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Kilmarnock Academy - World War 2 Roll of Honour
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David McNay
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Posts: 7649
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:13 pm    Post subject: Andrew Muir Reply with quote

Andrew Muir spent six years with us; he was an enthusiastic cadet and a Sergeant in the Corps, a keen swimmer and Rugby player. He had a distinguished career in the R.A.F., joining the first Squadron to be formed of Pathfinder Force. After the first Thousand Bomber raid on Cologne he was presented to H.M. King George VI and awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. When he lost his life over Germany in 1944 he had completed fifty-six air operations.

Name: MUIR, ANDREW
Initials: A
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Squadron Leader (Air Gnr.)
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Unit Text: 156 Sqdn.
Age: 32
Date of Death: 21/02/1944
Service No: 115170
Awards: D F C
Additional information: Son of Andrew and Katherine Muir, of Kilmarnock, Ayrshire; husband of Frances Muir.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: 8. C. 3.
Cemetery: RHEINBERG WAR CEMETERY

Andrew Muir's entry in The London Gazette for his DFC appears here:

http://www.gazettes-online.co.uk/ViewPDF.aspx?pdf=36015&geotype=London&gpn=2155&type=ArchivedSupplementPage&exact=115170

there appears to be no citation (at least, I haven't found one)

From Lost Bomber Website

http://www.lostbombers.co.uk/bomber.php?id=9721

Lancaster ND345
Type Lancaster
Serial Number ND345
Squadron 156
X1D GT-C
Operation Stuttgart
Date 1 20th February 1944
Date 2 21st February 1944


Further Information
"Serial Range ND324 - NE181 This aircraft was one of 600 Lancaster Mk.111s ordered from A.V.Roe (Chadderton) and delivered from Dec43 to May44 with Merlin 38 engines. ND345 was delivered to No.7 Sqdn ex-32MU Jan44, joining No.156 Sqdn 15Feb44. ND345 undertook no Key Raids whilst serving with No.7 Sqdn, but with No.156 Sqdn took part in the Key Raid against Leipzig 19/20Feb44. No record of total hours. Airborne 0024 20feb44 from Warboys. Homebound, at 20,000 feet, passing S of Mannheim, hit by Flak and exploded, throwing clear F/L Mackay. Those killed are buried in Rheinberg War Cemetery. F/L Petrides had flown a full tour with No.50 Sqdn, his award being Gazetted 13Mar42. S/L Muir was the Sqdn Gunnery Leader. F/L Mackay had flown 32 sorties. F/L D.K.MacKay DFC RCAF PoW Sgt J.C.L.Reed KIA P/O R.Halperin DFC KIA Sgt G.P.Roche KIA F/L B.O.Petridge DFM KIA F/O J.Moffat DFC KIA S/L A.Muir DFC KIA F/L D.K.MacKay was interned in Camp L3, PoW No.3612. "


Last edited by David McNay on Wed May 07, 2008 1:17 pm; edited 1 time in total
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David McNay
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:14 pm    Post subject: Margaret Sheila Grace Munro Reply with quote

Margaret Sheila Grace Munro had begun her apprenticeship in law, but volunteered for the W.A.A.F. when eighteen years of age. At school she had won the Wyllie Prize for History. Soon after enlisting she served in London during the blitz as a radio operator. She was killed in 1942 while proceeding on duty to the Orkneys.

Name: MUNRO, MARGARET SHEILA GRACE
Initials: M S G
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Aircraftwoman 1st Class
Regiment/Service: Women's Auxiliary Air Force
Age: 19
Date of Death: 19/08/1942
Service No: 2040886
Additional information: Daughter of the Revd. Alpine McAlpine Munro and Flora Hamilton McEwan Munro, of Kilmarnock, Ayrshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. E. Grave 227.
Cemetery: GLASGOW (CRAIGTON) CEMETERY
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David McNay
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:16 pm    Post subject: David Black Murdoch Reply with quote

David Black Murdoch served his apprenticeship as a carpet-weaver after leaving school in 1935. After service with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in 1945 he joined the Parachute Regiment and was posted to the Second Battalion in North Africa . Late in 1942 he was notified as missing, believed killed, in an operation the details of which were not disclosed.

