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IanA



Joined: 19 Dec 2006
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 2014 1:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

William Somerville McLaren

William S McLaren, born on 2/8/1898, was still at school when war broke out. He joined up as soon as he was able, in December 1916, in the King's Own Scottish Borderers (28021) as a private (although having served in the Officers' Training Corps) but very soon (12/4/17) became a cadet pilot in the RFC. He trained on Bristol fighters, one of the most successful aircraft of the war, from 4/9/17 and joined 48 squadron on 22/9/17. One combat report by McLaren survives: it was made on 24/10/17 after an offensive patrol at 7,000 feet over Dixmude. Six German Albatross scouts were seen and McLaren fired at one at a range of about 100 yards. It immediately zoomed East and fled. On 28/10/17 McLaren and his observer David Whyte Hardie landed on bad ground and overturned their Bristol fighter (A7219) which was a total wreck. They both survived and were flying another Bristol (A7282) over Dixmude when they were shot down in flames on 18/11/17. Hardie appears to have been killed (buried Steenkerke Belgian Military Cemetery) while McLaren must have landed under control but died of his wounds a day later.

He was buried at Zuydcoote Military Cemetery and is commemorated on the memorials at Causewayhead & Cambuskenneth and Edinburgh Academy.

He was the son of Duncan McLaren, Fairnington. In the 1911 census, the McLarens were living at Easter Cornton Farm, Logie. Duncan, aged 50, a widower, was head of the family and a farmer. James (15) and William S. (12) were the only children. Jane Dewar (81), grandmother to the boys and John Somerville (1) nephew to Duncan, were also living with them. Duncan became the tenant of Fairnington House and Farm between 1915 and 1920 and died in 1927, aged 66 in Roxburgh.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 2014 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

James McLaren

Captain McLaren served with the 7th Battalion Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders. He was born on 28/10/1895 at Cornton West, Stirling, and educated at Edinburgh Academy. On the outbreak of war, he was commissioned on 5/10/1914. He was gassed near Ypres on 25/5/1915 and repatriated on 2/6/1915. He was killed, just three days after his brother, when leading B company in an attack, supported by tanks, on Fontaine-Notre-Dame, part of the Battle of Cambrai, on 21/11/17. He left £198-4-11 in his will. He is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial and also on the memorials at Causewayhead & Cambuskenneth and the Edinburgh Academy.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 2014 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

William Ewart

Lieutenant Ewart served with the 9th Battalion Fife & Forfar Yeomanry. He was born on 5/11/1882 at 1, Dundas Street, Edinburgh, the son of James (a builder) and Eliza Agnes Ewart (maiden name: Grieve) who became tenants at Cairnmount, Roxburgh between 1911 and 1915. He was educated at the Edinburgh Institution which later became Stewart's Melville College.

He was abroad when the war began and there is a record of William Grieve Ewart, a farmer, (32) arriving from Montevideo on 2/11/15. He was commissioned in December, 1915, giving his address as 4, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. Initially serving with the Fife and Forfar Yeomanry, he was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps, and the London Gazette for 9.10.17 posts Ewart seconded for duty with the XIX Corps Lewis Gun School on 6.7.17. The next mention in the Gazette on 26.10.17 reveals him promoted to Lieutenant and confirms him as instructor in the Lewis Gun School attached to XIX Corps. On the 21/3/1918 the Germans attempted to break the line between British and French forces by a truly massive bombardment with high explosive and gas shells followed by an onslaught of stormtroopers. This was called the Kaiserschlacht or 'Emperor's Battle'. The thinned-out forces in that sector gave way but, crucially, did not break. Anyone who could hold a rifle - including cooks and sanitary men - was sent to try to repel the attack, and included in an ad hoc formation called 'Carey's Force' were the staff from the machine gun school. Ewart was killed one week into the retreat, on the 30th March aged 34, but the German forces were contained. He left £350-15-7 in his will. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 2014 1:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thomas Biggar M.M.

