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Biggar, South Lanarkshire
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DerekR
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Joined: 19 Dec 2006
Posts: 2969
Location: Hawick, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 4:59 pm    Post subject: Biggar, South Lanarkshire Reply with quote

Biggar War Memorial

The memorial was funded with public subscription and erected by the local parish.





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DerekR
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Location: Hawick, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote





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spoons



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Location: St John's Town of Dalry

PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 3:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think I was lucky, the memorial seems to have been recently cleaned when I took my pictures.



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Adam Brown
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Location: Edinburgh (From Sutherland)

PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spoons

Unlike it's close neighbour, South Lanarkshire is very good at looking after its memorials.

Adam
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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7636
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2008 9:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The following posts contain photographs and text from the Roll of Honour for Biggar. The scans and transcription are my work, which I'm making available for the members of the forum and other interested parties.

Please note that the scans are my property, and while they are free for anyone, any use of them by another party for any reason requires permission to be sought first.


Last edited by David McNay on Fri Oct 10, 2008 11:42 pm; edited 1 time in total
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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7636
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 12:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: ALLAN, JOHN NELSON
Initials: J N
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Baker
Regiment/Service: Merchant Navy
Unit Text: S.S. Stockport (Grimsby)
Age: 25
Date of Death: 25/02/1943
Additional information: Son of John N. Allan, and of C. Allan, of Biggar, Lanarkshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 101.
Memorial: TOWER HILL MEMORIAL

"John Nelson Allan, son of Mrs Allan, Iona, Rowhead Terrace, was born at Biggar in November, 1917. On leaving Biggar High School he served his apprenticeship as a baker with Mr Gibson, but the call of the sea was in his blood, and in 1937 he joined as a baker in the Merchant Navy. During the war he knew much hardship and danger. He was present with his ship at the evacuation of Dunkirk, and again at the evacuation of Norway and of Greece. At other times he was on the arduous and dangerous run across the North Atlantic, and it was there eventually, on February 25, 1943, in the cold waters off the coast of Newfoundland, that his ship was sunk by enemy action. John was a fine-looking lad, and a good tradesman. His friends remember him for his quiet kindliness and for his fine spirit of adventure and of courage."



Frm U-Boat net here are the details of the sinking.

http://www.uboat.net/allies/merchants/2676.html

Stockport
Type: Steam merchant
Tonnage 1.683 tons
Completed 1911 - Earle´s Shipbuilding & Engineering Co Ltd, Hull
Owner: London & North Eastern Railway Co, London
Homeport: Grimsby
Date of attack: 23 Feb, 1943
Nationality: British

Fate
Sunk by U-604 (Horst Höltring)
Position: 47.22N, 34.10W - Grid BD 4633
Complement: 64 (64 dead - no survivors)
Convoy: ON-166 (straggler)
Route: Greenock (8 Feb) - Clyde (11 Feb) - St. Johns
Cargo: None (Rescue ship)
History: On 22 Oct, 1941, the Stockport became operational as rescue ship, took part in 16 convoys and picked up 413 survivors altogether.

Notes on loss
At 03.12 hours on 23 Feb, 1943, U-604 fired a spread of four torpedoes at the Stockport (Master Thomas Ernest Fea OBE) and scored two hits that caused the ship to sink within three minutes east of Cape Race. The rescue ship fell behind the convoy ON-166 when picking up the survivors from 'Empire Trader' on 22 February. After transferring the men to HMCS 'Dauphin' (K 157), she tried to rejoin the convoy but was torpedoed and lost with all hands.

The U-604 was scuttled on 11 Aug, 1943 in the South Atlantic after being bombed by American aircraft.


For more information about the crew and the loss of the 'Stockport' please see this thread on the Scottish War Graves Project forum

http://scottishwargraves.phpbbweb.com/viewtopic.php?t=563


Last edited by David McNay on Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:49 am; edited 1 time in total
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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7636
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: BARR, JOHN BARCLAY
Initials: J B
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lieut-Commander Surgeon
Regiment/Service: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve
Unit Text: H.M.S. Patroclus.
Age: 30
Date of Death: 03/11/1940
Additional information: Son of John and Elizabeth W. Barr.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 44. Column 2.
Memorial: PORTSMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL



"John Barclay Barr was the eldest of the four sons of the late Mr Barr, school teacher, and senior Bailie of the Town Council, and of Mrs Barr, Homeston, Biggar. He was educated at Biggar high School and Glasgow University, where he graduated in medicine in 1936. Subsequently he was a resident doctor in the Southern General and the David Elder hospital in Glasgow, and then went as a surgeon on ship bound on a voyage to the Far East. Returning to Britain on the outbreak of war he was at once appointed to the Patrolcus, as a Surgeon Lieutenant-Commander, RNVR. Most of his service was spent on patrol in the North Atlantic, and it was out there that he gave his life when the Patrolcus was torpedoed on November 3, 1940. John has left the memory of a fine life. He was so interested in his work and in more than his work, and his diary of his voyage to the East, full of shrewd comments and sound observations, is a delight to read. A fine athlete, he played the game always, and played it well."

Further information, and another photograph, available from the Glasgow University Roll of Honour:

http://www.universitystory.gla.ac.uk/biography/?id=WH0713&type=P


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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7636
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 12:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: BUCHANAN, ROY
Initials: R
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Gunner
Regiment/Service: Royal Artillery
Unit Text: 155 (The Lanarkshire Yeomanry) Field Regt.
Age: 23
Date of Death: 01/01/1944
Service No: 326271
Additional information: Son of John and Isabella Kerr Buchanan, of Biggar, Lanarkshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: VII. F. 27.
Cemetery: SAI WAN WAR CEMETERY



"Roy Buchanan was born on April 27, 1920, and most of his too brief life was spent in this district, first at Biggar School and afterwards as a gardener at Cornhill. Roy was among a number of young men who joined the Lanarkshire Yeomanry, and went on active service at the very beginning of the war. He was trained as a driver-mechanic and was attached to the Royal Artillery. Eventually he sailed with his unit to the Far East, arriving in Malaya in time to take part there in the disastrous struggle with the Japanese. On the collapse of that campaign he became a prisoner of war in the hands of his enemies and endured the rigours of the Japanese camps on the island of Formosa. News of him came but slowly and irregularly to his home at 18 Northcrofts Road, and it was only long afterwards that it was learned that around January 1, 1944, death had come to set him free."


Last edited by David McNay on Fri Oct 10, 2008 8:46 pm; edited 3 times in total
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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7636
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 12:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: GIBSON, WALTER
Initials: W
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Corporal
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force
Unit Text: 211 Sqdn.
Age: 23
Date of Death: 22/01/1944
Service No: 552272
Additional information: Son of Mary J Gibson, of Biggar, Lanarkshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Brit. Sec. N. C. 5.
Cemetery: YOKOHAMA WAR CEMETERY



"Walter Gibson, Wellparkhead, Biggar. Walter was at Biggar High School, where he soon gave evidence of a real talent for sketching. Later on he was to put this to good use in the many characteristic and delightful sketches he has left of his time in the Forces. After serving a short term with Mr J S Dempster, chemist, in Biggar, he joined the photographic section of the RAF, in 1938. He was trained at Farnborough and Abbotsinch, and was then posted to No. 211 Squadron in the Western Desert. He went to Greece in the brief campaign there, and then to Palestine, and later to the Sudan. December 1941 found him in Egypt, and the following month he was on the way to the Far East. He landed in Sumatra shortly after the fall of Singapore, and at the same time as, and onyl 80 miles from, a strong force of Japanese. Our troops were evacuated two days later to Java, where Walter ultimately became a prisoner of war. He stayed there almost a year, being employed in road making, and was then transferred to Japan. He died at Camp 19, Fukuoka, japan, on February 23, 1944, aged 23 years. Though he lies at the far side of the earth, he will long be remembered here for his fine and gentle character, and for those artistic endowments in which he found joy for himself and gave joy to others."


Last edited by David McNay on Fri Oct 10, 2008 8:46 pm; edited 3 times in total
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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7636
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 12:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: GRIEVE, BERTRAM S. W.
Initials: B S W
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Unit Text: 218 Sqdn.
Age: 35
Date of Death: 24/10/1942
Service No: 1125948
Additional information: Husband of Annie Grieve, of Biggar.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. D. Grave 1055.
Cemetery: CAMBUSNETHAN CEMETERY



"Bertram S W Grieve, was born on December 27, 1906, and was killed on October 26, 1942. He was a married man with a young family of two boys and a girl, who came some years ago to Biggar as a chauffeur at Loaningdale. He was called to the forces and joined the RAF, serving latterly as a sergeant in Bomber Command, and taking part in several operations over Germany. In October 1942, his plane set out with its crew of seven and its load of bombs, en route for the coast and enemy country, but unhappily it caught fire on the way and crashed at Brantham, in Suffolk, with the loss of all on board. His body was brought back to Scotland and lies now in the churchyard at Cambusnethan."



