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Biggar, South Lanarkshire
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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7662
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: McALLISTER, JOHN
Initials: J
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Unit Text: 489 (R.N.Z.A.F.) Sqdn.
Date of Death: 09/04/1943
Service No: 1052442
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 157.
Memorial: RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL

MCALLISTER, john by Scottish Military Research Group, on Flickr

"John McAllister was born on July 17, 1921, and he came with his mother into Biggar from Crawford a number of years ago. He was going to be an architect, and after leaving Biggar High School he went as an apprentice to Mr Stewart, architect, in Lanark. The war, however, changed everything for him. He joined the RAF and quickly qualified as a wireless operator and air gunner. He flew on many missions with Coastal Command over the Channel and the North Sea, and latterly, as a sergeant, stationed at Leuchars, he flew regularly to the Norwegian coasts. It was in a raid over Norway on April 9, 1943, that the plane, with John and all the crew, was lost. His friends remember him as an able lad with fine prospects before him. He was a good footballer, a good sportsman in every way, with a kindly nature and a true and fine spirit."


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David McNay
Curator


Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7662
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

John J McGavin is not commemorated by the CWGC. It is clear that he had been discharged at the time of his death, and his death doesn't appear to have been cause by his war service. While he is not commemorated by the CWGC, he is still remembered, both on the War Memorial in Biggar and by the members of this forum.

MCGAVIN, John J by Scottish Military Research Group, on Flickr

"John Joseph McGavin was born in 1896 and was one of a small band who went from Biggar to serve in both the war of 1914-18 and that of 1939-45. his health was never very good, but he had a stout heart and took a keen interest in the affairs of the town and a very active part in the local dramatic club. When war broke out in 1939 nothing would keep him from rejoining his old regiment, the Lanarkshire Yeomanry, with the rank of sergeant. Johnnie, as he was always known, found the training rather hard for his health to stand, and towards the end of 1940 he returned to his home and family in Biggar. His service, however, had taken its toll, and he never fully recovered, dying at Biggar on February 9, 1941. He is buried in Biggar kirkyard."

From the death certificate:

JOHN JOSEPH MCGAVIN, Barber (Journeyman), married to Lucy Hassard, Died 9th February 1941 at Kello Hospital, Biggar (Usual residence 17 Northcrofts Road, Biggar), aged 43 years, son of John McGavin, Baker (Journeyman) and Catherine Rooney.

CAUSE:
Chronic interstitial nephritis 7 years, Myocarditis 2 years.

INFORMANT:
John McGavin (Father), 22 Knocklea, Biggar.


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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7662
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Son of the above John Joseph McGavin.

Name: McGAVIN, JOHN GEORGE
Initials: J G
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Able Seaman
Regiment/Service: Royal Navy
Unit Text: H.M.S. Ludworth
Age: 21
Date of Death: 05/08/1944
Service No: C/JX 353182
Additional information: Son of John Joseph and Lucy Ann McGavin.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: 75, 3.
Memorial: CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL

MCGAVIN, Ian George by Scottish Military Research Group, on Flickr

"Ian George McGavin was the son of John Joseph McGavin, who, as already mentioned, served in both the Great Wars and who died in Biggar in 1941. John, or Ian, as he was better known, was born in May 1923, and on leaving school he apprenticed himself as a painter. When war began and he became of age to serve, he did not go into his father's regiment, but chose the Senior Service and became an able seaman on HMS Lulworth. Though small in stature and of a rather retiring nature he did not suggest the fighting man, but there was a fine spirit in him and a real sense of service. He went with his ship on many missions over dangerous waters and was finally lost at sea on August 5, 1944."

HMS Lulworth was formerly US Coastguard Cutter Chelan, which Britain aqcuired as part of the Lend-Lease agreement. From searching online, it appears there was no significant action that lead to McGavin losing his life.