Sergeant Biggar, 40126, served with the 12th Battalion Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). He was awarded the Military Medal. He died on 15/7/18 aged 21 and is buried in Le Peuplier Military Cemetery, Caestre. He was the son of Robert (tailor) and Jane Biggar, Heiton. Writing to his parents, Captain J.B. Brown says: "I hope it will be some consolation to you to know that he died instantaneously, being shot through the heart....I am very greatly distressed to lose your son, because he was not only invariably cheerful - he was very popular in the company - but was, both in and out of the line, a most reliable non commissioned officer. I looked upon him as one of my best, and he had done splendid work." Second Lieut. W.W. Eglinton, in charge of the platoon, writes: "He showed splendid courage, and was at all times a fine example to the men under him. He was buried on the 17th inst., in a little cemetery behind the lines with full military honours, and the men in the platoon unite with me in sending you heartfelt sympathy in the irreparable loss you have sustained.....He was a fine soldier, and this is admitted by all his comrades."
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IanA



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 2014 1:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Arthur D. Kerss

Private Kerss, 447996, served in the 44th Battalion Canadian Infantry. He died on 3/9/18, aged 31 and is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial. He was born in Roxburgh and was the son of James Kerss (gamekeeper) of Feinze Cottage No.1, Sunlaws. He was a carpenter and joined up on 9/11/15. In the 1911 census, he is shown aged 23, living on Sunlaws Estate, joiner. His parents are commemorated by a stone in the kirkyard.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 2014 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

James Queenan M.M.

Lance corporal Queenan, 40059, served in the 2nd Battalion King's Own Scottish Borderers and died on 18/9/18. On that day, two companies of the Borderers were attacking a position called African Trench, near Gouzeaucourt but, as soon as the advance started, the men were raked by machine gun fire which knocked out all of the officers and many of the men. He is buried in Gouzeaucourt Military Cemetery, France. He was born in Roxburgh and lived at Rutherford Burnside in 1901 His father was a ploughman.


Last edited by IanA on Fri Feb 21, 2014 3:17 pm; edited 1 time in total
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IanA



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 2014 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alexander Mabon

Private Mabon, 41659, served with the 5/6th Scottish Rifles. He was listed in the Scotsman as having been wounded on 2/11/1917. He died on 24.2.19. and is buried in Coldingham Churchyard. There are grounds for suspecting that Mabon was a victim of the great influenza epidemic. He is also commemorated on the Coldingham war memorial.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 2014 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

War Memorials - Roxburgh (Kelso Chronicle)

A public meeting was held in the Schoolroom on Tuesday evening to decide as to what steps should be taken to provide a war memorial for the parish.

Rev. Dr Mathers, who presided, stated the object of the meeting, and said that the original idea was to have a tablet in the church, but since then he had heard that there was a strong division of opinion, and the Ladies' Committee had suggested holding a public meeting. Miss Ethel Bywater had just informed him that the amount collected in the parish was £127 17s. (Applause.)

Mr Robert Campbell, Heiton, suggested that the memorial should be placed outside the churchyard amongst the laurels, and this idea was supported by Mr C.D. Mein (Roxburgh Barns), Mrs Stenhouse, and Miss Ethel Bywater.
Mr Campbell suggested that it should take the form of an obelisk, but Mr Mein indicated a preference for a Celtic or Runic cross. This, however, was left to the committee for final settlement.


Miss Davidson, Heiton, asked if the names of the fallen were to be inscribed on the memorial, but the Chairman indicated that this was also a matter for the committee.

The following committee was then appointed:- Mr Henry Rutherfurd of Fairnington; Mr W.H. Thomson, Over Roxburgh; Mr Duncan M'Laren, Fairnington; Mr Robert Hogarth, Heiton Mill; Mr Robert Campbell, Heiton; Miss E. Bywater, Innescote; and Miss Davidson, Heiton, with power to add to their number.

The meeting concluded with a vote of thanks to the Chairman, moved by Mr W.H. Thomson.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 2014 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Duke of Roxburghe at Roxburgh 24.9.1920 (Kelso Chronicle)

The parish of Roxburgh, in common with others, paid a heavy toll in the recent war, and, also like others, it was thought only right and proper that some fitting memorial should be erected to perpetuate the memory of those who had fallen in the cause of freedom. For this purpose a representative committee was appointed, with Miss Davidson, Heiton, as secretary, and subscriptions were readily obtained, as was only to be expected for so worthy an object.

