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IanA



Joined: 19 Dec 2006
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Private John A. Hogarth, 41834, served with the 12th Battalion Highland Light Infantry and was killed on 9/4/17 aged 26. On that day, Hogarth's battalion was attacking over a feature called 'Observation Ridge' - as they came to the crest, they were surprised to find that they were facing German artillery firing at point blank range. These guns did terrible damage but they were rushed and overcome. It is likely that Hogarth was killed in this action. He was the son of Andrew and Isabella Hogarth and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Private William Alexander Galloway, 911046, served with the 46th Battalion Canadian Infantry and was killed on 26/4/17 aged 38. He is buried at Bruay Communal Cemetery Extension. This cemetery was attached to a Casualty Clearing Station so it appears likely that Galloway was seriously wounded in the Battle of Arras and died there. He was the son of Frederick Turner Galloway and Jessie, and was born at Pleasants Schoolhouse, Jedburgh. He had served for five years in the Border Rifle Volunteers and Yeomanry but had emigrated to Canada to farm.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Private Thomas Jamieson Mabon, 29011, served with the 10th Battalion Scottish Rifles and was killed on 28/3/18 aged 26. The German army made a massive assault on British positions on 21/3/18 and this became known as the Kaiserschlacht or 'Emperor's Battle'. An unprecedented artillery bombardment combined with huge amounts of gas forced the British into a fighting withdrawal but although the line gave it did not break. The battle lasted until the 5/4/18 and it is likely that Mabon lost his life in this conflict. He was the son of Archibald Mabon, Oxton, and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Private James Young, 326587, served with the 9th Battalion Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders. He was killed on 4/4/18 aged 19 and is buried at Bienvillers Military Cemetery - almost certainly another victim of the Kaiserschlacht. He was a farm servant at Greatridgehall, the son of Jane Young and was awarded the 14/15 Star.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

2nd Lieutenant E.J.P. Roger served with the Royal Army Medical Corps and was killed on 19/7/18 aged 39. The son of George Stevenson Roger and Mary Walker of Aberdeen, he is buried in Mendinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Private John Mack, 201344, served with the 1/4th Battalion King's Own Scottish Borderers and was killed on 1/9/18 aged 28. At this time, preparations were being made for an attack on a spur of the famous Hindenburg Line called the Drocourt-Queant Line and he may have become a casualty here. He was a ploughman, born Makerstoun, the son of Thomas and Letitia Mack of Blakelaw. He is buried in Queant Road Cemetery, Buissy.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Private G. Moffat, 13483, served with the 2nd Battalion Scots Guards and died on 25/2/19 aged 27. He was the son of Gilbert and Euphemia Moffat and is buried in Makerstoun kirkyard. He perhaps died of wounds or, just as likely, was a victim of the influenza pandemic. He was awarded the 14/14 Star.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Private Frank Chapman Mack, 45583, 4th Reserve Battalion King's Own Scottish Borderers died in the Cottage Hospital, Liberton on 27/2/20 aged 21 and is buried in Makerstoun kirkyard. He was a ploughman at Manorhill and the son of Thomas Mack, shepherd, and Leitia Chapman. He was the husband of Isabella Goodwin and died of pulmonary tuberculosis.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Kelso Chronicle 14/11/19
"UNFORESEEN COMPLICATIONS"
A public meeting of those interested in the erection of a war memorial for Makerstoun parish, was called for Tuesday night in consequence of - as the bill and advertisement stated - unforeseen complications having arisen. The meeting was held in the schoolroom, and Mr W.R. Murray, Charterhouse, chairman of committee, presided over a very large attendance.