Lulworth pictured in 1943:


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David McNay
Curator


Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7662
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: OVENS, JAMES PATERSON
Initials: J P
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Second Engineer Officer
Regiment/Service: Merchant Navy
Unit Text: S.S. Empire Lancer (Greenock)
Age: 37
Date of Death: 16/08/1944
Additional information: Husband of Mary G. C. Ovens, of Biggar, Lanarkshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 43.
Memorial: TOWER HILL MEMORIAL

OVENS, James P by Scottish Military Research Group, on Flickr

"James Paterson Ovens was born in 1907, the son of Mr Ovens, butcher, in High Street. From his early days his mind was set on the sea, and when he left Biggar High School he went to learn engineering with Messrs Weir of Cathcart, working there by day and continuing his studies at evening classes. In 1929 he joined the Merchant Navy and in the next 10 years he sailed the seven seas. He advanced steadily in his profession, passing exams, as they came along, and was in line to become a first engineer. By this time, too, he was married, with a wife and a family of girls in his home in Hawthorn Cottage. During the war his ship sailed regularly in the Atlantic convoys. He took part in the landing at Algiers and made other voyages into the dangers of the Mediterranean. It was finally on a voyage from Durban to Madagascar that his ship was torpedoed and he was lost with many of the crew. James had a fine record of service behind him, and an ever-brightening future before him, for he was a man of real ability, steadfast and reliable, in the best traditions of the sea, a fine spirit and a kindly heart."


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David McNay
Curator


Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7662
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: PATERSON, ROBERT RUSSELL
Initials: R R
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Aircraftman 1st Class
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Age: 22
Date of Death: 13/03/1942
Service No: 1368486
Additional information: Son of Robert and Jeanie Donald Paterson.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Column 418.
Memorial: SINGAPORE MEMORIAL

PATERSON, R R by Scottish Military Research Group, on Flickr

"Robert Russell Paterson was the youngest son of Mr and Mrs R Paterson, Fernbank. Born in 1920, and schooled at Biggar, Robert was learning the trade of a joiner with Messrs Brown when the war broke out. A kindly and peace-loving lad, who loved his home, the countryside and a quiet round on Biggar golf course, anything of war seemed quite foreign to his nature. In January 1941, however, he was called to the RAF as a driver. After only four months training at Blackpool, York and West Kirby, he was sent to the Far East, landing at Penang in September 1941. He was through the campaign against the Japanese right down Malaya to Singapore. As the enemy closed in on that city Robert was among those evacuated by ship, but, when at sea, the ship was attacked by enemy planes and was struck near the stern. Robert was among the killed, and he was buried at sea in February 1942."


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David McNay
Curator


Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7662
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: RITCHIE, MATTHEW ROY
Initials: M R
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Sergeant (W.Op./Air Gnr.)
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force
Unit Text: 75 Sqdn.
Age: 19
Date of Death: 10/01/1941
Service No: 631868
Additional information: Son of Robert and Catherine Q. Ritchie, of Biggar.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. B. Grave 41.
Cemetery: BIGGAR (THE CROFTS) CEMETERY

RITCHIE, Matthew Roy by Scottish Military Research Group, on Flickr

"Matthew Roy Ritchie was a young farm lad. Born at Eddleston in 1920 he lived most of his life in the Upper Ward, going to school at Wiston and Libberton. It was from Langlees farm that he joined the RAF shortly before the outbreak of war. He served at Feltwell in Norfolk, in Morayshire and in Wiltshire, first as a wireless operator, but latterly as an air gunner. Many a time he was in operations over the continent and returned in safety. But in the air danger is always present, and it was near his home aerodrome, in an air accident, that he met his death on January 14, 1941. He was the first war casualty to be buried in Biggar kirkyard. He was a lad of character and ability. A sergeant in the RAF, he was doing very well indeed, with good prospects before him. A brother, Jim, also served in the RAF while two others were in the Navy."