A fitting culmination to the committee's efforts was reached on Sunday, when a handsome Ionic cross of grey Aberdeen granite, standing 13 feet high, was unveiled and dedicated after an appropriate service in the Parish Church. The cross, which stands in a prominent position outside the churchyard, was designed and erected by Messrs J.R. & W. Campbell, builders, Kelso, who deserve great credit for their work. It bears the following inscription:- "To those of the Parish of Roxburgh who gave their lives for their country in the Great War, 1914-19." Then follow the names of 15 men belonging to the parish who made the supreme sacrifice:- Pte. Peter Reid, K.O.S.B., April 25, 1915; Pte. Thomas B. Fairbairn, Seaforth Highlanders, May 9, 1915; Pte. Peter Armstrong, Cameron Highlanders, Sept. 26, 1915; Pte. Robert J. Alexander, Post Office Rifles, May 21, 1916; L-Corpl Charles Reid, K.O.S.B., Sept. 26, 1916; Corpl. Robert S. Wilson, K.O.S.B., April 9, 1917; Pte. George Anderson, Royal Scots, Sept. 8, 1917; L-Corpl. Andrew Fortune, K.O.S.B., Oct. 4, 1917; 2d Lieut. William S. M'Laren, R.F.C., Nov. 18, 1917; Capt. James M'Laren, Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, Nov. 21, 1917; Lieut. William G. Ewart, Fife and Forfar Yeomanry, March 30, 1918; Sergt. Thomas Biggar, M.M., Royal Scots, July 15, 1918; Pte. Arthur D. Kerss, Canadian Light Infantry, Sept. 3, 1918; L-Corpl. James Queenan, M.M., K.O.S.B., Sept. 18, 1918; Pte. Alex. Mabon, Scottish Rifles, Feb. 24, 1919.

Heavy rain had fallen overnight between Saturday and Sunday, but fortunately the weather cleared, and when the hour arrived for the service in the Parish Church the sun was shining brightly. There was a very large congregation, and the service - a deeply impressive one throughout - was conducted by Rev. Dr Mathers, the esteemed minister of the parish. While the congregation was gathering the organist (Mr W.G. Rodgers, Kelso) gave fine renderings of "They that through much tribulation" (from Mendelssohn's "Lauda Sion") and Spohr's "Blest are the departed."
After the singing of the 100th Psalm, Dr Mathers offered up an impressive prayer of confession and supplication, which contained the following reference to those who had fallen:- "Strengthen us, we pray Thee, as we commemorate on this day those whom we have known who have been faithful unto death, and grant us in Thy grace that, as we enter into their labours, and find our blessedness in this life through their blood, we may be Thine in all assurance and fidelity both for this life and for the life that is to come, through Jesus Christ our Lord."

The Paraphrase "How bright these glorious spirits shine" was next sung, and appropriate Scripture lessons were read by Dr Mathers - the hymn "Soldiers of Christ, arise" being sung mid-way - who also offered a prayer of intercession and thanksgiving, concluding with the following passage:- " O Almighty God, Who art a strong tower of defence unto Thy servants against the face of their enemies, we yield Thee praise and thanksgiving for our deliverance from those great and apparent dangers wherewith we were encompassed. We think of those who suffered for us in the agonies of war; we pray for those who with heavy and broken hearts mourn their beloved dead. We acknowledge it to be of Thy goodness that we were not delivered over as a prey to our foes, and we beseech Thee still to continue Thy mercies towards us, that all the world may know that Thou art our Saviour and mighty Deliverer, through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with Thee, O Father, in the unity of the Holy Ghost, world without end. Amen."

The hymn, "For all the saints" was then sung, and, after the Lord's Prayer, Dr Mathers preached from St John xv. 12, 13 - "This is my commandment, that ye love one another, as I have loved you." In the course of his sermon Dr Mathers said - This parish of Roxburgh is to be asked (after our service here in church is ended) to inaugurate the memorial which has been erected by public subscription to the memory of those from this parish who were faithful unto death, and leave us the heritage of an honoured death where their bodies lie far from the country of their birth, and it is in the words of our text that I find the teaching for us Christians met here as the followers of Jesus today. This parish has done what it can that the names of those who have sealed their devotion with their blood should be held in everlasting remembrance and honour. Let the special work of this quiet Sabbath hour be the interpretation for our Christian life of the mute appeal of the stone. Dr Mathers went on to point out that the glory and truth of our religion was that it was the religion of love, and that it was Jesus Himself who consecrated for ever the love that conquered through death. Proceeding, he drew a comparison between the soldier and the martyr, and asked if it was any wonder that St Paul depicted the Christian as the soldier of God, and that our most glorious hymns were the hymns of the warfare of the kingdom of God. Speaking of those to whose memory the cross was erected, the preacher said that they died that we might live in peace; they died that their country might remain free; they died in the struggle (as they and we believed and believe) that the things which have God and Jesus behind them should be triumphant in the world. In conclusion, Dr Mathers said - The dead we honour today laid down their lives to save us from the German foes and enemies of our peace. Jesus laid down His life to save us from the foes and enemies of all that is for peace for our souls and of all that is for peace eternal.
"O God of Bethel" was the concluding item of praise, and, after the benediction, the congregation upstood while Mr Rodgers effectively played the "Dead March" in "Saul" - Handel's glorious masterpiece.
The local company of Girl Guides, under the supervision of Miss E. Bywater, occupied seats facing the pulpit.

