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David McNay
Curator


Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7654
Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Dec 19, 2006 8:12 am    Post subject: What's your area of interest? Reply with quote

We all have our own specific areas of research or interes. What's yours?

I'm currently researching Scottish casualties from the Boer War. I'm also researching the Roll of Honour for the two World Wars for HBOS plc.
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Barrie Duncan



Joined: 16 Dec 2006
Posts: 38
Location: Hamilton

PostPosted: Tue Dec 19, 2006 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm pretty much interested in WW1 in general, with a strong emphasis on Scottish Regiments. In particular I'm currently (when I have time) researching the men of the 10th Battalion Gordon Highlanders - if you have a 10th Gordon on your local memorial, be sure to let me know Wink
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DerekR
Moderator


Joined: 19 Dec 2006
Posts: 2974
Location: Hawick, Scotland

PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2006 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm currently researching information for an updated book on the story of the men of Hawick and her surrounding villages who fought and fell in the Great War.
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Adam Brown
Curator


Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 7369
Location: Edinburgh (From Sutherland)

PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2006 1:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I started researching one memorial, Brora in Sutherland, that then spread to the whole county.

I'm also trying to compile a complete list of all Scottish War memorials which I'll probably post another message about.

I'm a bit of a war memorial spotter / anorak and given half a chance will try and snap a photo of any war memorial wherever I am.

Regards

Adam
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AB64



Joined: 20 Dec 2006
Posts: 33
Location: Wishaw

PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2006 10:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,
My main area of interest is the Battle of Arnhem, and of late I have been trying to compile a list of Lanarkshire Men who fought their. I also have a strong interest in the British Army in NW Europe 1944-45 and a more general interest in the British Army at other points of WW2 and in WW1.

Cheers

Alistair
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Jim Murray



Joined: 21 Dec 2006
Posts: 27
Location: Vermont, USA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2006 2:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am a new member and a medal collector, principally medals of the Victorian era with a particular emphasis on the Gordon Highlanders in the Boer War.

Some men whose medals I am a caretaker of, died in the service of their country and I am interested in finding out more about their lives and any memorials to them.

If I can provide any information regarding medals to men you may have an interest in please don't hesitate to contact me

Jim
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apanderson
Administrator


Joined: 21 Dec 2006
Posts: 2565
Location: Stirlingshire

PostPosted: Fri Dec 22, 2006 3:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For the past few years I've been a volunteer photographer for the British War Memorial Project.

To date I've found the names of many men & women not on their database and for that matter, not listed on the CWGC site either.

It's an extremely fulfilling hobby - albeit a bit obsessive as I can't content myself till I've read and re-read every single inscription on every single stone - just in case!

Anne
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DerekR
Moderator


Joined: 19 Dec 2006
Posts: 2974
Location: Hawick, Scotland

PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2006 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

apanderson wrote:

It's an extremely fulfilling hobby - albeit a bit obsessive as I can't content myself till I've read and re-read every single inscription on every single stone - just in case!

Ohhh I know that feeling!
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Borden Battery



Joined: 23 Dec 2006
Posts: 5
Location: Regina, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2006 2:50 pm    Post subject: CEF Study Group - Moderator Reply with quote

Hello Ladies and Gentlemen
23 December 2006

At the invitation of DerekR, who is also a member of the CEF Study Group discussion forum (I am one of the moderators), I have visited and joined your discussion forum.

I have three general areas of interest: researching my late Grandfather in the Borden Motor Machine Gun Battery (CEF), moderating part of the CEF Study Group and documenting and collecting recommended Great War websites for research use by myself and others. Regarding the latter, anyone is welcome to a free copy of this List - the listing is now over 500.

While I cannot commit to being on this discussion forum on a regular basis (I am retiring financially from work and returning to university for Graduate Studies), I will prepare an Abstract on this group and include it in the list of Recommended Websites maintained by the CEF Study Group. In this manner, we will be able to direct more members with specific interest to your discussion forum and advance the spread of knowledge on the broad topic of the Great War.

