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British Linen Bank

 
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David McNay
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Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 12:22 am    Post subject: British Linen Bank Reply with quote

This memorial is located in what is now the St AndrewsSquare branch of the Bank of Scotland. the British Linen Bank was swallowed up by the Bank of Scotland some years ago.

This is another memorial which I am currently researching, and there's a couple of names not contained on this memorial.

First World War section:



The Second World War names are on panels flanking the First World War section:





Apologies for the quality of these photos but I had to take these photos quickly due to it being a working bank and they were a bit wary of someone taking photos. Luckily I'm a staff member and the man I asked took a keen interest in the banks history.
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Adam Brown
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Location: Edinburgh (From Sutherland)

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 12:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's my feeble attempt at taking this memorial. It is in a very difficult position for photos but this photos shows the location of the two Second World War plaques in relation to the Great War plaque.



Adam
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David McNay
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2007 10:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The memorial is placed in an arched recess in the south wall of the entrance hall of the Head Office of the Bank, St. Andrew Square, Edinburgh. The Roll of Honour is inscribed in incised and gilt lettering on a large panel of green Elterwater stone set within a massive bronze frame, surmounted by a pediment, and crowned and flanked by emblems symbolical of Sacrifice and Remembrance.

The sculptor was Mr. C d’O PILKINGTON JACKSON, and the Architects, Messrs. DICK PEDDIE & WALKER TODD, Edinburgh.
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David McNay
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2007 10:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Information taken from the commemorative booklet:

UNVEILING CEREMONY

On Tuesday, 6th November 1923, the Memorial was unveiled by the Right Hon. THE EARL OF ROSEBERRY, K.G., K.T., Governor of the Bank.

The Right Hon. THE EARL OF HOME, Deputy Governor of the Bank, presided over a representative company, which included, in addition to relatives and friends of those whose names are commemorated, The Right Hon. LORD POLWARTH, C.B.E.; Sir ANDREW N. AGNEW, Bart; Sir JOHN URE PRIMROSE, Bart., L.L.D.; Mr J R M WEDDERBURN, W.S.; Mr R L BARCLAY, C.B.E.; Mr JAMES TUKE; Mr A L McCLURE, K.C.; and Mr M PEARCE CAMPBELL, D.L., Directors of the Bank; also the principal officials at the Head Office, Glasgow and Dundee, members of the general staff, and the Very Rev. A WALLACE WILLIAMSON, C.V.O, D.D., of St Giles’ Cathedral, who conducted the dedicatory service.

The Right Hon. The Earl of Home said they were there to inaugurate a Memorial to their comrades in the service of the Bank who fell in the War. There were seventy-six members of the staff called up as Territorials in 1914. Altogether 589 men served in different parts of the Services, and of these, a large number gained promotion and honours. No fewer than sixty-eight made the supreme sacrifice. Those whom they commemorated endeavoured to fulfil their duties in days of peace, and they nobly responded to the duties that called them in the days of war, and finally in a righteous cause they laid down their lives for the love of their country and their friends. They might be permitted in that place and on that day to send a message of much sympathy to those near and dear who mourned their loss. That message should be of good cheer, for all that they had they gave to save mankind – themselves they scorned to save. Surely great must be their reward. They must try to follow their good example, and show the same cheerfulness in adversity, the same determination and endurance in difficulty and the same self-sacrifice, helpfulness, and comradeship, so that they might carry on their good work, and, bearing each other’s burdens, might try to make a happy world for their children to live in. In conclusion, the Deputy Governor read some lines from a hymn, written by an old friend of his, which, he considered, expressed in beautiful language their feelings in regard to those whom they had lost.

The hymn, which is by Mr J.S. Arkwright, is entitled “The Supreme Sacrifice”, and the verses are as follows:

THE SUPREME SACRIFICE

1.
O Valiant Hearts, who to your glory came,
Through dust of conflict and through battle flame,
Tranquil you lie, your knightly virtue proved,
Your memory hallowed in the Land you loved.

2.
Proudly you gathered, rank on rank to war
As who had heard God’s message from afar,
All you had hoped for, all you had, you gave
To save Mankind- yourselves you scorned to save.

3.
Splendid you passed, the great surrender made,
Into the light that never more shall fade,
Deep your contentment in that blest abode
Who wait the last clear trumpet call of God.

4.
Long years ago as earth lay dark and still,
Rose a loud cry upon a lonely hill,
While in the frailty of our human clay
Christ, our Redeemer, passed the self-same way.