Those in attendance then made their way to the spot where the war memorial is erected, where a guard of honour, consisting of returned soldiers belonging to the parish, was lined up, these being under the command of Lieut. Donald, who was accompanied by Capt. T. Black, Kelso, and Lieut. Scarth. Others within the railed-off enclosure were the Duke of Roxburghe, K.T. (Lord Lieutenant of Roxburghshire), and the Duchess of Roxburghe, General R. Scott-Kerr of Sunlaws, Provost Stevenson (Kelso), Mr Henry Rutherfurd of Fairnington, Miss Davidson (Heiton), Miss E. Bywater, and Rev. Dr Mathers.

Rev. Dr Mathers opened the proceedings with a dedicatory prayer in the following terms:- "O God, whose name is called by the name of the Lord of Hosts that dwelleth between the cherubim, grant unto us, we pray Thee, that, as we now dedicate unto Thee for an everlasting remembrance this memorial of those from this parish of Roxburgh who sealed their devotion to their country with their blood, we, for whom they fought, and for whom they conquered in their death, may dedicate ourselves anew unto Thee for all that is for righteousness and for the enduring glory of life. We bring to Thee our fervent thanksgiving for every faithful life, and we ask that through Thy Spirit the memory of these Thy faithful ones, by whose sacrifice peace was again restored to our beloved land, may rouse us, to whom Thou hast continued life on earth, that we may live more worthy of Thy great goodness unto us. Hasten the time, in accordance with Thy holy will, for which Thy servants laboured even through the sufferings of war, and give us grace, we beseech Thee, to enter into their labours, when the nations of the world will no longer strive and destroy, and shall not learn war any more; and when the peaceful kingdom of Thy righteousness shall be established from sea to sea, even unto the ends of the earth. Grant this, O God, for Jesus Christ's sake. Amen."

The Duke of Roxburghe, who was in uniform, then stepped forward to unveil the memorial, which had meanwhile been draped with the Union Jack. He was, he said, grateful for the opportunity and privilege to unveil the memorial, for on it was the name of at least one of his employees, and also the names of many who were employed by his own tenantry. These memorials were invariably accompanied by a tone of sadness, but there should also be the thought of duty well done, sacrifice nobly faced, and suffering calmly endured. He hoped that succeeding generations would look on it in that light, so that the Empire might remain free, and that right might always prevail against wrong. During the summer he had visited portions of the battlefields, and had there witnessed a sight which he would not readily forget. In a portion of the battle front where the fighting had been particularly severe, known as the Labyrinth, the widow of a French officer, accompanied by her only child, was waiting patiently while a party of soldiers were examining the ground, but could not discover what remained of her loved one. Her Grace asked why she sought for her husband's body in one particular place, and her reply was "The grass is greener where the soil is richer." In the same way we were a richer nation because these men had faced the sacrifice and poured forth their blood in France and other distant lands. At one period of the war the outlook was so dark that victory was apparently unobtainable, and during that period where was there a house, where was there a cottage, where was there a castle whose inhabitants did not await the receipt of some telegram stating that some loved one had been killed - or smitten down with wounds - in words which entailed suffering and pain? His Grace then referred to the widespread effort which had been made in the parish on behalf of the memorial, and said that those who mourned the loss of loved ones should be specially regarded with a sympathetic eye. He thought, however, that their grief might be tinged, or perhaps, tempered with pride that by the sacrifice of these men our country remained free, and our Empire was consolidated. The Duke concluded by expressing the reverent hope that the souls of those to whom it was erected now rested in peace. He then unveiled the memorial.