It has been many years since my younger brother and I were drinking is a small hotel called Houston House between Edinburgh and Glasgow. In the wee small hours of a foggy morning we were taken from the warm pub and hunted the rarely seen "haggish". For all our efforts, we only found some scarves from the Glasgow Rangers.

Regards
Borden Battery / aka Dwight Mercer from Regina, Canada

PS While my late Grandfather was born in England but moved to Canada as a young boy, on my mother's side (via Nova Scotia) the family is from Scotland. There is another branch of the family now from Iceland who visited your "Southern Lands" or Sutherland on a regular basis many years ago as part of our "Vikings". As a result, I would expect there are some very distant cousins among you. Smile
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Ian Riley



Joined: 24 Dec 2006
Posts: 3
Location: Warrington

PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2006 1:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I notice that Borden Battery said ...

While I cannot commit to being on this discussion forum on a regular basis (I am retiring financially from work and returning to university for Graduate Studies)

SNAP - must be catching

I have just retired from teaching, am following an MA course in WW1 Studies and am heavily involved with the Liverpool Scottish Regimental Museum. It is the last that brings me here as many of the expatriate Scottish soldiers of the 10th (Scottish) Bn King's (Liverpool Regiment) must be commemorated on Scottish memorials in their hometowns. We try, if we can, to record this on our database.

Ian
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Richard Sands



Joined: 21 Dec 2006
Posts: 24
Location: Suffolk

PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2006 8:09 am    Post subject: hello Reply with quote

My Father served with the Queens Own Cameron Highlanders and the Liverpool Scottish. I have an interest in Military history in general but, 51st HD and 5th Camerons in particular.

I try and get pictures of any memorials wherever i go. "Lest we forget."
_________________
RGS. www.keep-em-moving.co.uk
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Borden Battery



Joined: 23 Dec 2006
Posts: 5
Location: Regina, Canada

PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2006 11:03 am    Post subject: Retiring to Graduate School Reply with quote

Hello Ian
24 December 2006

Good luck on your MA on the Great War. If you wish (and open to anyone) to obtain a digital bibliography (with abstracts) of some five hundred (500) of the better Great War websites, online documents and discussion forums, just forward me your direct email address by Private Message.

This material, while predominately based on the Canadian Expeditionary Force but expanding to now include all units and elements of the Great War, may serve as a good research tool for you. Of course, I am always interested in expanding sections of the Scottish elements of the Great War.

Given the Holiday Season it may be a few days before I am back online, however, if you are interested I will forward the complete list in the Adobe pdf format.

After twenty fives years in floodplain management, aquifer protection, urban planning and most recently waste minimization - I am now able to take a substantial amount of time off to take a multi-discplinary MSc degree (Engineering and most likely Education). I would have loved to do an MA on the Great War but the History Department of my university is rather weak in this department.

Finally, while not specific to Scottish memorials and this discussion forum, here is my research outline that I use to keep me somewhat focussed on my research. Members of this discussion forum might consider something akin to this in the pursuit of their personal research goals. Of course, some weeks I totally ignore this material just follow discussion threads to wherever they take me.

Borden Battery
=============================

Research on Private Richard William Mercer (911016), C.E.F., Great War

Researching the background, movements, typical daily activities and battle actions of my late Grandfather (Pte. R. W. Mercer - 911016) in the Borden Motor Machine Gun Battery, later known as (C-Battery) of the 1st Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade from March 1917 until December 1918. In December 1918, he transferred to the 2nd Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade while undertaking occupation duties in the Bonn area of Germany until returning to Canada in May 1919.

At present I am documenting and transcribing battery and brigade war diaries of the 1st Canadian Motor Machine Brigade and the Borden Motor Machine Gun Battery within the Brigade. I have a secondary interest in the Yukon Battery within the Brigade.

