The Scottish Military Research Group - Commemorations Project Forum Index The Scottish Military Research Group - Commemorations Project
(Registered Scottish Charity No. SC043826). Please visit our homepage at www.scottishmilitaryresearch.co.uk
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Kirknewton & East Calder, West Lothian
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Scottish Military Research Group - Commemorations Project Forum Index -> Lothians - Civic Memorials
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 8:18 am    Post subject: War Memorial Fundraising Committee Reply with quote

KIRKNEWTON
WAR MEMORIAL
A public meeting was held in the Institute Hall, last week, when Mr. Welwood, (who occupied the chair), reported that at a meeting of the General Committee, it was unanimously agreed to erect the Memorial at the top of the Milrig Road, near Mid Calder Station. Later in the week, the local committee met and appointed the following collectors – Kirknewton Village – Messrs D. Grieg and Ferguson; Kirknewton East - Messrs John Martin Jr. and D. Monteith; Kirknewton West – Rev. Dr. Gardiner and Mr John Martin Snr. ; Kirknewton South – Messrs Joseph Millar and R. C. Harwell. Mr D. Greig was appointed secretary and treasurer.
(Midlothian Advertiser 19 April, 1919)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 8:44 am    Post subject: Private Alexander Stewart Laird, S/3412, Black Watch Reply with quote

LOCAL SOLDIER KILLED
In a letter from Lieutenant Colonel Commanding the 8th (3) Battalion of the Black Watch, the news of the death of her son, Pte. Alex Laird, was communicated to Mrs G. Weir, East Calder. The letter states that Pte. Laird fell in the recent action at Longueval on 14th to 19th July, and it is impossible to send anything of the deceased's death apart from the intimation. The letter goes on to state that the regiment all through this trying period upheld its traditions, and nothing could have exceeded the courage and determination of all concerned. Pte. Laird, before enlistment, was employed by the Pumpherston Oil Coy at Pumpherston Works. Being well-known in the district, his death has given rise to much regret and sympathy in the village.
(Midlothian Advertiser 1 September 1916)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 9:08 am    Post subject: Private William Morrison, 123243, C.E.F. Reply with quote

William Morrison
Born 17 April 1885 at Oakbank, Midlothian. 1901 census shows him living with his parents, John and Janet Morrison, and siblings at 125 Oakbank, Midlothian. His occupation is given as Joiner's Apprentice.
William emigrated to Canada and his service record informs:
Service Number: 123243
Unit: Canadian Infantry(Western Ontario Regiment)
Division: 18th Battalion
Enlisted: 13 Sept 1915 at London, Ontario
Address: 1226 Florence Street, London, Ontario, Canada
Wife: Margaret Morrison
Trade: Car Repairer G.T.R.
William Morrison died of wounds 21 August 1917.

In Memoriam Notice

Morrison
In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. William Morrison, Canadian Expeditionary Force, who died of wounds received in action on August 21st 1917.

No more we hear the postman's knock,
Nor read the news that brought us cheer,
A soldier's grave has claimed his form,
We mourn for one we loved so dear.

His warfare o'er, his battle fought,
His victory won, though dearly bought;
His fresh young life they could not save,
He slumbers now in a soldier's grave.

Inserted by his loving brother and sister, Mr and Mrs John Morrison, 215 Tarbrax
(Midlothian Advertiser 23 August 1918)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 9:56 am    Post subject: A Patriotic Family: The McDermott Brothers Reply with quote

Private Hugh McDermott, 13186, KOSB, died age 21 on 18 April 1915. This news article tells of his patriotic family, the McDermott brothers.

TWO EAST CALDER SOLDIERS WOUNDED
A PATRIOTIC FAMILY

Official Information has reached Mr Hugh McDermott, East Calder that his sons, Lce.-Cpl. Patrick and Pte Joseph McDermott, have been wounded in action.
Lce.-Cpl. McDermott who is 24 years of age joined the 12th Batt. Royal Scots in Edinburgh at the outbreak of hostilities, and took part in all the fighting that his regiment was engaged in on the Western Front up till 2 September , when he was wounded. The wound was a slight one and he would in all probability have been serving with his regiment again, but an attack of rheumatic fever, necessitated his removal to Devonshire Hospital, Buxton, England, where, as he says in a letter home, he is receiving every attention.
Pte. Joseph McDermott enlisted in the 8th Battalion, Gordon Highlanders, shortly after the war commenced. He is 26 years of age, and in civil life was an employee of the Pumpherston Oil Coy. at Tarbrax. Like his brother, he saw much fighting on the Western Front, and was wounded while serving in the trenches by a sandbag, which was blown in on top of him by a shell bursting, and which caused an injury to his back. He is at present in the Sick Children's Hospital, Aberdeen.
All Mr McDermott's three sons have suffered for their country. Pte. Hugh McDermott, K.O.S.B., being killed at the taking of Hill 60. For this act of patriotism on his family's part, the warm sympathy of all in the district will be extended to Mr McDermott.
(Midlothian Advertiser 15 Oct 1915)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 10:00 am    Post subject: Extracts from Letters from a POW Reply with quote

I found this news article that gives a glimpse of life in one prison camp towards the end of the war.