The singing of the National Anthem, led by Mr W.G. Rodgers, and the sounding of the "Last Post" by Bugler N.R. Fairbairn, Kelso, concluded the proceedings, after which the Duchess of Roxburghe placed a funeral wreath at the base of the memorial.
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stuartn



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PostPosted: Mon Jan 21, 2019 7:59 am    Post subject: WMR (ex UKNIWM) report Reply with quote

WMR 81415
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Kenneth Morrison



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PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2019 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just to add some bits to Ian's notes above, and to put the names in alphabetical order:

PTE. ROBERT J. ALEXANDER,
POST OFFICE RIFLES, MAY 21, 1916
.
Robert Johnston Alexander – age 37 – Rifleman (3687) 1/8th Battalion, London Regiment (Post Office Rifles)
Robert had been a rural postman, based at Kelso, since 1898. He enlisted in April 1915 and joined his battalion in France in 1916.
Born 1879 in Roxburgh. Son of the late William Alexander (died 1902) and of Frances or Fanny Lightly (Johnston) Alexander of Rose Cottage, Roxburgh.
Missing in Action on 21 May 1916 and named on the Arras Memorial, France.
Also named on the Kelso War Memorial.


PTE. GEORGE ANDERSON,
ROYAL SCOTS, SEPTEMBER 8, 1917
.
George Anderson – age 33 – Private (375616) 1/9th (Highlanders) Battalion, Royal Scots.
In 1911 George was an assistant gamekeeper living at Kersmains, Roxburgh and was head gamekeeper with the Duke of Roxburghe, who he had served for 15 years, when he enlisted.
Born 1883 in Eckford, Roxburghshire. Son of the late William and Betsy Anderson of Eccles Tofts Farm, Eccles, Berwickshire. Husband of Isabella (Broomfield) Anderson of Moor Cottage, Roxburgh and of Baillie Knowe Farm, Kelso, Roxburghshire, who he married in 1914 in Roxburgh.
Missing in Action on 8 September 1917 and named on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.
Also named on the Kelso War Memorial.


PTE. PETER ARMSTRONG,
CAMERON HIGHRS., SEPTEMBER 26, 1915
.
Peter Armstrong – age 26 – Private (S/14346) 7th Battalion, Cameron Highlanders.
Peter enlisted in November 1914 and landed with his battalion at Boulogne in July 1915 but he was killed two months later during the battle of Loos.
Born 1889 in Roxburgh. Son of William and Janet (Liddell) Armstrong of Heiton, Roxburgh.
Missing in Action on 26 September 1915 and named on the Loos Memorial, France.
Also named on the Kelso War Memorial.
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Kenneth Morrison



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PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2019 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SERGT. THOMAS BIGGAR, M.M.
ROYAL SCOTS. JULY 15, 1918
.
Thomas Biggar, Military Medal – age 21 – Sergeant (40126) 12th Battalion, Royal Scots.
Thomas joined his battalion in France in 1916. He was wounded twice and was awarded a M.M. for bravery in the field in 1917.
Born 1896 in Kelso, Roxburghshire. Son of Robert and Jane (Patterson) Biggar of Heiton, Roxburgh.
Killed in Action on 16 July 1918 and buried in Le Peuplier Military Cemetery, Caestre, France.
Also named on the Kelso War Memorial.


LIEUT. WILLIAM G. EWART
FIFE & FORFAR YEO., MARCH 30, 1918
.
Note: CWGC shows his unit as 13th Battalion, F&F Yeomanry but the grave registration records show him as attached to the 13th Royal Scots.
William Grieve Ewart – age 34 – Lieutenant, Fife and Forfar Yeomanry, attached to the 13th Battalion, Royal Scots.
William was educated at the Edinburgh Institution (later Stewart's Melville College) before he became a stockbroker's clerk, living with his family at Royal Circus in Edinburgh. At the outbreak of war he was at the Estancia "Los Aromas", San Genaro, Santa Fι in Argentina and he sailed from La Plata, Buenos Aires in November 1915. He was commissioned in the Fife & Forfar Yeomanry in December 1915. He was seconded to the Lewis Gun School as an instructor in July 1917 and was promoted to Lieutenant in October.
Born 1882 in Edinburgh. Son of James and Eliza Agnes (Grieve) Ewart of Cairnmount, Roxburgh and of Littledene, Kirkbank, Burntisland, Fife. Missing in Action on 30 March 1918 and named on the Arras Memorial, France.
Also named on the Kelso War Memorial.