The purpose of this query is to establish "new threads" of email contacts to both expand the personal research work. In return, I am prepared to freely share referenced material that I have accumulated. Wherever possible, I want referenced data. Respond if you have a direct interest or forward to a researcher involved in any of the following:

1) "B" Company (Coy). 196th Western Universities O.S. Battalion (O.S.), Canadian Expeditionary Force (C.E.F) formed at the University of Saskatchewan in April 1916. There were four (4) companies in the Battalion [U of Manitoba - A Coy., U of Sask. - B Coy., U of Alberta - C Coy. and UBC - D Coy]. I have a good copy of the B- Company photograph in front of the new tindal stone Admin. Building. This will be preserved and copied to share with interested parties. Seeking more info on this Company and the Battalion from its formation until disbanded in England into the 19th Reserve Battalion on 31 Dec. 1917;

2) Typical train schedules and any info on special troop trains across the Prairies in 1916 with a further interest in the movement of special troop trains to Halifax in late Oct and early Nov 1916;

3) More info on Camp Hughes (formerly Camp Sewell) near Brandon (Carberry), Manitoba (not to be confused with Camp Shilo). I have published photo album of most of the Battalions from 1916 including the 196th Battalion. I would specifically like to obtain details on the training regime with specific interest in the utilization of the battalion-sized trench system (still in existence) that was used for realistic situation training.);

4) Background info on in Military District 10 (Manitoba and NW Ontario) based out of Winnipeg for the 1914-1919 period. Both recruitment and demobilization activities;

5) Any details on the typical handling of troop trains at Halifax and details on a specific ship listed at S.S. Southland which transported the 196th Battalion from Halifax to Liverpool between 1-15 Nov 1916;

6) Movement and typical training activities, battalion training/war diary activities of the 196th Battalion in England during the 15 November to 31 December 1916 period;

7) Details on the operation of the Brighton Isolation Hospital in Nov-Dec 1916;

8.) At CAMP SEAFORD, SUSSEX, England, Private R. W. Mercer (911016) under Part 2 Orders was taken On Strength [TOS] by 19th Reserve Battalion by Major Rasmussen. I am interested in any detailed info on the training of the Canadian troops, the disbanding of the various recruitment battalions from western Canada and the activities of the 19th Reserve Battalion - especially between 1 January 1917 and 1 April 1917;

9) Private R. W. Mercer (911016) transferred from 19th Reserve Battalion to Machine Gun Depot by Major Rasmussen at SEAFORD, England. Seeking more information on the selection process of the Machine Gun Depot, confirmation it was also at Camp Seaford and Camp Crowbourgh, and specific details on the training regime at these bases. I have a copy of a 1951 Vickers Machine Gun training outline;

10) Details and information on the Machine Gun Depot/training school and typical training regimes at both Etaples and Canmiers, France between 1917-1918;

11) Research on brigade and battery movements, orders of battle and battle actions and 1CMMGB [specific interest in the Borden Battery] regarding: Battle of Hill 70, Battle of Passchendaele [October-November 1917], the actions of the 1st Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade at Villers-Bretonneaux (Ludendorff Offensive) with interactions with British/Australian units and the Last One Hundred Days progressing from the Battle of Amiens, the Drocourt‑Queant Line, Canal du Nord and the Marquoin Line with Brutinels's Brigade - Canadian Independent Force and the final push to Valenciennes and Mons. In addition, the post-Armistice movement to the Rhine and occupational force duties until returning to Camp Seaford in the spring of 1919.


12) The personal letters of Private Richard William Mercer (911016) of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, Borden Motor Machine Gun Battery of the 1st Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~brett/cmgc/rwm_letters.html


13) The out of copyright book entitled "The Canadian Emma Gees" which documents the history of actions of Canadian machine gunners [Emma Gees] has been transcribed and placed on the same New Zealand based website. The objective of this exercise was to protect existing original books from loss or damage and to make the material available to researchers outside major centres.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~brett/cmgc/emmagees/mgcov.html


14) Any information pertaining to trench maps, barrage maps, movement maps, hospital and casualty clearing stations for the Canadian Expeditionary Force between 1916 and 1919.


15) Recommended Reading List on the Canadian Expeditionary Force

Marching to Armageddon - Canada and the Great War 1914-1919
Desmond Morton and J. L. Granatstein, Lester & Orpen Dennys, (1989)
A general overview book which provides a good initial overview of the conflict from a CEF perspective.

When Your Numbers Up - The Canadian Soldier in the First World War **
Desmond Morton, Random House of Canada (1993)
This book details the training and life of a typical Canadian soldier.

