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St. Ninian's Episcopal Church WW1

 
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jrah60



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 5:52 pm    Post subject: St. Ninian's Episcopal Church WW1 Reply with quote

St. Ninian’s Episcopal Church, 1 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PF

OS Grid Ref: NS 581630

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jrah60



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN GATEFUL MEMORY OF THE MEN FROM THIS CHURCH
WHO SERVED IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES DURING THE GREAT WAR 1914 -1919
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jrah60



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 5:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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jrah60



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

X William S. Bowden
X W.H. Holmes
X Alan Hulley
X Reginald Ireland
X J.R. Cruickshank
X Ernest Murray
X William K.C. Ogg
X John Owen
X Frederick C. Palmer
X David Ross
X Stanley Steven
X J.S. Stirling-Stuart
X W. Surtees
X Charles H. Tucker
X Geo. Bruce Walker

X Killed in Action or Died on Service

LAUS DEO
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jrah60



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The following is extracted from the St. Ninian’s Book of Remembrance

William S. Bowden (c. 1883-1917)
William Bowden was a Slater’s apprentice. In 1901 he was living with his parents Joseph (a printer compositor) and Agnes at 35, Warwick Street, in the Gorbals; they later moved to 81 Abbotsford Place at Eglinton Toll.
William became a Private in the 14th King’s Hussars, a cavalry regiment that took part in operations against Turkish forces in the First World War. In 1915 it was involved in action at Tubal, and in March 1917 in the taking of Baghdad after which the chief Turkish stronghold at Ramadi on the Euphrates was taken. After Ramadi the Regiment became involved in reconnaissance and patrolling duties until 1918 when they were attached to a column that operated inside Persia. William Bowden was killed on 31st August 1917 and is buried in Baghdad North gate War Cemetery.

John Richard Cruickshank (c. 1887-1918)
The 1891 census lists John’s parents Richard D. and Eliza D. Cruickshank as living at 163 East Prince’s street, Helensburgh. Eliza is recorded as “Ten Plunter wife”; this is presumably means she was the wife of a tea planter. Richard D. may have owned a tea plantation in India, hence his absence from the census. There is no record of the family in the 1901 census; perhaps they were away staying at the plantation. John married Daisy Tyson Cruickshank, and they lived in Glasgow at 184 Battlefield Road, Langside. He fought on the western Front with the 1st/6th (Banff and Donside) Battalion, Gordon Highlanders; he was killed on 23 July 1918 and was buried in Marfaux British Cemetery.

William Henry Holmes (2nd June 1882-15th December 1917)
The 1901 census lists the Holmes family at 174 Calder Street with Agnes at the head of the family, described as “living on her own means”. She was originally from Glasgow, but her seven children were born in Bowmore on the island of Islay. Bowmore is the home of a famous single malt whisky, and it may be no coincidence that her son John was a “spirit salesman”. Of the three of her sons listed on the St. Ninian’s memorial, in 1901 George was a Law clerk, William 9confirmed at St. Ninian’s in 1904) a “clerk in bonded store”, while Islay (confirmed in 1906) was still at school (the census lists his name as “Hay” Holmes, the scribe not perhaps realising that he was named after his place of birth).
By 1915 the family had moved to 86 Dundrennan Road, Langside. By this time George had become a Newspaper Reporter and signed up as a gunner in the Royal Garrison Artillery (R.G.A.), serving with them in France. His Military Record shows that he was the victim of a gas attack and was registered at a hospital in Rouen. In 1919 he was discharged with a pension of 12/- (to be reviewed after 12 months) suffering from Gas Poisoning and Pneumonia, his degree of disablement declared to be 30%.
William was a vestry member at St. Ninian’s, who became a Second Lieutenant in the Seaforth Highlanders. He was killed in action at Gouzeaucourt in France, where he was buried.

Alan Hulley
All that we know for certain about Alan Hulley is that he was killed during the First World War. A George Alan W. Hulley is listed in the 1901 English census. He was born in Liverpool in 1898, and records show that he was killed in 1917 whilst serving in the King’s Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). However his residence is listed as Durham so there is nothing to connect him with Glasgow or St. Ninian’s.

Reginald Pearse Ireland (Born c. 1898)
The Ireland brothers were born in Swindon, Wilshire, the sons of Mary and Mark Frederick Ireland (a gas fitter). The family are listed in Swindon in the 1901 census but later moved to 51 Inglefield Street, Govanhill, presumably to live near their relatives Thomas and Mary Ireland who lived at number 48. Reginald fought with the 10th Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (Princess Louise’s Regiment). He was killed in action on 2nd October 1918, a few weeks before the end of the War, and is buried at Bellicourt British Cemetery in France.
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jrah60



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ernest Murray (c. 1899-1918)
The Murray’s father Arthur was born in England and by 1901 was a “Fancy Goods Merchant” (& later a J.P.) living at 1 Millbrae Crescent (perhaps the house called “Dunmurry, Cathcart”). From June 1915 Gordon Buchanan Murray served in the Balkans with the 1/5th Royal Scots Fusiliers, presumably at Gallipoli. Initially he was a 2nd Lieutenant and then became an acting Captain; as in the Western Front, there was a shortage of officers due to the heavy losses in the campaign in the Dardenelles. Ernest served in the 29th Battalion of the Machine Gun Corps in Belgium, where he died on September 4th 1918, a few weeks before the end of the War. His name is recorded along with more than 11,000 others on the Ploegstreet Memorial to those killed in the surrounding area with no known grave.