John Milligan is the brother of Private James Milligan, 53718, R.S.F., who died 19 July 1918 at the age of 18. 1901 census shows John(aged Cool and James(aged 1) staying with parents, John and Elizabeth, and siblings at Railway Crossing, Humbie, Kirknewton. John seems to have spent the majority of the war years as a POW.

KIRKNEWTON
LOCAL SOLDIER'S EXPERIENCES IN GERMANY
We give a few extracts from letters received by Mr. John Milligan, Humbie Crossing, Kirknewton from his son, Corporal John Milligan. The latter has been a prisoner of war since 1914, and was lately transferred to Holland where he is now interned:- “ I was at a cinema the other day, and saw some of the latest types of guns we have. What a difference there is to the old tin cans we had. We get some English papers here also. It is a great change to be able to read them and compare them with the German papers. The individual Germans would be glad of peace now at any cost. All they talked to me about was food and peace. What a difference from their bragging and boasting in the early days of the war. South Germans hate the Prussians more than they hate us, and they will tell you so. They had a great fight at the barracks near Henterg the last winter I was there, and a few were killed and wounded. I don't know what they are going to do with us here. We have had meat once in five weeks, and now they are cutting down the butter. Three times a week we get a plate of dirty watery soup for tea, and the other four days we get nothing. If a Britisher buys anything out of a shop he is always charged double price, or refused it altogether. A bun which at home costs 1d costs 1s here. Two ounces of Gallacher's plug costs the equivalent of 2s 3d.”
(Midlothian Advertiser 21 June 1918)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 1:32 pm    Post subject: Not on the Memorial: Pte Robert Morrison Russell Reply with quote

This name is not on the memorial, however a family grave gives Robert Morrison Russell's regiment as Royal Warwickshire Regiment.
Gravestone in Kirknewton Cemetery Lair 264:
Erected by William and Jane Russell, In loving memory of their son, Robert Morrison Russell, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, died 27 April 1917, in his 23rd year.
Parents' deaths are recorded on the stone too.

He is listed on CWGC.

The service record makes interesting reading, telling the story of a young man who was not in the best of health.

Service No: 15336
Regiment: 3rd Warwick (at the time of discharge he was attached to 33 Training Rescue)
Enlisted: Birmingham on 22 October 1915. Shows he had been in the Army Pay Corps 7 Nov 1914 and was discharged.
Address: 117 Slade Street, Birmingham
Occupation: Government Clerk
Next of Kin: Jane Russell, Ormiston, Kirknewton
Discharge: Wool Hospital, Medical Report N5821/16 dated 1 Dec 1916 gives cause as Diabetes Mellitis. He was discharged 22 Dec 1916 as being permanently unfit, no longer physically fit for service. Military Character: Good; Conduct During Service: Good

He died four months after his discharge.
GROS: 1917 664/10 0124
Found dead about 8.00pm on 27 April 1917, 485 Cathedral Street, Glasgow. He was working as a clerk with a rubber tyre company. Cause of death was Pleurisy and Bronchitis. He was 22 years of age.
www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 1:36 pm    Post subject: Pte James Renwick, S/22810. Cameron Highlanders Reply with quote

THE WAR
EAST CALDER SOLDIER KILLED
This week Mr Mrs John Renwick have been officially notified that their son James, who was previously posted as missing, is now reported as having been killed. Previous to enlistment, Pte Renwick was a miner in the employment of the Oakbank Oil Coy. at Dedridge Mine, Mid Calder. Sympathy is felt for the parents in their sad bereavement.
(Midlothian Advertiser 26 July 1918)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 1:41 pm    Post subject: Pte George Wilkie, 14301, Scots Guards Reply with quote