Name: MURDOCH, DAVID BLACK
Initials: D B
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment/Service: Parachute Regiment, A.A.C.
Unit Text: 2nd Bn.
Age: 20
Date of Death: 30/11/1942
Service No: 2991875
Additional information: Son of James Murdoch, and of Mary Murdoch, of Kilmarnock, Ayrshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Face 35.
Memorial: MEDJEZ-EL-BAB MEMORIAL

The following information appears courtesy of the BBC Peoples War site. It was submitted by someone using the name "smcornriggs".

More details for smcornriggs here:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar/user/06/u522906.shtml

L/Cpl David B Murdoch: Lost In A Dry Land

Introduction

David Black Murdoch was my father’s elder brother and the uncle that I could never meet. He was killed in November 1942 (aged 20) whilst taking part in a fateful mission with the Parachute Regiment in Tunisia, North Africa. His body was never found. The details of the mission remained largely unknown for many years and I’m certain that neither David’s parents nor, in later years, my father knew the full circumstances of the events surrounding his death. Almost 60 years after this tragic event, I managed to trace one of the last remaining veterans of the mission and he was able to tell me what had happened. However, the story begins with some early childhood memories.

A Soldier’s Medals

As a young boy during the 1970s, I used to visit my grandmother on my father’s side every Saturday morning. She was in her late 70s and lived alone in a small block of flats not far from where I lived in Kilmarnock. I can’t remember the first time that my grandmother showed me the war medals that she had, but I do remember asking to see them during almost every visit. She would often pin them on my jumper and tell me to “march like a soldier” up and down her living room. There were 4 or 5 medals in total and my grandmother referred to 2 of them as “David’s medals”. The others had belonged to my grandfather who had served with the Army in India during WWI (a fact that I was to find out many years later). Thinking back to those times with my grandmother, I believe that she made a point of telling me which medals were David’s so that I would ask the inevitable question – who was David? She would explain that David was my father’s brother and that he had been killed during the war. She would then point to a framed photograph sitting on the mantelpiece of a young man in uniform and say, “That’s him”. I probably asked more questions about David until my grandmother had told me everything I wanted to know (and she wanted to tell me). I also believe that my grandmother got as much pleasure out of telling me about David as I did from wearing his medals and pretending that I was a soldier. Even though I was only aged 7 or 8, I could tell that she was very proud of him.

The Red Devil’s Story

Almost 30 years after those Saturday mornings spent with my grandmother, I took an interest in researching my family history. Thinking about my uncle one day, I wondered if I would be able to trace anyone who knew him, or who had served with him in the Parachute Regiment. My grandmother and my father had both passed away during the intervening years and they had never really spoken much about him. I decided to write to the Letters Page of one of the main daily newspapers in Scotland, asking anyone who knew my uncle to contact me. A few days later, I was delighted to receive a phone call from an elderly gentleman who had served in the same battalion as my uncle and who would be pleased to tell me all he could about that fateful mission in Tunisia. These are the words of Andrew Young, veteran of the Oudna Airfield mission:

"The 2nd Battalion, Parachute Regiment sailed from Greenock on 1st November 1942 and my Company (C Company) sailed on the Strathmore, accompanied by several other ships. We were bound for Algeria, arriving at Algiers on 12th November 1942. Under the command of Lt. Col. John Frost, the battalion marched approximately 10 miles from Algiers to Maison Blanche and used a school there as a base until Lt. Col. Frost received orders for an operation in Tunisia. Our mission was to destroy German aircraft at Oudna airfield, then to move off to the northwest and join up with the armoured forces of the First Army in the St. Cyprien area.

The battalion of 530 men boarded approximately 40 American Dakotas at midday on the 29th November 1942 and we took off from the airfield at Maison Blanche. We flew over the Atlas Mountains before descending to a height of 600ft in preparation for being dropped near Depienne. Lt. Col. Frost was in the leading Dakota and he dropped first, followed by the rest of the battalion. During the landing one man was killed when his parachute failed to open and a few were injured. Major John Ross led C Company, and we were tasked with securing the area to the south of the drop zone, including the road leading southeast to Zaghouan. We also had to recover the parachutes and weapons containers.