PTE THOS. B. FAIRBAIRN,
SEAFORTH HIGHRS., MAY 9, 1915
.
Thomas Blackie Fairbairn – age 19 – Private (S/5340) 1st Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders.
Thomas joined his battalion in France in March 1915 but died two months later. He was reported to be the first man from Roxburgh Parish to fall.
(Peter Reid died on 25 April 1915 at Gallipoli but it was some months before his death was confirmed)
Born 1896 Bonnyrigg, Cockpen, Midlothian. Son of Robert and Margaret (Blackie) Fairbairn of New Cottages, Roxburgh.
Died of Wounds on 9 May 1915 and buried in St. Vaast Post Military Cemetery, Richebourg-L'Avoue, France.
Also named on the Kelso War Memorial.
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Kenneth Morrison



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PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2019 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LCE. CORPL. ANDREW FORTUNE,
K.O.S.B., OCTOBER 4, 1917
.
Andrew Fortune – age 21 – Lance Corporal (40060) 2nd Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers.
Andrew was a ploughman at Fairnington Farm, Roxburgh when he enlisted in the 4th KOSB Reserve in November 1914.
Born 1896 in Ancrum, Roxburghshire. Son of James and Margaret Archibald (Ferguson) Fortune of Fairnington, Roxburgh.
Missing in Action on 4 October 1917 and named on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.
Also named on the Kelso War Memorial.
His brother and name-sake, Andrew Fortune, Corporal (3190327) 2nd Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers, born in 1920, was killed in 1944 and is named on the WW2 memorial in Roxburgh Parish Church.


PTE. ARTHUR D. KERSS,
CANADIAN LT. INF., SEPTEMBER 3, 1918
.
Arthur Dodds Kerss – age 31 – Private (447996) 44th Battalion, Canadian Infantry.
Arthur was a carpenter when he enlisted at Calgary, Alberta in November 1915. He sailed from Halifax, Nova Scotia in March 1916. He joined his battalion in France August but due to illness it was December 1917 before he became fully effective. Arthur was killed by shell fire at Dury, Arras
Born 1887 in Roxburgh. Son of James Kerss, estate manager at Sanlaws, Roxburgh and of Shidlaw, Cornhill-on-Tweed, Northumberland, and of Janet (Dodds) Kerss,
Missing in Action on 3 September 1918 and named on the Vimy Memorial, France.
Also named on the Kelso War Memorial.
Three of his older brothers also served in the Canadian Infantry, Alexander, Pte.461171, George, Pte. 447111, James, Sgt. 20041.

The Canadian Dury Memorial commemorates the Canadian Corps actions during the Second Battle of Arras in their defeat of the Drocourt–Quιant Line defences of the Hindenburg Line. Seven Canadians earned a Victoria Cross on 2 September.


PTE. ALEXANDER MABON,
SCOTTISH RIFLES, FEBRUARY 24, 1919
.
Alexander Mabon – age 39 – Private (41659) 5th/6th Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)
In 1915 Alexander was a farm servant at Ladyrig, Roxburgh. He was wounded on 3 October 1918 and evacuated to the Special Military Surgical Hospital, Northfield, Birmingham where he died four months later.
Born 1879 in Edrom, Berwickshire. Son of the late Thomas Mabon (died 1892) and of Margaret (Clark) Mabon of Temple Hall Coldingham, Berwickshire.
Died of Wounds on 24 February 1919 and buried in Coldingham Priory Churchyard. (CWG)
Also named on the Kelso War Memorial and on the Coldingham Parish War Memorial.
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Kenneth Morrison



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PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2019 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CAPTAIN JAMES McLAREN,
A. & S. HIGHRS., NOVEMBER 21, 1917
.
James McLaren – age 22 – Captain, 1/7th Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.
James was educated at Edinburgh Academy and was captain of the school in 1914. He was commissioned in October 1914. He joined his battalion at Ypres in May 1915 but was gassed and evacuated to hospital in Bedford in June. He was promoted to Captain in October 1916 but was killed the following year at Cambrai.
Born 1895 at Easter Cornton Farm, Logie, Stirling. Son of the late Agnes Thomson (Somerville) McLaren (died 1906 in Logie) and of Duncan McLaren of Cornton and of Fairmington, Roxburgh.
Missing in Action on 21 November 1917 and named on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France.
Also named on the Kelso War Memorial, on the Causewayhead & Cambuskenneth War Memorial near Stirling, on the Stirling War Memorial and on the Edinburgh Academy memorial.