LOCAL SOLDIER KILLED
We regret to record the death of Pte. George Wilkie, Scots Guards, son of Mrs Wilkie, Kirknewton, who received the sad intelligence in the following letter from Sister Forrest, British Red Cross Society and Order of St. John:- Dear Mrs Wilkie, This brings you sad news of your son, Pte. Wilkie, 14301. He was brought into our hospital last night wounded in the abdomen, and very ill indeed. We did all we could for him, but he died this morning at 12.30.am quite peacefully. He was too weak to talk to us. With much sympathy. (Signed) Sister Forrest.
Pte. Wilkie exhibited a fine patriotism and was a fine example to his countrymen. He enlisted at East Calder into the Royal Scots on August 24th, 1914. On the 6th of March 1915, he was found to be medically unfit, and was discharged with a good character after having attained the rank of corporal. After undergoing three months treatment at Woodburn Sanatorium, Canaan Lane, Edinburgh, he re-enlisted into the Scots Guards on August 14th 1915. In 1917 he was wounded over the right eye by shell-fire, immediately he went over the top, and met his fate as has just been stated. He is the eighth member of the local branch of the Scottish Rural Workers' Friendly Society to make the supreme sacrifice. Our sincere sympathy goes out to Mrs Wilkie and family in their sad bereavement.
(Midlothian Advertiser 30 August 1918)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 3:53 pm    Post subject: Pte William Tait, 19668, 16th Royal Scots Reply with quote

THE LATE PRIVATE TAIT
Another soldier member (the second) of the local branch of the Scottish Rural Workers' Friendly Society, viz., Private William Tait, 16th Royal Scots (M'Crae's) has been killed in the great push. He joined up on December 14th, 1914 and went to the front in the spring. He is a grandson of Mr. Mrs. James Tait, Little Vantage, Kirknewton, by whom he was brought up from infancy. As yet the old man has not told his wife of their sad loss, as she is confined to bed with paralysis. Our sympathy goes out to these old folks who have been so sorely bereaved. Prior to the war Pte. Tait worked at Dedridge, and then at the limestone pit at Harburn.
(Midlothian Advertiser 25 August 1916)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 3:58 pm    Post subject: Pte James Reid, S/18255 5th Bn. Cameron Highlanders Reply with quote

EAST CALDER
LOCAL SOLDIER KILLED IN ACTION

Another of our local lads has paid the extreme sacrifice in the recent fighting in France, in the person of Pte James Reid, who was killed in the battle of Delville Wood on 18th July. News of his death was conveyed to his mother in a letter sent by the Lieutenant of his battalion who writes: “Dear Mrs Reid, I deeply regret to inform you that your son, Pte J. Reid, was killed in action during the operations in Delville Wood on 18th July last. Until now I refrained from writing, in the hope that our casualty list might be amended, but I must now mourn the loss of one of our best and bravest soldiers. As his platoon officer I had a high appreciation of his excellent qualities, and grieve that he must be numbered among our gallant dead. I will not intrude on your sorrow, and I trust you may be strengthened to bear the pain of such a noble sacrifice. Sincerely yours, H.G. Brown, 2nd Lieut. 5th C.H.”
Pte Reid was 11 months out in France, and previous to joining the 5th Cameron Highlanders was employed as a miner with Oakbank Oil Coy. At Dedridge Mine, Mid Calder, and resided at Raw Cottages, East Calder. He was 29 years of age, and was highly respected in the district. Much sympathy is expressed for his mother and family in their sorrow.
(Midlothian Advertiser 25 August 1916)

Midlothian Advertiser 1 September 1916 has photograph of Pte Reid
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 4:01 pm    Post subject: The Brothers Flynn Reply with quote

OAKBANK
LOCAL SOLDIER KILLED
Sapper Michael Flynn, Royal Engineers, has been killed in action.
Sapper Flynn who was 28 years of age, resided, prior to joining the army, with his widowed mother in Oakbank and was employed as a shale miner by the Oakbank Oil Coy. He enlisted into the Irish Guards at Edinburgh in October 1914. His military training was accomplished at Caterham and at Warley Barracks, England. From the latter place, he left for the front in May 1915, and transferred into the Royal Engineers. Notification of his death was sent by a Roman Catholic priest, J. H. Bamford C.F., who stated that Sapper Flynn was shot in the head and killed instantaneously on 16 April. He was buried the following day in a little English cemetery near the village, and his grave is marked by a simple wooden cross.
Another brother, Pte. Matthew Flynn is serving his country with the Grenadier Guards.
Much sympathy is felt for his widowed mother, who is at present in feeble health.
(Midlothian Advertiser May 1916)