Lt. Buchanan of C Company was tasked with gathering together men who had jumped south of the drop zone and hadn’t yet joined up with the battalion at Depienne. Once these men had been grouped, they were to evacuate those injured during the landing that were being cared for at a school in Depienne, and then rejoin the rest of the battalion. As things turned out, Lt. Buchanan and his men were attacked by German forces and, after an exchange of fire during which many paras were wounded, they were forced to surrender, hopelessly outnumbered by the Germans. I remember hearing that after the paras surrendered a German captain handed them over to the Italian Army and they were led to a nearby farmhouse. A jeep carrying a high-ranking German officer approached and he ordered the Italians to shoot the paras. They were lined up against a wall and were about to be shot when an armoured car pulled up. A commander of the German Fallschirmjager (Parachute Regiment) got out the car and had an angry discussion with the high-ranking officer. The commander eventually turned to the paras and told them that they were prisoners of war and would be treated as such – he basically saved their lives.

In the early hours of 30th November, C Company lead the battalion on the way to Oudna. We took a route through the hills and the march was very difficult due to the terrain. After approximately 12 miles we stopped for a rest, but it was a cold night and the decision was made to set off again just after 07.00 hours with B Company leading the way this time. By late morning we reached a plain overlooking Oudna airfield and we stopped again whilst Lt. Col. Frost considered his options. He decided that A Company should move towards Oudna and occupy the airfield. However, in the process of carrying out this manoeuvre they came under attack at Sidi Bou Sakouma and suffered casualties. C Company was moved to join up with A Company and assisted to recover the position, with the Germans retreating northwards. Not long after 16.00 hours, C Company took over a farmhouse at Tete Amont de Siphon, whilst another part of the battalion moved to occupy Oudna railway station. When A Company eventually reached Oudna airfield they found that there were no aircraft there to be destroyed.

As we were awaiting further orders at the farmhouse at Tete Amont de Siphon, German tanks approached from the west and attacked us with heavy shell and machine gun fire. Then we came under air attack from two Messerschmitt 109s that appeared on the scene and made several passes at low-level with their machine guns firing. We were ordered not to fire at the fighter planes, as we had to conserve our ammunition. During one of the low-level passes made by the Me 109s, I was shot in the right leg and later captured by a Romanian soldier of the German Fallschirmjager.

After being captured, I was transferred to what I can only describe as a dungeon, somewhere in Italy, where I remained for 3 months. I was then admitted to a military hospital as the wound in my leg hadn’t been treated properly and gangrene was beginning to set in. I was hospitalised for almost 1 year and have the skill of an Italian doctor to thank for saving my leg. After being released from hospital, I was transferred to a POW camp in Germany where I remained for almost 2 years until the end of the war.

In the days that followed after I was captured, the battalion, particularly C Company, suffered heavy casualties as they fought their way to the safety of the British First Army positions at Medjez-El-Bab. In total, 16 officers and 250 NCOs, many of them Scots, were killed, injured or captured during the operation. It had been badly planned and based on inaccurate information that resulted in us being dropped into an area surrounded by German and Italian forces backed with armoured support. The fact that there were no aircraft at Oudna airfield meant that the operation had been completely unnecessary."

From Andrew’s account of the operation, we agreed that it was most likely that my uncle had been killed during the armoured tank and air attacks on C Company at Tete Amont de Siphon late in the afternoon of Monday 30th November 1942. I later obtained records from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission that confirmed that 22 men had been killed on that day from a total of 34 men of the 2nd Battalion plus 1 man of the Royal Army Medical Corps (attached to the 2nd Battalion) who were killed during the 5 days that the operation lasted. Bodies were recovered and positively identified for only half of all those killed and they were buried in Enfidaville, Massicault and Medjez-El-Bab War Cemeteries. However, within these cemeteries there are a total of 603 individual graves for unidentified members of the allied forces killed during the African Campaign. Commonly referred to as “unknown soldiers”, it’s possible that my uncle’s body lies within one of these graves. I will never know.