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David McNay
Curator


Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7662
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: SCOTT, IAN
Initials: I
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Gunner
Regiment/Service: Royal Artillery
Unit Text: 155 (The Lanarkshire Yeomanry) Field Regt.
Age: 23
Date of Death: 10/12/1943
Service No: 326279
Additional information: Son of James and Hannah Jane Scott, of Biggar, Lanarkshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: 2. D. 3.
Cemetery: KANCHANABURI WAR CEMETERY

SCOTT, Ian by Scottish Military Research Group, on Flickr

"Ian Scott was the elder son of Mr and Mrs Scott, Station Cottages. Along with his close friend, John Kelly, Ian joined the Lanarkshire Yeomanry in April 1939. On the coming of war he was at once called to the colours, and went into training at Haddington. The Yeomanry, however, were changed to Artillery, and it was as a gunner that In sailed for India in May 1941. August of that year saw him in Malaya, and when the Japanese began their attack he was with his unit holding a position on the frontiers of Siam. He suffered the hazards and hardships of the long retreat to Singapore, and there finally he was taken prisoner. Ian was among those sent North to Malai camp to work at the hard task of railway construction, and while engaged on this he contracted pneumonia and died on December 10, 1943. Now he lies in the military cemetery of Kanchunaburie, some 60 miles from Bangkok. Ian was born in Annan, but schooled in Biggar. He was a boy of a very happy and likeable disposition, happy in his work with Messrs Campbell, happy in his father's garden, but yet a boy of strong and fine character with a real sense of service and of adventure."


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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7662
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: VANCE, MELROSE
Initials: M
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Sergeant (Air Gnr.)
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Unit Text: 467 (R.A.A.F.) Sqdn
Age: 19
Date of Death: 09/06/1944
Service No: 1823455
Additional information: Son of James and Mary Vance, of Biggar.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. A. Grave 245.
Cemetery: BIGGAR (THE CROFTS) CEMETERY

VANCE, Melrose by Scottish Military Research Group, on Flickr

"Melrose Vance - 7 Northcoats Road - "Mickie" as he was called by his friends, was one of a large and vigorous family. His father served in the Q Ships in 1914-18, and two of his older brothers were in the Navy in this war. For his service Melrose chose the RAF, and he prepared for it while still serving his apprenticeship as a plasterer by joining the RAF Cadets and studying at the school in the evenings. Most of his service was in England, at Warrington, Bridge North, and Waddington, Lincs., with an Australian unit, where he was the only Scotsman. His job was the responsible and dangerous one of rear gunner on a bombing plane, flying deep into Germany. It was while returning from a raid shortly after D-Day that the plane met danger at home in the shape of fog, and crashed near Catfoss aerodrome on Jun 9, 1944. It was a sad end to a gallant career. "Mickie" was a most likeable boy, shy in manner, but true in spirit, and highly thought of by his Australian comrades. Only 19 years old when he died, his life is not to be measured by years alone. He served well, and now he rests within sight of his own home in the quiet of Biggar kirkyard."


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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7662
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: WEIR, JOHN PHILIP
Initials: J P
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Gunner
Regiment/Service: Royal Artillery
Unit Text: 19 Lt. A.A. Regt.
Age: 28
Date of Death: 24/07/1945
Service No: 1545792
Additional information: Son of Walter W. Weir and Louisa Philip Weir, of Biggar.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. A. Grave 419.
Cemetery: BIGGAR (THE CROFTS) CEMETERY
WEIR, John P by Scottish Military Research Group, on Flickr

"John Philip Weir was the son of Mr and Mrs Weir at Carwood. He was at school at Biggar and afterwards became a painter with Messrs Lindsay Brothers. It was while working there that John met with an accident resulting in the loss of an eye. That did not deter him, however, from volunteering for war service, and in 1939 he was accepted as a gunner in the Royal Artillery. He served mostly in the South of England, particularly in Kent, where he had considerable experience of the flying bombs. From his school days John was known as a keen footballer, playing for Biggar and for the YMCA team before the war, and it was specially sad that his death came directly out of an accident incurred while playing the game he loved. He died - 22 years old - in hospital in Ipswich, on July 24, 1945, but is buried in our midst in Biggar kirkyard."