William Kelly Carmichael Ogg (c. 1898-1916)
Robert Allan Ogg was a warehouseman who became chairman of Copland & Lye, a well-known department store in Glasgow. He was also one of the founders of St. Ninian’s and is commemorated in the main West Window. He married Helen Duff Kelly in 1858 and they lived at 71 Millbrae Road, Langside. They apparently had 11 children. The Oggs on the memorial include two of Robert Allan’s sons, Charles F. and James W. Ogg, who due to their age seemingly served with the Labour Corps; and four of his grandsons, George, William, Archibald and Robert Allan Ogg. The latter two were sons of the elder Robert Allan’s son and namesake, and lived at 192 Nithsdale Road. So it is the third generation Robert Allan who is commemorated on the memorial; he became a Captain in the Highland Light Infantry. His brother Archibald probably served with the Gordon highlanders.
William Ogg was in the 9th H.L.I. along with his brother and became a 2nd Lieutenant. He died on the Somme on the 15th July 1916 at the age of 18 and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, created after the war as a “Memorial to the Missing” to remember those who died in the Somme sector.

John William Owen (c. 1899-1918)
In 1901 the Owens lived at 12 Buccleuch Street (near the new Glasgow School of Art, then under construction). Their parents were Margaret and George William Owen, a manager in the spirit trade. George Robert was confirmed at St. Ninian’s in 1915 by which time the family had moved to 11 Regent Park Terrace, Strathbungo (this may be the residence called “Clennard”, High Shawlands in the CWGC records). He seems to have served with the Queen’s Own Regiment, The Glasgow Yeomanry.
John’s birthplace was Pollokshaws. He was killed just three weeks before the end of the War, and was buried at Dunhallow A.D.S. Cemetery, Ypres. He is commemorated in a poignant inscription on the Sedilia (Priest’s Chair) to the right of the alter at St. Ninian’s:
IN LOVING MEMORY OF
JOHN W. OWEN 9TH BATTALION ROYAL INNISKILLING FUSILIERS
DIED OF WOUNDS RECEIVED IN ACTION 17TH OCTOBER 1918
AGED 19 YEARS A CHOIR BOY OF THIS CHURCH
GIFTED BY HIS PARENTS

Frederick Charles Palmer (1888-1917)
Originally from Bath, Cyril and Frederick Palmer were the sons of Mary and Frederick Palmer (a Tailor), and in 1901 lived at 103 Minard Road. They later moved to 51 Inglefield street, Govanhill (also the address of the Ireland family above). Cyril married Agnes Ferlie Vynne at St. Ninian’s in 1927.
Frederick was confirmed in 1906. During the war he served with the Army Service Corps in the 686th Mechanical Transport Company, attached to the 4th Australian Depot Supply Column. He died on 21st October 1917, and was buried at Ypres Reservoir Cemetery, Belgium. A commemorative plaque at St. Ninian’s reads:

To The Glory of God in Loving Remembrance of
Frederick Charles Palmer, born at Bath 4th Oct. 1888
Fell in Action at Ypres 21st Oct 1917

“Fight the Good Fight”

David Ross
David Ross was another member of St. Ninian’s congregation who did not return from his military service during the First World War. He very likely one of four David Ross’s from Glasgow listed by the GWGC; but we have no way of knowing for certain which one he was.
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jrah60



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Stanley Watson Ferguson Steven (1896-1915)
Edwin and Stanley were the sons of Grace W and Alex F. Steven, a “commission agent”, and lived at Camphill Avenue. There is a medal roll for an Edwin Steven who was a Sergeant with the Kings Own Scottish Borderers (Reg. No: 30779).
Before the War Stanley Steven worked for Geddes and Co., an oil merchant. He then served with the Highland Light Infantry, and then the Army Cyclist Corps, in the 52nd Lowland Division Cyclist Company. He died on 1 2th November 1915 in Lemnos Hospital in the Dardanelles, and was buried at Portianos Military Cemetery in Greece. He was 19 at the time of his death, by which time his parents were living at 43, Queen Square.