Originally posted here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar/stories/64/a2073764.shtml


Last edited by David McNay on Tue May 06, 2008 1:47 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:17 pm    Post subject: Donald John Nicholson Reply with quote

Donald John Nicholson, a Stewarton boy, left school in 1935 and was employed for some time as an insurance clerk in London. Soon after War was declared he joined the R.A.F. After training in Canada he returned to this country and was posted so South-East Asia. On an operational flight in July 1945 the aircraft of which he was navigator was hit and forced into the sea. The rescue craft failed to find him.

Name: NICOLSON, DONALD JOHN
Initials: D J
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Warrant Officer
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Unit Text: 110 Sqdn.
Date of Death: 17/07/1945
Service No: 1325437
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Column 449.
Memorial: SINGAPORE MEMORIAL

Listed on the Stewarton War Memorial
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David McNay
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:19 pm    Post subject: Robert Anderson Peacock Reply with quote

Robert Anderson Peacock, of Dunlop, was a promising schoolboy footballer. At the age of sixteen he had signed with Neilston Juniors and was playing with Kilbirnie Ladeside before he joined the Royal Marines in 1940. He was reported missing, believed killed, while serving with Force “Viper” on the Irrawaddy at Padaung in 1942.

Name: PEACOCK, ROBERT ANDERSON
Initials: R A
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Marine
Regiment/Service: Royal Marines
Unit Text: R.M. Group, M.N.B.D.O.1.
Age: 21
Date of Death: 24/04/1942
Service No: CH/X 100916
Additional information: Son of Laurence C. Peacock and Catherine Binnie Peacock, of Dunlop, Ayrshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 84.
Memorial: CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL

Listed on the Dunlop War Memorial
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:20 pm    Post subject: Robert Picken Reply with quote

Robert Picken left school in 1939. He was an enthusiastic golfer; his prowess won him a cup in that year. After a short period of employment in the Public Assistance Office he entered the Navy. He lost his life on the 26th of December 1943. On that day H.M.S. Saumarez , in which he was serving as a Petty Officer, took part in the action which led to the sinking of the German battleship Scharnhorst.

Name: PICKEN, ROBERT
Initials: R
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Petty Officer Radio Mechanic
Regiment/Service: Royal Navy
Unit Text: H.M.S. Saumarez
Age: 22
Date of Death: 26/12/1943
Service No: P/MX 116325
Additional information: Son of Archibald and Elizabeth Picken, of Kilmarnock, Ayrshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 78, Column 3.
Memorial: PORTSMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL

From Wikipedia

"Early on 26 December the Admiralty signalled that the Scharnhorst was at sea. She was detected by the cruisers and after some hours trying to evade them and strike at the convoy, headed for home. She was intercepted and hit by the Duke of York and a long chase followed. In the ensuing action, the Saumarez's guns fired continuously for eleven minutes, followed by torpedo attacks. A shell from the Scharnhorst, which did not explode, passed through the Director Control Tower, killing three men and putting the tower out of action
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:22 pm    Post subject: Henry Pringle Reply with quote

Henry Pringle entered the General Post Office, Kilmarnock, in 1936, and became a sorting clerk and telegraphist. In this latter capacity he joined the Navy. He was lost in H.M.S. Hecla when this was torpedoed off Casablanca on the 12th of November 1942. He was twenty-one years old.

Name: PRINGLE, HENRY GORDON
Initials: H G
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Ordinary Telegraphist
Regiment/Service: Royal Navy
Unit Text: H.M.S. Hecla
Age: 21
Date of Death: 12/11/1942
Service No: P/JX 270693
Additional information: Son of John D. and Annie Pringle, of Kilmarnock, Ayrshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 67, Column 1.
Memorial: PORTSMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL

From U-Boat net

http://www.uboat.net/allies/merchants/2417.html

HMS Hecla (F 20)
Type: Destroyer tender (Hecla)
Tonnage: 10.850 tons
Completed: 1941 - John Brown & Co Ltd, Clydebank
Owner: The Admiralty
Homeport: N/K
Date of attack: 12 Nov, 1942

Fate: Sunk by U-515 (Werner Henke)
Position: 35.43N, 09.54W - Grid CG 8830
Complement: 847 (279 dead and 568 survivors).
Convoy: Torch
Route: Simonstown - North Africa

History
On 15 May 1942, HMS Hecla (F 20) struck a mine laid by Doggerbank off Capetown. The explosion hit amidships, put the steering gear out of action and caused a big leak. The ship was towed by HMS Gambia to Simonstown, where she was repaired for 18 weeks. 24 crew members were lost.