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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7662
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: WHITEFIELD, JAMES
Initials: J
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment/Service: Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)
Secondary Regiment: Commando
Secondary Unit Text: and No. 9
Age: 24
Date of Death: 03/02/1944
Service No: 3249581
Additional information: Son of John and Sarah Whitefield, of Biggar, Lanarkshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: XIX. K. 22.
Cemetery: CASSINO WAR CEMETERY

WHITEFIELD, James C by Scottish Military Research Group, on Flickr

"James Callen Whitefield, son of the late John and of Mrs Whitefield, Rose Cottage, was a real Biggaronian, being born here on November 11, 1919, schooled here, and taught his trade here, as a plasterer, by his father. A quiet, gentle-mannered and kindly lad, he had a fine courageous spirit and a strong sense of service. It was this courage and sense of service that led him to transfer from the Cameronians - the regiment he joined soon after the outbreak of the war, and with which he went to Norway in 1940 - to the Commandos. He passed successfully through the long and tough training, helped, no doubt, by those physical abilities which had won him many a prize in sports at Biggar. After taking part in raids on the French coast, James sailed with his unit for North Africa in September 1943, en route for Italy, where he eventually landed in November at Taranto. He saw action in the islands of the Adriatic, on the North shores of the River Garigliano, and on many of the difficult operations given to the Commandos. He finally met his death in the desperate fighting which won for us Mount Ornito, near Cassino. It is there, near Cassino, that he now lies, in ground which he gave his life to win."


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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7662
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: WEIR WILSON, JOHN
Initials: J
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Corporal
Regiment/Service: Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
Age: 28
Date of Death: 14/01/1944
Service No: 3135886
Additional information: (served as WILSON). Son of John and Jean Weir Wilson, of Biggar; husband of Chrissie T. Wilson, of Law.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. A. Grave 360.
Cemetery: BIGGAR (THE CROFTS) CEMETERY

WILSON, J Weir by Scottish Military Research Group, on Flickr

"John Weir Wilson was born in Biggar in 1915. He was of a quiet, studious nature, and did very well at school, winning the Upperward Prize, and being dux of the Primary School in 1927-28. In June 1940, he was called from his job as a journeyman butcher with Messrs Linton Brothers, Biggar, to the Forces, joining the RSF at Ayr. His abilities soon marked him out, and he was selected to go to the Technical College at Leeds to be trained in radio-location, and he was with the REME on that interesting and highly technical work, along various parts of the East coast of England. John had a student's zeal for books, and was widely read, and interested in affairs. With his marriage in September 1940, he had the prospect of a full and useful life before him, but an enemy bomb falling on a cinema in Croydon, where he and a few friends had gone to pass a leisure hour, brought all his hopes to a sudden end. He lies at rest in his native Biggar."


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David McNay
Curator


Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7662
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 11:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just "bumping" this thread to make people aware of the new information on the WW2 names that has been added.
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apanderson
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Joined: 21 Dec 2006
Posts: 2578
Location: Stirlingshire

PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2009 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not on memorial?

Name: McCULLOCH, JOHN
Initials: J
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Private
Regiment/Service: Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)
Unit Text: 1st Bn.
Age: 37
Date of Death: 26/04/1918
Service No: 37351
Additional information: Son of Thomas and Agnes McCulloch, of Govan, Glasgow; husband of Alice McCulloch, of West Row, Biggar, Lanarkshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: IX. A. 25.
Cemetery: BOULOGNE EASTERN CEMETERY
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DelBoy



Joined: 12 Jul 2007
Posts: 4858
Location: The County of Angus

PostPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2011 12:25 am    Post subject: Lt. David Brown Reply with quote

WW1
David Brown

(Glasgow Herald 30th September 1915)
"Died on 23rd September, on hospital ship, of Dysentery, David Brown, Lieutenant, 8th H.L.I. beloved husband of Beatrice Brown, Amultree, and only son of Alex. Brown, Hartree, Biggar."

Name: BROWN, DAVID
Initials: D
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment/Service: Highland Light Infantry
Unit Text: 8th Bn.
Secondary Regiment: Royal Scots
Secondary Unit Text: attd. 7th Bn.
Date of Death: 23/09/1915
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 173 to 177.
Memorial: HELLES MEMORIAL


Last edited by DelBoy on Sat Sep 01, 2012 9:18 am; edited 1 time in total
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Elsie



Joined: 20 Apr 2008
Posts: 27
Location: Baillieston

PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 9:04 am    Post subject: Biggar/Coulter Reply with quote

The UKINWM no. given for Biggar is actually for Coulter - 5970

The no. for Biggar is 54200
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