and his brother who died two days earlier


2nd. LIEUT. WILLIAM S. McLAREN,
R.F.C., NOVEMBER 18, 1917
.
William Somerville McLaren – age 19 – Second Lieutenant, 48 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps and General List.
William was educated at Edinburgh Academy and was captain of the school in 1915. He enlisted as Private (28021) in the King's Own Scottish Borderers in December 1916 but was discharged in April 1917 to a commission on the General List for the RFC. He joined his squadron in September 1917. William's Bristol fighter was shot down near Dixmunde and his Observer, 2nd Lieutenant David Whyte Hardie was killed. William died a day later.
Born 1898 at Easter Cornton Farm, Logie, Stirling. Son of the late Agnes Thomson (Somerville) McLaren (died 1906 in Logie) and of Duncan McLaren of Cornton and of Fairmington, Roxburgh.
Died of Wounds on 19 November 1917 and buried in Zuydcoote Military Cemetery, France.
Also named on the Kelso War Memorial, on the Causewayhead & Cambuskenneth War Memorial near Stirling, on the Stirling War Memorial and on the Edinburgh Academy memorial.


LCE. CORPL. JAMES QUEENAN, M.M.
K.O.S.B., SEPTEMBER 18, 1918
.
James Queenan, Military Medal – age 27 – Lance Corporal (40059) 2nd Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers.
In 1911 James, aged 21, was a farm labourer living with his family (listed as Queening) at Haddon Farm Cottages, Sprouston, Roxburghshire. He was awarded a M.M. for bravery in the field in the summer of 1918 but was killed at Cambrai.
Born 1890 at Kersmains, Roxburgh. Son of the late Michael Queenan (died 1905) and of Ellen (Brannan) Queenan.
Killed in Action on 18 September 1918 and buried in Gouzeaucourt New British Cemetery, France.
Also named on the Kelso War Memorial.
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Kenneth Morrison



Joined: 29 Sep 2008
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2019 2:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LCE. CORPL. CHARLES REID,
K.O.S.B., SEPTEMBER 26, 1916
.
Charles Reid – age 21 – Lance Corporal (13532) 2nd Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers.
Charles was a farm servant at Sunlaws, Roxburgh when enlisted in August 1914. He landed with the 8th KOSB at Boulogne in July 1915 and served in the combined 7th/8th KOSB after they merged in May 1916. He then transferred to the 2nd KOSB and was killed on the Somme.
Born 1895 in Galashiels, Selkirkshire. Son of Helen (Tinlin) Reid of Sunlawshill Farm, Roxburgh, and step-son of Peter Joseph Rhodden who Helen married in 1900 in Hume, Berwickshire.
Missing in Action on 25 September 1916 and named on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme, France.
Also named on the Kelso War Memorial.

and his brother

PTE. PETER J. REID,
K.O.S.B., APRIL 25, 1915
.
Peter Reid – age 23 – Private (10776) 1st Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers.
Peter had enlisted in 1909 and was serving with the 1st KOSB at Lucknow in India in August 1914. The battalion moved to Egypt in November and then returned to England in December. They sailed again in March 1915 and landed at Cape Helles in Gallipoli in April. Peter was killed during the landings. Initially reported as missing his remains were recovered and re-interred after the war.
Born 1892 at Lochside, Melrose, Roxburghshire as Patrick Reid.
Son of the late Patrick or Peter Reid (died 1892) and of Helen (Tinlin) Reid of Sunlawshill Farm, Roxburgh, and step-son of Peter Joseph Rhodden who Helen married in 1900 in Berwickshire.
Killed in Action on 25 April 1915 and buried in Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery, Gallipoli, Turkey.
Also named on the Kelso War Memorial.


Helen (Tinlin) Reid/Rhodden's eldest son was also killed but does not seem to be named on any local war memorial.

JOHN TINLIN – age 29 – Private (8245) 2nd Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers.
John had served with the KOSB since 1904 and had spent 8 years in Egypt and India before joining the Army Reserve. He was a farm servant at Sunlawshill, Roxburgh when he married in April 1913. He was mobilised at the outbreak of war and landed with his battalion at Le Havre in August 1914.
Born 1885 in Sprouston, Roxburghshire. Son of Helen (Tinlin) Reid/Rhodden of Sunlawshill Farm, Roxburgh. Husband of Janet (Patterson) Tinlin of Manorhill, Makerston, Roxburghshire and of Bilton's Court, Morpeth, Northumberland who he married in 1913 in Makerstoun.
Missing in Action on 18 April 1915 and named on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.
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