OAKBANK
LOCAL SOLDIER KILLED

Notification of an official character has been received by Mrs Flynn, Oakbank, stating that her son, Lance-Corporal Matthew Flynn, Grenadier Guards, has been killed in action.
Lce.-Corporal Flynn, of which the above is a photo, was 25 years of age, and in civil life was employed by the Oakbank Oil Coy. He enlisted at Edinburgh in September 1914, into the Grenadier Guards, and underwent his military training at Caterham in England before being sent to France in July, 1915. Except for a short leave of four days before proceeding to the scene of hostilities, Lce.Cpl. Flynn was never home since he answered the call for men. He took part in a great deal of heavy fighting, but the only battles he made much reference to in his letters home were Loos and Hill 70, from both of which he escaped unhurt. No intimation is given as to where he met his death, but it is supposed to have been in the operations on the Somme between 14th and 17th September last. Another brother, Sapper Michael Flynn, R.E., was killed in action in April last and sincere sympathy will be extended to their widowed mother in this her second sacrifice.
(Midlothian Advertiser 20 October 1916)


Both brothers are remembered on Ireland's Memorial Records 1914-1918

Flynn Michael,
Reg. No. 77904; Rank: Sapper, Royal Engineers(formerly Irish Guards); Killed in action, France, April 16, 1916; Born Foxford Co. Mayo
(Page 190)
Flynn Matthew
Re. No.20249; Rank: Lance-Corporal , Grenadier Guards 3rd Batt.; Killed in action, France Sept.14 – 17 1916; Born Shanestmore, Co. Mayo
(Page 189)

Matthew Flynn is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial.
Flynn Lce. Cpl. Matthew, 20249, 3rd Bn. Genadier Guards, 14/17 Sept 1916
( Index No. M.R. 21 Thiepval Mem Part XVI)

1901 Census: Both brothers staying at 44 Oakbank, Midlothian.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 4:05 pm    Post subject: Pte John Watt, 5455, Royal Scots Fusiliers Reply with quote

OAKBANK
LOCAL SOLDIER DIES IN GERMANY

Official news has reached Mr David Watt, who resides with his daughter Mrs Sked, Calderhall Lodge, East Calder, that his son Pte John Watt, R.S.F., died through the effects of an operation performed on him while a prisoner of war in Germany. Pte. Watt was taken prisoner at the first battle of Ypres on 11th November 1914. For eight months his whereabouts were unknown, and his friends had given up all hope of seeing him alive again when a postcard arrived from Germany saying he was prisoner of war in Wittenberg. From there he was transferred to Zerbet Lager where the operation was performed. Pte. Watt was 30 years of age. He joined the Territorials in Edinburgh in 1908 and at the outbreak of the war was called to the colours, joining the Royal Scots Fusiliers. In civil life he was employed by the Oakbank Oil Coy. Much sympathy is felt for his friends, who have thus been called upon to mourn his loss when their hopes of seeing him soon were raised high by the cessation of hostilities and the liberation of all prisoners.
(Midlothian Advertiser 22 November 1918)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 4:08 pm    Post subject: Pte John Bryce, 2629, 2/10 Royal Scots Reply with quote

Local Soldier Dies of Wounds

The above is a photograph of Pte. John Bryce, of the 2/10 Royal Scots, who died of wounds received in action on 24th September. Pte. Bryce is a son of Mr and Mrs William Bryce, The Cottage, Kirkgate, West Calder, and is only 19 years of age. He enlisted at Bathgate in January, and after a period of training he went out to France nearly three months ago. Pte. Brody, Linlithgow, wrote home stating that Pte. Bryce had been wounded in action and had been taken to hospital. On Tuesday morning, however, official notice was received that he had succumbed to his his injuries. Sympathy will be felt for the parents and family in their sad bereavement.

Death Notices

BRYCE – Died of wounds received in action on 24th September, Pte. John Bryce, 2/10 Royal Scots, in his 19th year, eldest son of William and Agnes Bryce, Manse Cottage, West Calder. Deeply regretted.

He marched away so bravely,
His young head proudly held,
His spirit never faltered,
His courage never failed.

While on the field of battle,
He calmly took his place,
And fought and died for Britain
And the honour of his race.