Notes on loss
At 00.15 hours on 12 Nov, 1942, U-515 fired a spread of four torpedoes at HMS Hecla(F 20), which was misidentified as a Birmingham class cruiser and hit her in the engine room. Two torpedoes were surface-runner and the last also malfunctioned and was a circle-runner. The U-boat then hit the ship with three coups de grâce at 01.28, 01.49 and 02.06 hours, sinking the vessel.
At 02.11 hours, U-515 fired two torpedoes and badly damaged the escorting HMS Marne (G 35).
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David McNay
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:29 pm    Post subject: Clifford Prophet Reply with quote

Clifford Prophet came to Kilmarnock Academy from Darvel. He was of a reserved nature, and his kindly disposition was best known by a few intimate friends. He went to Glasgow University in 1933, and graduated with First Class Honours in Classics in 1937. He then went to Jordanhill to train for a teaching career. Very early in the War he joined the R.A.F., and was killed on operations.

Name: PROPHET, CLIFFORD BEATY
Initials: C B
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Sergeant (Flt. Engr.)
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Unit Text: 83 Sqdn.
Date of Death: 08/07/1944
Service No: 1365162
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Coll. grave.
Cemetery: BROUE COMMUNAL CEMETERY

Listed on Darvel War Memorial

From Lost Bombers Website

http://www.lostbombers.co.uk/bomber.php?id=7995

Lancaster ND966
Type Lancaster
Serial Number ND966
Squadron 83
X1D OL-C
Operation St Leu d'Esserent
Date 1 7th July 1944
Date 2 8th July 1944


Further Information
"Serial range ND324 - NE181 This aircraft was one of 600 Lancaster Mk.111s ordered from A.V.Roe (Chadderton) and delivered from Dec43 to May44 with Merlin 38 engines. ND966 was delivered to 32MU Apr44 and No.83 Sqdn May44. ND966 also took part in the Key Raids against Brunswick 21/22May44 and Wesseling 21/22Jun44. When lost this aircaft had a total off 88 hours. Airborne 2241 7Jul44 from Coningsby to attack the flying-bomb storage site at St Leu. Crashed in the region of B_ (Eure-et- Loire), 12 km NE of Dreux, where Sgt Mellard is buried in the local cemetery, and Broue, a village 7 km SSE of B_, where all the others kiled are buried. F/O F.Griffiths DFC KIA Sgt C.B.Prophet KIA F/S W.F.Asker KIA F/S G.J.O Martin KIA F/S E.T.Davis PoW Sgt R.Heslop Evd Sgt R.H.Mellard KIA F/S E.T.davis initially evaded until captured in Paris 7Aug44. Incarcerated in Fresnes Prison until interned in Camp L3, PoW No.8084. "
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David McNay
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:32 pm    Post subject: James Ridley Reply with quote

James Ridley was a pupil of Kilmarnock Academy from 1928 to 1940. He was a good rugby player and a serious philatelist. He achieved the rank of Company Sergeant Major in the School Cadet Corps. After a short time as a laboratory assistant he entered the Army as a subaltern of the 1st Bn., The Royal Scots Fusiliers. He was killed while on patrol in Burma in 1944.

Name: RIDLEY, JAMES
Initials: J
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment/Service: Royal Scots Fusiliers
Secondary Regiment: Royal Berkshire Regiment
Secondary Unit Text: attd. 2nd Bn.
Date of Death: 28/12/1944
Service No: 302890
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: 19. B. 17.
Cemetery: TAUKKYAN WAR CEMETERY
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:34 pm    Post subject: Robert Macdonald Ronaldson Reply with quote

Robert Macdonald Ronaldson, of Girdle Toll, spent two years with us. On leaving school he joined the Police Force and gained the rank of Sergeant. Joining the R.A.F. early in the War he specialised in navigation. He was killed in a flying accident in 1943. He was then thirty years of age.