James S. Stirling-Stuart (1891-1914)
Douglas and James Stirling-Stuart were the Sons of William Crawfurd Stirling-Stuart (1854-1938) the last Laird of Castlemilk, and also a solicitor and Doctor of Law. The family home was Castlemilk House, a manor house demolished in 1969.
On 22nd September 1915 Douglas enlisted as a Lieutenant, then a Captain with the 2’ Dragoons, Royal Scots Greys, the last Scottish cavalry regiment; by this time his address was in England, at Eastington House, a Manor I-louse in Cirencester. Later in life he had a daughter, Valerie, and lived at Cowbridge Lodge, Malmesbury, Wiltshire. James Stirling-Stuart fought with the 1st Battalion Scots Guards, which left England in August 1914 as part of the original British Expeditionary Force, and took part in the desperate defensive battles of the first months of the war. James died after leading an attack on a German machine gun position at the First Battle of Ypres on 9th November 1914.He was 23 years old. His medal roll notes that his father applied for the 1914 Star for the services rendered by his son, the late James Stirling-Stuart”. His body was never found; his name is recorded at Ypres on the Menin Gate Memorial, and commemorated on a stained glass window in Carmunnock Church, where the Stirling-Stuart family has vault. His father also paid for the War Memorial in the village. The list of the dead, headed by James, and the memorial incorporates a metal horse’s feeding bowl, his love of horses.

William Surtees (c. 1890-1918)
William was the son of William and Alice Surtees of 289 Allison Street; they later moved to 11 Kingsley Avenue, Crosshill.
William was confirmed in 1908 when he was sixteen; he initially joined the 2nd/6th Battalion of the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) and was then transferred to the Labour Corps. He died on the 13th April 1918 and was buried at Potijze Chateau lawn cemetery. The cemetery is located to the north-east of the town of Iper (Ypres) in Belgium. Potijze was within the Allied lines during practically the whole of the First World War and subject to incessant shellfire. Potijze Chateau Lawn Cemetery was used from May to December 1915, July 1917 and October 1918.

Charles H. Tucker (Born c. 1882)
The Tucker family appears to have come originally from Southbourn in Hampshire. and by 1897 were living at a house called ‘Davos’ in Pollokshaws; by 1901 they had moved to 64
Albert Drive, where Charles’ father Henry, is listed as an ‘aerated water manufacturer.
Charles himself was an Insurance Clerk. By the time of the First World War, he was living in Leeds, and had married Rosa Isabel Tucker. He joined The Prince of Wales’s Own (West
Yorkshire Regiment becoming an Acting Corporal in the 9th (service) Battalion. He died on 28th December 1916 whilst serving in the Somme. and was buried in Hamel Cemetery,
4 miles north of the town of Albert.

George Robert Bruce Walker (1893-1919)
George Walker was the Son of George J. Walker (a chartered accountant) and his wife Helen, who lived at a house called “Rochdand” in Cathcart. He was baptised and confirmed at St. Ninian’s. At the time of George’s death in 1919 his parents had moved, presumably to spend their retirement, to a house called “Elmtree”, in Helensburgh.
George served in ‘D’ company in the 17th H.L.I., and then in the Royal Flying Corps. From his headstone we know that he was involved in a flying accident in 1917, and died of his injuries over two years later. It bears with some poignancy the motto of the R.F.C., which by then was the R.A.F.: “Per Ardua ad Astra”: ‘Through struggle to the stars’. He was buried in Cathcart cemetery, the only one of St. Ninian’s First World War dead to have been laid to rest in his homeland.
George’s father died in 1929, and his mother died on Christmas day.

John
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Adam Brown
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 11:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I notice this

John William Owen (c. 1899-1918)
....He is commemorated in a poignant inscription on the Sedilia (Priest’s Chair) to the right of the alter at St. Ninian’s:
IN LOVING MEMORY OF
JOHN W. OWEN 9TH BATTALION ROYAL INNISKILLING FUSILIERS
DIED OF WOUNDS RECEIVED IN ACTION 17TH OCTOBER 1918
AGED 19 YEARS A CHOIR BOY OF THIS CHURCH
GIFTED BY HIS PARENTS

Is this chair still next to that altar?

Adam
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Kenneth Morrison



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 20, 2015 4:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think William Surtees has been mis-identified on the church notes.

SURTEES, WILLIAM.
Rank:Lieutenant
Date of Death:04/04/1918
Age:28
Regiment/Service:Australian Machine Gun Corps 11th Coy.
Grave Reference:A. 3.
Cemetery:BONNAY COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION
Additional Information:Son of William and Alice Surtees, of 11, Kingsley Avenue, Crosshill, Glasgow, Scotland. Native of Sunderland, England.

The AIF Project records https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=292423
show that he was educated at Queen's Park Higher Grade School in Glasgow and that he served with the Royal Field Artillery Territorial Force in Glasgow.
He was born in Sunderland which explains why he attended this church.

His name appears on the Glasgow Roll of Honour as
SURTEES William, 2nd Lieutenant Australian Imperial Force, 11 Kingsley Avenue.
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Ken
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