The Journal of Private Fraser - Canadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1918 **
CEF Books, Edited by Reginald Roy, (1998)
An excellent, observant, personal journal on one man's direct experiences which remains contemporary.

Barker VC - William Barker, Canada's Most Decorated War Hero
Wayne Ralph, Doubleday Canada (1997)
Canada tends not to honour any war hero; Barker included.

Vimy
Pierre Berton, McClelland and Steward, (1986)
A classic, easy-read of one of the pivotal battles of the Canadian Corps.

No Place to Run - The Canadian Corps and Gas Warfare in the First World War
Tim Cook, UBC Press (1999)
Well written book which documents poison gas by and on the CEF; will become a classic reference text.

Shock Army of the British Empire - The Canadian Corps in the Last 100 Days
Shane B. Schreiber, Vanwell Publishing Ltd. (2004/1997)
A well written account by a current Canadian military officer [PPCLI] of the Canadian Corps and reasons for its sustained success breaking the Hindenburg Line during the last one hundred days of the Great War.

Canada's Army, Waging War and Keeping the Peace
J. L. Granatstein, Univ. of Toronto Press (2002)
A sound overview of many conflicts including the Great War.

Paris 1919
Margaret MacMillan, Random House, (2003)
A very well written and readable book with a great deal of information packed into it.

Passchendaele - The Sacrificial Ground
Nigel Steel and Peter Hart, Cassel Military Paperbacks (2000)
An extended series of personal accounts of the true horror of this battle extended battle in Flanders.

Official History of the Canadian Army in the First World War - Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1914-1919, Colonel G. W. L. Nicholson, C.D., Army Historical Section
[Note: Can be downloaded as a .pdf file and used for key-word searches. However, the pagination in the online document is different than the original document - therefore citations with page number references cannot be used.]
http://www.forces.gc.ca/hr/dhh/downloads/Official_Histories/CEF_e.PDF

The Canadian "Emma Gees - A History of the Canadian Machine Gun Corps
Lt.-Col. C. S. Grafton, The Canadian Machine Gun Corps Association, London, Ontario, 1938
- of specific interest to students of the Canadian Machine Gun Corps
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~brett/cmgc/cmgc_contents.html

Canada's Hundred Days - With the Canadian Corps from Amiens to Mons, Aug. 8 - Nov. 11, 1918.
J. F. B. Livesay
This is a remarkable on-line 1919 document contains some detailed and important information on the Canadian Corps' military activities during the Last Hundred Days and its interactions with both British and French army units. Information on specific Battalions and heroic individuals is extensive. This book also provides some significant insight into the detailed battle movements of specific units with some remarkable coordinations of attacking battalion movements with artillery which was far more sophisticated than just the “rolling barrage”. There is also [perhaps the first] an outline of modern tank tactics which may pre-date the written theories of both Liddell-Hart and Major Fuller.
http://www.archive.org/details/canada100days00liveuoft

Library and Archives Canada
Online source of both personal attestation papers and growing database of CEF war diaries. One can do on-line research of both a specific soldier and access a growing digital database of scanned war diaries and appendices.
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/war-military/index-e.html


CEF Study Group website
This website is a spin-off of the informal "Canadian Pals" group that formed on the Great War Forum in England but dedicated to the research and study of the British Expeditionary Force. While the material on the site is still limited, this also presents the opportunity to contribute information and influence its development.

The website URL is as follows: http://www.cefresearch.com/phpBB2/index.php
_________________
In memory of Pte. Richard Wm Mercer
Borden Motor Machine Gun Battery
1st Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade
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skye4



Joined: 26 Dec 2006
Posts: 2
Location: Long Island, New York

PostPosted: Tue Dec 26, 2006 5:40 am    Post subject: Greetings Reply with quote

I am a member of the Canadian Expeditionary Force Study Group (CEFSG) and see that one of our illustrious members and moderators has also joined, aka "Borden Battery" Smile I was directed to your forum by a posting on the CEFSG Forum. My interest is narrow at this time, pertaining to a Glaswegian, Francis Wm. Davidson Muir, who was on the census in Edinburgh in 1901, served for 3 years in the Argyll Sutherlands (not sure if regiment or territorials but am waiting to see if the British Archives in Kew have a late Christmas present for me, his service records from that tour!). Thanks to the very cooperative Canadian government, I have his service record from the Canadian Expeditionary Force, 29th Btn ("Tobin's Tigers) and know he was a sailor, prior to enlisting in Vancouver, British Columbia, 9 Nov 1914 and that he died on 19 April 1916 in the St Eloi Crate debacle. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial with all the other Commonwealth soldiers with no final resting place.