Inserted by his father and mother.
Source: Midlothian Advertiser, October 1916
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 4:11 pm    Post subject: Corporal James Hunter, 12338, 12Bn. Royal Scots Reply with quote

Kirknewton
The Late Corporal James Hunter

Corporal James Hunter, eldest son of Mr James Hunter, miner, Kirknewton, has been killed in the great advance. He enlisted in the 1/12th Battalion Royal Scots on 24th August 1914, previous to which he was employed at Dedridge. Proceeding with his regiment to France on 10th May last year, he there saw a good deal of active service, taking part in much trench fighting at the Battle of Loos and in the present advance. He is one of a long list of heroes who have given their lives for us. Sincere sympathy is felt for the bereaved family in their great loss. Second Lieutenant D. E. Gordon pays a warm tribute to the late corporal in the following letter, which he sent to the father, Mr James Hunter:
“It is with great regret that I write to inform you of the death of your son, Corporal James Hunter. He was killed on the afternoon of the 6th July (while doing duty in the trenches) by a shell. He died immediately, and would not suffer in the least. We shall all miss him, and, personally, I shall find his place exceedingly difficult to fill. He was a most trustworthy N.C.O., and everyone had the greatest confidence in him. May I offer you, on behalf of his brother soldiers and myself, our sincerest sympathy in your great loss. We buried him in the wood just close to where he fell and placed a cross over him. I am unable to give you the position at present, but if I am spared in a week or two I will write you giving you the exact position of his grave. Bright up to his death, your son was a perfect example of a fearless soldier. He was always able to raise a smile, even when things were going against us, and in truth it was a privilege to have met such a man. He has on different occasions spoken to me of death, and if anyone was prepared he was. He has made the greatest sacrifice a man can make, and in your grief, I hope that a little brightness may shine through when you think he died as a man fighting for principle against wrong. I am enclosing what little he had with him. If there is any other information I can give you I shall be delighted to do so.”

Source: Midlothian Advertiser, 18 August 1916

Midlothian Advertiser, 25 August 1916 shows a photograph of Corporal James Hunter (not good quality) with the words:

The above is a photograph of Corporal James Hunter, 1/12 Royal Scots, eldest son of Mr James Hunter, Kirknewton, who was killed in France recently. A sketch of his career appeared in last week's issue.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MagsD



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Posts: 172
Location: West Lothian

PostPosted: Sat May 05, 2012 4:16 pm    Post subject: Pte William McKie, S/21255, Cameron Highlanders Reply with quote

OAKBANK
OAKBANK SOLDIER KILLED

Mr and Mrs James McKie, 133 Oakbank, have been informed that their son, Pte William McKie, Cameron Highlanders, of whom the above is a photo, was killed in action on 30th June. In a letter to Mrs McKie, Sergt, David Cochrane tells that Pte McKie met his death in the early morning of 30th June while bravely doing his duty, his death being instantaneous. The sergeant says he always found him to be a capable and efficient soldier, always willing to undertake any duties he was asked to perform, and his conduct was all that could be desired.
Pte McKie who had passed his 25th birthday, joined the army at East Calder on 1st September 1914. He was a baker to trade, having served his apprenticeship with the late Mr David Hunter, Mid Calder; but prior to enlisting was employed by the Oakbank Oil Coy. For nine months he followed his trade as baker at Invergordon where his regiment was stationed , varicose veins being an impediment to his military training. This life he found too quiet. The departure of comrades to do their bit on foreign soil inspired him with a spirit for a more active life, and he underwent an operation and had the troublesome veins removed. In three months his military training was completed, and he was sent to France with a draft in September 1915. He experienced long spells of trench duty, and during one engagement was slightly gassed.
Another son, Pte I McKie, is on home service.
(Midlothian Advertiser 14 July 1916)

The last line of the above news article mentions Pte I McKie.
Private Ivie McKie, 330381 Royal Scots ,was the brother of William McKie. 1901 census William(10 yrs) and Ivie(4 yrs) living with their parents, James and Elizabeth, and siblings at Main Street, Mid Calder.

This newspaper article tells of Pte Ivie McKie being wounded in action.
OAKBANK
LOCAL SOLDIER WOUNDED

Mr and Mrs James McKie, 133 Oakbank, have received official information that their son, Pte I McKie, has been wounded in action on the Western front. The official missive states that Pte McKie received a gunshot wound in the right wrist on 25th March last, and that he is being treated in No. 3 Convalescent Hospital, Le Treport, France. Pte McKie joined the Royal Scots at Mid Calder on January 1915. In August 1917 he was slightly wounded in the arm, but after being under treatment for a short time in a French Hospital, he was able to resume duty. He is 21 years of age, and was at one time in the employment of the Oakbank Oil Company, but left the service of the Caledonian Railway Company to join the colours.
(Midlothian Advertiser 12 April 1918)
24 November 1918: Discharge Papers show Pte Ivie McKie was discharged due to “GSW to chest, right side, 6th rib wound causing injury to lung.”
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Scottish Military Research Group - Commemorations Project Forum Index -> Lothians - Civic Memorials All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Page 2 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group. Hosted by phpBB.BizHat.com