Last edited by David McNay on Fri Oct 10, 2008 8:47 pm; edited 3 times in total
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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7636
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 12:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: GUINEY, ROBERT TAIT OLIVER
Initials: R T O
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Trooper
Regiment/Service: Royal Armoured Corps
Unit Text: 1st Lothians and Border Horse
Age: 20
Date of Death: 28/01/1945
Service No: 14365283
Additional information: Son of Daniel and Isabella D. Guiney, of Biggar, Lanarkshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: B. 10.
Cemetery: SITTARD WAR CEMETERY



"Robert Tait Oliver Guiney was the son of Mr and Mrs Guiney, Burnside Terrace. His father was in the Navy in the former war, and father and son were both gunners in this war. Robert was born in 1924, went to Biggar School, and was afterwards apprenticed to Messrs Wilson, bakers, in Biggar. He wasa boy of independant character, friendly and happy with his friends, yet he had his own thoughts and his own ways. fond of music, he played the drums in the "Happy-Go-Lucky" Band, and he also played a little golf and football. The call to join the colours came to him in December 1942, when he went to Bridge of Don Training Centre, aberdee. From there he was posted to the 60th Training Regt., RAC, at Catterick, and he ultimately joined the Lothian and border Horse, 30th Armoured Brigade, at Warminster, in June 1943. Robert landed in France within the first week after D-Day, and took part in the fierce fighting round Caen. He was in the advance through France, across the Seine and the Somme, and into Belgium, Holland and Germany - arduous, exciting and dangerous days. His death came in a battle accident at Stein, in Holland, on January 29, 1945, and he now lies in a carefully tended grave at Sittard, Ophoven, with many another Scots lad of the 52nd Lowland Division."


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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7636
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 12:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: HUGHES, DAVID THOMSON
Initials: D T
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Warrant Officer
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force
Unit Text: 199 Sqdn.
Age: 28
Date of Death: 16/09/1944
Service No: 526346
Additional information: Son of Robert McFarlane Hughes and Helen Thomson Hughes, of West Linton, Peeblesshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 214.
Memorial: RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL



"David Thomson Hughes was the second son of Mr and Mrs Robert Hughes, and he was born on March 7, 1916. On leaving Biggar High School he became an apprentice grocer, but his real interests lay farther afield. His great hobby was wireless, and some years before the war he joined the RAF as a wireless operator. There his eager desires to see the world were realised, for after some home training he was stationed in the Far East, at Singapore, Burma and Ceylon. during the war he served with Bomber Command and was on many operations from his home base in Egypt. It was when on a mission from there that his plane was lost with all the crew on September 15, 1944. David's life was not very long but it was full, and he had already reached the rank of Warrant Officer. He has left the memoray of an eager spirit that had found its true place in the company of the young men of the air."

From lostbombers.co.uk:

Type Stirling
Serial Number LJ536
Squadron 199
X1D EX-P
Operation Mandrel
Date 1 15th September 1944
Date 2 16th September 1944

Further Information

"Serial Range LJ501 - LJ544. 44 Stirling Mk.111. Part of a batch of 175 Short S.29 Stirling Mk.111/1V. LJ440-LJ483; LJ501-LJ544; LJ557-LJ596; LJ611-LJ653; LJ667-LJ670 mixed Mk.111/1V. LJ512 was the Mk.1V prototype; LJ530 was the Mk.V prototype. Delivered by Short Brothers Ltd between Nov43 and Apr44. Contract No.A/C2008. LJ461/475/502/503/532 converted to Mk.1V. Delivered to No.19MU, to No.199 Sqdn 26Apr44. Airborne 2131 15Sep44 from North Creake tasked to provide a Mandrel Screen for the Kiel Main Force. Lost without trace. All are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial. W/O Hughes, the specialist operator, had joined the Regular Air Force in the early 1930's. F/S A.D.Heggison KIA Sgt S.C.Rennie KIA F/S M.Kesselman RCAF KIA F/S L.G.Lamgley RCAF KIA Sgt J.B.Sowden KIA W/O D.T.Hughes KIA Sgt J.D.Campbell RCAF KIA Sgt G.J.Dennison RCAF KIA "