My question: would his name appear on any roll of honor or memorial in either Glasgow or Edinburgh, even though he was serving in a Canadian infantry unit when he died and is commemorated in Belgium? He did not win any special medals of valor, just the plaque and scroll and 1914-15 Star, for which many soldiers were eligible. To complicate matters, his next-of-kin's address, his mother's, was in Liscard, Cheshire, England when he enlisted.

I appreciate any help with this. I am just trying to leave no stone unturned in my research on him.

Your forum looks terrific. On my last trip to your wonderful country (too long ago), I took photos of various WWI memorials. But they are prints only. If you are interested and when I have the chance and can learn how to scan them in, I would be happy to contribute them to your forum.

skye4
_________________
Remembering Francis Wm. Davidson Muir, born in Glasgow, served in the Argyll Sutherlands and the 29th Btn, CEF. KIA near Ypres April 1916
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DerekR
Moderator


Joined: 19 Dec 2006
Posts: 2974
Location: Hawick, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Dec 26, 2006 4:10 pm    Post subject: Re: Greetings Reply with quote

skye4 wrote:

My question: would his name appear on any roll of honor or memorial in either Glasgow or Edinburgh, even though he was serving in a Canadian infantry unit when he died and is commemorated in Belgium? He did not win any special medals of valor, just the plaque and scroll and 1914-15 Star, for which many soldiers were eligible. To complicate matters, his next-of-kin's address, his mother's, was in Liscard, Cheshire, England when he enlisted.


St.Eloi was a debacle as you correctly state - my Great-Grandfather served with the 28th Bn. and he was lucky to survive that battle as his company suffered tremendous loss of life when the Germans blew up mines under them.

I've tried to look at the Attestation papers for Francis Wm. Davidson Muir to see where is listed as his place of birth. But the website link is currently keeping me out.

Having a Glasgow, Edinburgh and Cheshire connection may mean that we may have difficulty in tracking a memorial down for him. Sad
But I will certainly look out for him as I'm sure others will as well.
_________________

Time but th' impression stronger makes, As streams their channels deeper wear.
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skye4



Joined: 26 Dec 2006
Posts: 2
Location: Long Island, New York

PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2006 12:05 am    Post subject: RE: Muir and St. Eloi Reply with quote

Derek --

Thanks for your reply and offer to keep a look out for his name. In his Attestation papers, his birthplace is listed as simply "Glasgow, Scotland". I know that he was born at "98 Cedar Street" in Glasgow, 13 February 1882. At least by 2 April 1883 (when his sister was born) until 21 April 1890 (when his youngest sibling was born), the family resided at "170 Cathcart Rd, Evanhill, Scotland". (Where is "Evanhill", anyway??!) At some point, they moved to Edinburgh, as noted on the 1901 census. If it would make a difference, I might be able to track down his exact address (so you might know the parish) in Edinburgh. By the way, at his death, he was a L/Cpl and his regimental number was 76053. His mother's address when he enlisted was "22 St. Mary St, Liscard, Cheshire, England".

Your great-grandfather was indeed fortunate to survive that horrific action. If you are interested, I do have a listing of several articles/histories about St. Eloi. Just let me know.

I do appreciate your looking out for his name. This was a long-shot but one I felt worth trying. Smile If he were listed in some memorial or roll-of-honor, it might indicate a place that was significant in his or his family's life. I am hoping that the British National Archives will be able to help me fill in the huge blank of his pre-WWI life!

Cheers,
Jane
_________________
Remembering Francis Wm. Davidson Muir, born in Glasgow, served in the Argyll Sutherlands and the 29th Btn, CEF. KIA near Ypres April 1916
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