The Chairman, in his opening remarks, after apologising for the absence of Mr F.T. Galloway, the secretary, said - I am sure it is very gratifying to see such a large and representative gathering at this meeting. It shows, if nothing else, what a great interest is being taken in the erection of a suitable memorial to our glorious dead. At the same time, it gives us a full opportunity of fairly and dispassionately discussing the extraordinary position in which the Parish Council and committee now find themselves placed. I think most of you are aware that it was decided at the first general meeting, held in July, to have no separate church schemes, and that whatever we did should be representative of the whole parish and for one common aim. (Applause.) To that end both ministers of the parish were proposed for the committee, and agreed to act with the others appointed that night. Now, it may or it may not be that some impatience has arisen over apparent delay in carrying the scheme through, but it must also be apparent to all right-thinking men and women here tonight that whatever we did required most careful consideration. We had really nothing to go by, as really little had been done in the neighbouring parishes. Also you must be aware of the difficulty of getting a good attendance at meetings during the busy stress of harvest and with the potato lifting coming on immediately after. Nevertheless, we were gathering information and considering plans all the time, and finding out what our neighbours were doing or likely to do. And, after all when everything is said and done, are we much behind our neighbours? I think not. As I remarked before, an extraordinary situation has arisen, and I ask you to consider it fairly and dispassionately, so that we may yet come to an understanding. The parish minister, without any warning to the committee, of which he was a member has seen fit to take up a position on his own by advising his session to collect money and carry forward a scheme of erecting a memorial within the church, and for the Parish Church alone. Certainly no-one could find fault with any church commemorating its dead, but surely in a small community such a this one memorial is enough, and I, for one, say it should be raised where the passer-by can see that we have not forgotten the debt we owe. (Applause.) The poor remains of our gallant lads today are marked only by a simple wooden cross, symbolic of Him who knew neither caste nor creed. Surely no fitter place could be found to keep their memory green than in the little "God's acre" of their native parish. There that lettered stone may be looked upon with reverence by generations yet unborn. (Applause.) My friends, let us bury our poor, paltry, parochial differences, and let us do it now. (Applause.) Let us agree to give all our offering for one common object and one common aim, and much money, I can assure you, will be forthcoming. We cannot hope to emulate large and wealthy committees in effigies of marble or off brass, but let us do our best, and for heaven's sake let us agree over it. It will be to our everlasting disgrace if we fail to do our utmost best in erecting such a stone to keep for ever green the memory of those who died that we might live. (Applause.) Mr Murray concluded by calling upon Rev. W. M'Callum, the parish minister, to give an explanation of his conduct in the matter.
Rev. Mr M'Callum said he should have liked to have heard some more ammunition fired before he had spoken, but, in the first place, he should like to ask one or two questions. First of all, what was the date of the first meeting about the memorial?
The Chairman - 24th July.
Rev. Mr M'Callum - Why was there such a long interval between that and the first committee meeting?
The Chairman replied that at the first meeting, at which Mr M'Callum was present, it was agreed to postpone doing anything further until after harvest.
Rev. Mr M'Callum, after eliciting from the Chairman that the next meeting was on the 27th August, said that that seemed to him an incredibly long delay. He then asked if the chairman could tell him the date of the succeeding meeting.
The Chairman said he could not, as the secretary was not present.
Rev. Mr M'Callum - Well, I will tell you. It was called for 18th October, but no meeting took place. Would it not be natural to expect an explanation from you for your non-appearance on that occasion?
The Chairman - I was 7 or 10 minutes late, but you can't exactly depend upon a car. But why was the meeting so quickly finished up?
Rev. Mr M'Callum - There could be no finishing up, because there was no meeting. I accept your explanation with pleasure, but there were five of us present (including Mr Galloway), and, after waiting a quarter of an hour, we had to go away.
The Chairman said he had not had a single opportunity for explanation, because Mr M'Callum took action immediately afterwards; in fact, he took action before his resignation from the committee.
Rev. Mr M'Callum - I resigned on the first day the secretary was in the parish.
The Chairman said he did not think he was a quarter of an hour late, but if he had been he was very sorry.
Rev. Mr M'Callum - Had you made an explanation at the time I am perfectly sure that the "unforeseen complications" referred to in the bill calling this meeting would not have taken place. Proceeding, Mr M'Callum stated that he had a letter from the secretary, of date 20th Oct., in which he said that, owing to the failure of members of the committee to attend meetings, no business had been transacted, and that if there was not a better attendance at the next meeting he would resign his post as secretary.
After the Chairman had admitted that he had asked the secretary to send out this letter, Rev. Mr M'Callum further asked, in the event of the chairman failing to appear at a committee meeting, if he could not see to it to be his duty to explain at the earliest possible moment.
The Chairman - The secretary was absent from the parish, and I did not see the need for any special hurry.
Rev. Mr M'Callum - It was your clear, bounden, and courteous duty to give an explanation. Proceeding, he asked if it was the case that the chairman had put the secretary's name at the foot of the bills without his knowledge.
The Chairman - No.
Rev. Mr M'Callum - Mr Galloway says that you did.
The Chairman - It's the first I've heard of it.