There seems to be an error somewhere with regards to his first name.

Name: RONALDSON, RONALD MCDONALD
Initials: R M
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Sergeant (Air Bomber)
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Date of Death: 25/07/1943
Service No: 1046940
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Plot C.C. Grave 144.
Cemetery: IRVINE (KNADGERHILL) CEMETERY
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:35 pm    Post subject: John Scott Reply with quote

John Scott, a Darvel boy, played football for the school. He was greatly interested in the Literary and Debating Society, and loved music. Enlisting as an infantryman he was soon commissioned and was posted to the 11th Bn. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. He was killed when a mine exploded during training.

Name: SCOTT, JOHN
Initials: J
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment/Service: Royal Scots Fusiliers
Unit Text: 11th Bn.
Age: 27
Date of Death: 07/12/1943
Service No: 268879
Additional information: Son of James and Elizabeth Johnstone Moore Scott, of Darvel.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Grave 343.
Cemetery: DARVEL OLD CEMETERY

Listed on Darvel War Memorial
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:37 pm    Post subject: Alan Black Sim Reply with quote

Alan Black Sim, of Stewarton, after two years as Kilmarnock Academy, went to work in his father's business. He later joined the Fleet Air Arm. While he was flying in the summer of 1944 from Machrihanish to Kirkwall to join H.M. Aircraft Carrier Victorious, the plane in which he was crew crashed near Crieff. He was twenty years old.

Name: SIM, ALAN BLACK
Initials: A B
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Leading Airman
Regiment/Service: Royal Navy
Unit Text: H.M.S. Victorious.
Age: 20
Date of Death: 28/05/1944
Service No: FX87037
Additional information: Son of William and Annie Black Sim, of Stewarton.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. D. Block 241. Grave 671.
Cemetery: STEWARTON CEMETERY

He is listed on the Stewarton War Memorial along with his brother Robert
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:38 pm    Post subject: Robert Black Sim Reply with quote

Robert Black Sim, elder brother of Alan, who also worked with his father in Stewarton, joined the R.A.F. (V.R.) at the beginning of the War. He became Sergeant Pilot. The aircraft which he commanded failed to return from operations over the North Sea, and he was posted missing, believed killed, on 11th August 1940.

Name: SIM, ROBERT BLACK
Initials: R B
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Unit Text: 111 Sqdn.
Age: 23
Date of Death: 11/08/1940
Service No: 742609
Additional information: Son of William W. and Annie Sim, of Stewarton, Ayrshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 19.
Memorial: RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL

He is listed on the Stewarton War Memorial along with his brother Alan
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:40 pm    Post subject: John James Smith Reply with quote

John James Smith, of Wyllieland, Fenwick, was six years with us and won the medal for Commercial Subjects. His ambition was civil aviation, but he spent two years as home on the farm before joining the R.A.F.

Sergeant Pilot of a reconnaissance aircraft, he was reported missing from a photographic sortie over Holland in 1942.

Name: SMITH, JOHN JAMES
Initials: J J
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Unit Text: 2 Sqdn.
Age: 21
Date of Death: 29/12/1942
Service No: 1368998
Additional information: Son of Hugh and Agnes Smith, of Fenwick, Ayrshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 93.
Memorial: RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL
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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7649
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 9:43 pm    Post subject: Don Strachan Reply with quote

Don Strachan, eleven years a pupil as the Academy, was a violinist in the School Orchestra and entered generally into all school activities. He left in 1937 to become a motor mechanic. As Petty Officer at the Royal Naval Barracks, Devonport, he was killed during an air raid in 1941. He was twenty years old.

Name: STRACHAN, ADAM DON
Initials: A D
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Motor Mechanic
Regiment/Service: Royal Navy
Unit Text: H.M.S. Drake
Age: 19
Date of Death: 21/04/1941
Service No: D/MX 78777
Additional information: Son of William and Christine Gillespie Strachan, of Kilmarnock, Ayrshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. C. Cons. Grave 18002.
Cemetery: PLYMOUTH (WESTON MILL) CEMETERY
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