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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7636
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 12:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: JACKSON, JAMES ARCHIBALD
Initials: J A
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Pilot Officer (Air Bomber)
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Age: 21
Date of Death: 08/07/1943
Service No: 139721
Additional information: Son of Thomas and Elizabeth Kellock Jackson, of Biggar.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. A. Grave 310.
Cemetery: BIGGAR (THE CROFTS) CEMETERY



"James Archibald Jackson, elder son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Jackson, Leafield, Edinburgh Road, was born on June 26, 1922. He was full of the spirit of enterprise and adventure, and on leaving school he went into the Merchant Navy. On the outbreak of war, however, he felt the attraction of the Air Force, and at the age of 18 he joined the RAF. After the usual period of home service he went out to South Africa, where he completed his training. For three years he fulfilled his dangerous service unscathed, and attained the rank of Pilot Officer, but eventually he was killed in an air crash in Hants. on Jul 8 1943. His body was brought home and now lies in Biggar kirkyard. James had indeed a keen and vigorous spirit. He excelled in athletics, being a fine footballer and swimmer. One of the last memories he has left is of his tall, upstanding figure at the saluting base in the Wings for Victory Week at Biggar in May 1943."


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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7636
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 12:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: KELLY, JOHN MACKAY
Initials: J M
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lance Bombardier
Regiment/Service: Royal Artillery
Unit Text: 155 (The Lanarkshire Yeomanry) Field Regt.
Age: 20
Date of Death: between 10/02/1942 and 13/02/1942
Service No: 326276
Additional information: Son of William George and Helen Kelly, of Biggar, Lanarkshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Column 38.
Memorial: SINGAPORE MEMORIAL



"John Mackay Kelly, son of Mr and Mrs Kelly, of 1 Knocklea, was born in Biggar, educated at Biggar School, and at the outbreak of the war he was engaged wit Messrs Ross, joiners, at the head of the town. Like his friend Ian Scott, John joined the Lanarkshire Yeomanry in April 1939 and, when mobilised, went to Haddington for training. The Yeomanry were ultimately made into an artillery unit, and left for India in May 1941, going on to Malaya in August of that same year. John was attached to the unit HQ and found himself right up at the borders of Siam when the Japanese made their attack. He was through much jungle fighting and it was outside Ne Soon village that he was finally caught in an ambush. The boys were travelling in a truck and leapt out to take cover among the rubber trees to return the enemy fire. John was hit and instantly killed. This was on February 13, 1942. He will be remembered as a fine, upstanding lad, excelling in running and jumping, and many were the prizes he won at the YMCA and Gala Day sports. He was only 20 years old when he was killed."


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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7636
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 12:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: LAWSON, HENRY FAIRLEY
Initials: H F
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Gunner
Regiment/Service: Royal Artillery
Unit Text: 626 Regt.
Age: 40
Date of Death: 28/07/1945
Service No: 1823399
Additional information: Son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Lawson, of Biggar Lanarkshire; husband of M. K. Lawson, of Biggar.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: 59. E. 12.
Cemetery: REICHSWALD FOREST WAR CEMETERY



"Henry Fairley Lawson was born in Biggar in March 1905 and so was rather older than many who went from the town into the services, and he has left a wife and four sons in his home at Northcrofts. Henry was employed ever since his school days in the postal service, and was a familiar and well-liked figure in the town and surrounding district. on joining the Forces he was put into the postal department, where he continued to serve for 4 and a half years, partly in this country and partly on the continent, where he accompanied the Army in its long battle towards Germany. Victory had been won, the fighting had ceased and it seemed that he would soon be safely home again with his wife and children, when on July 26, 1945, he was killed in an accident on the German frontier. He is buried now near Cleve. A man of quietness and simple pleasures, the confusion of war and the separation from his family must have been a great trial to him, but he did not complain, and he gave his service with the same quiet faithfulness that characterized his daily round at home."


Last edited by David McNay on Fri Oct 10, 2008 8:58 pm; edited 2 times in total
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