390

An old news article about the memorial and the problems of adding new names.

Local historian Will Murray, who has unearthed the details of a number of "forgotten" Coldstream men who died in the 1914-18 conflict, was last year able to persuade the Commonwealth War Graves Commission to add the names of brothers William and Wellwood Johnston to the memorial . The two men, who had lived with their parents on the Hirsel Estate just outside the village, had for some reason "slipped through the net".

The brothers will fill the last two remaining places on the Coldstream memorial plaque. Ironically William will become the first and only Coldstream Guard on the Coldstream war memorial. Wellwood had served with the King’s Own Scottish Borderers. Both names will be in place in time for this November’s Remembrance Day.

Now, however, the situation has become complicated by the discovery of yet another forgotten hero.

Murray was contacted early this year to be told that, on a headstone in Aubigny Cemetery in France, was etched the name of gunner Robert Elliot. Further investigation revealed that he had died, aged 19, while serving with A Battery, 51st Brigade, the Royal Field Artillery and that his parents were W.M. and I.M. Elliot of Coldstream.

“He must have come from Coldstream when he left to join the army and he should be on the Coldstream memorial but there are no more spaces,” says Murray. "I will have a word with the local council to see if anything can be done but I am sure they would balk at the prospect of further expense. It is a very difficult one, do we do anything in a case like this?"

kinnethmont wrote:
Interesting item. Often men, seeming to be local, were not included for valid reason best known to those involved. No doubt some omissions were made but generally they did their best.
It is now possible to get a fair sized list of casulaties allegedly born at Coldstream, say. Should they all be added? Of course not.

Sadly, Neil Griffiths of RBLS died very recently at an early age. I had dealings with him some years ago and found him well informed on this subject advising caution and research, where others promoted " add the name " . If only some at RBLS had heeded his advice.


What makes it more sobering is the fact that the Johnstone brothers didn't really slip through any net... they are on Preston civic memorial, 12 miles to the north.

Their parents lived at 'The Crooks' down in Coldstream but presumably they'd 'flown the nest'/their parents had moved there from Preston.

Both also on Preston Recreations Rooms tablet & roll.


The brothers are also named on the Dalbeattie War Memorial in Kirkcudbrightshire and Wellwood is named on the High School Memorial there.
They were the sons of Robert (an estate manager) and Mary Agnes (McKnight) Johnston of Angus Cottage Preston, Duns and of The Crooks, Coldstream, Berwickshire who had married in 1887 at Dalbeattie.

Wellwood Maxwell Johnston – age 25 – Sergeant (4020) 1/4th Battalion (Borders), King's Own Scottish Borderers.
Wellwood was a former pupil of the Dalbeattie Higher Grade Public School. He was a forester, employed by the Earl of Home at Preston, Duns, Berwickshire when he joined the Territorial 4th KOSB in April 1908. He was mobilised in August 1914, promoted to Sergeant in April 1915 and landed with his battalion at Gallipoli in June 1915.
Born 1890 at Harbridge, Ringwood, Hampshire.
Missing in Action on 12 July 1915 and named on the Helles Memorial, Galipoli, Turkey.

and his brother:

William Johnston – age 25 – Lance Sergeant (16242) 3rd Battalion, Coldstream Guards.
William was serving with the Metropolitan Police when he enlisted at Shepherds Bush, London.
Born 1892 at Harbridge, Ringwood, Hampshire.
Missing in Action on 9 October 1917 and named on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.
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stuartn



Joined: 13 Dec 2016
Posts: 2348

PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2018 7:15 am    Post subject: WMR (ex UKNIWM) number Reply with quote

WMR 13330
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Mike Morley



Joined: 17 Apr 2013
Posts: 3121
Location: Roberton, Lanarkshire

PostPosted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: DOUGLAS-HOME, GEORGE COSPATRICK
Initials: GC
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Flying Officer
Service Number: 126996
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Date of Death: 14/6/1943
Additional Information: Son of Charles Archibald Cospatrick Douglas-Home, K.T., 13th Earl of Home, and Lilian, Countess of Home, of Coldstream, Berwickshire, Scotland.
Panel Reference: Panel 2, Column 2
Memorial: Ottowa Memorial.

Also named on Douglas, Lanarkshire War Memorial.
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Kenneth Morrison



Joined: 29 Sep 2008
Posts: 6053
Location: Rockcliffe Dalbeattie

PostPosted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 4:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Evening Dispatch 17/6/1943

Flying Officer G. C. Douglas-Home, son of Lord Home, of Berwickshire; Pilot Officer Charles Sugden, of Bradficld, Yorks,, and two sergeants from New South Wales, A. S. Lynch and E. R. Ritchie, have been missing since early on Monday, when they took off from their base near Victoria, British Columbia, on a routine flight in a twinengined bomber.

Apparently it was a Hampden of No. 32 Operational Training Unit at RCAF Station Patricia Bay, BC. It crashed into sea 20 kilometres off Cape Flattery in bad weather on 14 June 1943.
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