5.
Still stand His Cross from that dread hour to this,
Like some bright star above the dark abyss,
Still, through the veil, the Victor’s pitying eyes
Look down to bless our lesser Calvaries.

6.
These were his servants, in His steps they trod,
Following through death the martyred son of God.
Victor he rose, victorious too shall rise
They who have drunk his cop of Sarcifice.

7.
O risen Lord, O Shepherd of our Dead,
Whose Cross has bought them and whose Staff has led,
In glorious hope their proud and sorrowing Land
Commits her Children to Thy gracious hand.

Mr R G THOMAS, General Manager of the Bank, read the following note, which had been handed to him by Lord Roseberry:

“I am not able to speak to you, so I have asked Mr Thomas to say a few words on my behalf. You see the names inscribed on high. They are not on our ledgers or our profit and loss accounts; but they remain as a rich inheritance for us – an inheritance of hope and glory and patriotism carried to the death, which I trust may animate and inspire us for all time to come.”

Mr Thomas, having read the names inscribed, Lord Roseberry dropped the Union Jack which veiled the Memorial.

Dr. Wallace Williamson offered the Prayer of Dedication and thereafter pronounced the Benediction.

On behalf of the staff, Mr R W Stevenson, Secretary of the Bank, laid a wreath of lilies, heather, and bay leaves at the foot of the memorial.
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David McNay
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2007 10:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some more items of trivia:

To allow the above hymn to be quoted and reproduced in the booklet, the Bank paid the sum of ten shillings and sixpence.

The receipt for this was among many items of correspondence concerning the memorial I was looking through in my visit to the Archives today.

I also found the recipt for the wreath, which was provided by Tait & Francis, of "Tarland", Edinburgh. I wasn't sure how much it cost, but I believe the receipt said £1, 14 shillings. That seems rather a lot for a wreath, so I may not have read it properly.
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Kenneth Morrison



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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2016 3:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

George Watson Geddes – age 23 – Private (40472) 1st Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers.
George was employed in the British Linen Bank in Castle Douglas when he enlisted as Private (4164) in the 9th Royal Scots. He was posted to the Royal Scots in France in September 1916 but was transferred to the 1st KOSB.
Born 1895 at Cockburnspath, Berwickshire. Son of George Watson Geddes and Catherine (Bryden) Geddes of Ramheaugh Cottage, Cockburnspath, Berwickshire.
Missing in Action on 11 April 1918 and named on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium.
Also named on the Castle Douglas War Memorial, on the St. Andrew's Church memorial, now in the Castle Douglas Parish Church and on the Cockburnspath War Memorial, together with his brother Private William Bryden Geddes, who was killed on 11 September 1917.

[is this memorial still in the location detailed above?]
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Kenneth Morrison



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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 5:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A WW2 name from the Dornock Parish War Memorial in Dumfriesshire:

Robert Carthon Patrick Carmont – age 28 – Bombardier (925570) 130 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery.
Robert was a clerk in the Annan branch of the British Linen Bank when he enlisted. He was buried in Sahmaw War Cemetery in Burma (an original 'Chindit' cemetery) but was re-interred in Taukkyan in July 1954.
Born 1916 in Kilmun, Argyllshire. Son of James H. Carmont (writer) and of Eleanor Carmont of Glasgow.
Nephew of Lord Carmont of Edinburgh, of the late Canon Robert Carmont and of Miss Elizabeth Carmont, both of Auchencaer, Eastriggs. Dornock.
Killed in Action on 15 August 1944 and buried in Taukkyan War Cemetery, Mayanmar (Burma)
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Kenneth Morrison



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PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2017 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Named on the Caerlaverock Parish War Memorial in Dumfriesshire as:

WILFRED McILVEAN.

Wilfred Hugh McIlvean – age 22 – Private (34273) 11th Battalion, Royal Scots.
Wilfred served his apprenticeship at the British Linen Bank in Dumfries before moving to be a teller in the Broxburn branch in West Lothian. He then moved to the West End branch in Edinburgh and he enlisted from there in July 1916. He went to France in early 1917.
Born 1894 Caerlaverock. Son of the Rev. Thomas Dale McIlvean, Minister of Caerlaverock, and of Grace Drennan (McGillivray) McIlvean.
Killed in Action on 5 April 1917 and buried in Faubourg d'Amiens Cemetery, Arras, France.
Also named on the Caerlaverock Parish Church memorial.

Wilfred may have been born in Saltcoats, Ardrossan, Ayrshire as his birth was also registered there and SDGW/SNWM has this as his birthplace.
I'm checking
.
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Kenneth Morrison



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PostPosted: Fri Jun 16, 2017 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another WW2 name. This one from the Langholm War Memorial:

Walter Alexander Graham Clark – age 32 – Flight Lieutenant (116802) 156 Squadron, Bomber Command, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.
Walter was educated at Dumfries Academy before he became a clerk with the British Linen Bank in the Borders. He joined the RAF at the outbreak of war as Sergeant (974201) and was promoted to Pilot Officer in January 1942 and to Flight Lieutenant in December. He flew over 30 sorties including one of the first raids on Berlin and latterly he served in a pathfinder Squadron. Walter's Lancaster bomber took off from RAF Warboys in Huntingdonshire for a raid on Berlin but was lost without a trace.
Born 1911 in Langholm, Dumfriesshire. Son of the late David Clark and of Mary Latimer (Cairns) Clark of Roselea, Rosevale Street, Langholm. Husband of Doris Irene (Fuller) Clark of Kilburn, Middlesex who he married in March 1943 in East Ham, London.
Missing in Action on 22 November 1943 and named on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.
Also named on the Newtown St. Boswells War Memorial in Roxburghshire.
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Kenneth Morrison



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PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

WILLIAM WALKER DFC.

Named on the Wigtown War Memorial (so lots of the detail here is from Mike Morley)

Also named on the Ewart High School Memorial in Newton Stewart as:

CAPT. WILLIAM WALKER D.F.C. C.deG. R.A.F.

William Walker, Distinguished Flying Cross and Croix de Guerre (Belgium) – age 24 – Captain, 6 Squadron, Royal Air Force.
William served his apprenticeship at the British Linen Bank in Newton Stewart and was working in Edinburgh when he enlisted as Private (1695) in the 1/4th Battalion (Queen’s Edinburgh Rifles) Royal Scots. He landed with his battalion at Gallipoli in June 1915 and later served in Egypt and Palestine as Private (200278) before he was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant and posted to the Royal Flying Corps in March 1918. He was awarded a Belgian Croix de Guerre as Temp. 2nd Lieut. W. Walker RFC. and a DFC as Lieut. (T./Capt.) William Walker. “On August 9th accurate information as to the whereabouts of our cavalry patrols was urgently required; Captain Walker undertook to obtain this. After patrolling for three hours at a very low altitude, subjected to intense machine-gun fire, he brought back the requisite information. This officer had already completed two previous reconnaissances that day, and on the day before he had flown for six and a half hours engaging enemy aeroplanes and troops. A striking example of courage, endurance and devotion to duty. “
Born 1894 at Croft-an-Righ, Wigtown. Son of the late Alexander Davidson Walker (solicitor) and of the late Ellen (MacLelland) Walker of Wigtown.
He named his brother James of Croft-an-Righ, Wigtown as his next of kin.
Missing in Action on 8 October 1918 and named on the Arras Flying Services Memorial. France.
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Kenneth Morrison



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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 1:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A photo of the memorials and a close up of the WW1 panel are at
http://www.lloydsbankinggroup.com/Our-Group/our-heritage/first-world-war/our-memorials/british-linen-bank-war-memorial/
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Kenneth Morrison



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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JAMES ANDREW RAE.

Named on the Annan War Memorial in Dumfriesshire and on the Annan Academy memorial.

John Andrew Rae – age 19 – Private (37746) 10th Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)
John was educated at Annan Academy and had just completed his apprenticeship at the British Linen Bank in Annan when he enlisted in February 1917. He joined his battalion in France at the beginning of August but was wounded three weeks later and died on a hospital train on his way to hospital in Rouen.
Born 1898 in Annan. Son of Thomas McLean Rae and Charlotte (Bell) Rae of 15 Scott's Street, Annan.
Died of Wounds on 22 August 1917 and buried in St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France.
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Kenneth Morrison



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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 4:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ARTHUR JAMES SCOTT.

Named on the Keir Parish war Memorial in Dumfriesshire as:

ARTHUR JAMES SCOTT.
Arthur James Scott – age 21 – Private (S/10352) 2nd Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
Arthur had served his apprenticeship in the British Linen Bank in Thornhill, Dumfriesshire before taking a post in the Dumfries Branch. He enlisted in early 1916 and had been in France for a month.
Born 1895 in Keir. Son of the late William Scott of Keir Mill and of Isabella (McGregor) Scott of Keir Village.
Missing in Action on 18 August 1916 and named on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme, France.
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