Rev. J. Brown Young, U.F. Manse, said he had been present at all the meetings save one, and on that occasion he had sent an apology. At the last meeting Mr M'Callum submitted certain proposals which were approved of, and Mr M'Callum was empowered to inquire about designs and prices. The next thing they heard was that Mr M'Callum was collecting subscriptions for a memorial tablet within the Parish Church. He would like to ask Mr M'Callum if he could tell him the date of his session meeting.
Rev. Mr M'Callum saaid he could scarcely remember, but it was the Sunday evening before the 25th.
Rev. Mr Brown Young - If that is the case, what interval did you allow for Mr Murray sending an apology for his absence? Continuing, he said he understood that Mr M'Callum called the session meeting for the next evening after the abandoned committee meeting, and that at this meeting of session the question of the memorial was taken up. His point was that Mr M'Callum gave no time for Mr Murray to send an apology.
Rev. Mr M'Callum said that he had got a design, and he took it to the meeting which did not take place. He walked home with the design very despondently, and feeling it to be a distinct slur. As regarded the krk session meeting, he called it a fortnight previously, owing, he was understood to say, to a desire which had been expressed to have a tablet in the church. He told his session that, if no apology was forthcoming on the Monday, he would act for the good of the Parish Church.
Mr Quarry thought that the meeting should ask Mr M'Callum to forego the tablet in the church, and that he would agree to the memorial being placed in the churchyard. If the meeting was unanimous, he hoped that Mr M'Callum would agree to this.
The Chairman thought that the general wish was that the memorial should be outside the church, the principal reason being that there were two denominations represented in the parish, while there were many who never went to church. He felt sure that they would only too gladly join their subscriptions, and take any advice they could from the kirk session of the Parish Church. It seemed to be the universal idea that these memorials should be placed outside, where everyone could see them. (Applause.)
A show of hands was then asked of those who wished the memorial placed outside the church, and the vast majority of those present showed in this way their approval of an outside memorial.
The Chairman declared this carried, and invited Mr M'Callum to join in with the view of the meeting.
Rev. Mr M'Callum said that the chairman spoke as if a stone or slab in the churchyard had been decided upon, whereas it was really difficult to know what was meant. It seemed to him that the committee had decided nothing; in fact, they had showed themselves to be utterly incompetent, and to have a lamentable lack of interest. This position, he contended, was solely due to the want of explanation and apology on the part of the chairman. That day they had had a solemnity of two minutes, but, when his thoughts went to his own parish, and, found that, after a year had elapsed after the armistice was signed, nothing had been done towards erecting a memorial for the men who had fallen, the pity of it, the pathos of it was fearful beyond words. He was glad, however, that the Parish Church were doing something. There were, he might add, several people who had contributed to the Parish Church memorial who would not contribute to the parish memorial, and there were many members of the Parish Church who wished a tablet inside the church. The Parish Church, by the way, represented about 75 per cent of the families in the parish. In conclusion, he said that his conscience would not allow him to do anything without the concurrence of his kirk session.
The Chairman - Are there any members of the Parish Church session present who would care to say anything?
Rev. Mr M'Callum - The meetings of session are private.
The Chairman - I beg your pardon. Continuing, he said that he did not care what percentage of members of the Parish Church wished to have a tablet inside; he did not thing there were half a dozen dissentients in that meeting from the proposal to have an outside memorial, and there were many members of the Parish Church present. If Mr M'Callum would join in with them he felt sure that they would gladly meet him half-way. If he (the chairman) had made a mistake in not sending in an explanation of his absence from the meeting it was accounted for by the fact that he was not a business man, but they might at least give him credit for sincerity, and he would certainly do his level best and subscribe handsomely to carry the thing through. (Applause.) Might he ask whether Mr M'Callum and the kirk session would concede the point he had raised?
Rev. Mr M'Callum replied that he did not feel himself at all bound to do anything further. Several people, as he had already indicated, had contributed only because it was for a memorial within the Parish Church.
Mr Craw, Stodrig (to Mr M'Callum) - You led us to believe there was no other memorial, and that the other one was finished. I wouldn't have subscribed unless, and there are many others besides me. (Applause.) I was taken unawares.
Rev. Mr M'Callum (to Mr Craw) - Did I not say that it was for the Parish Church?
Mr Craw - Yes, but you said the other was finished.
Rev. Mr M'Callum - Didn't I tell you that the kirk session had decided to put up a tablet?
Mr Craw - You said distinctly that the other thing had fallen through.
Rev. Mr M'Callum - No; I did not. I said that I would have no more to do with it.
The Chairman asked if any who had subscribed to the tablet would be willing that their money should go for an outside memorial, and if there was any chance of an amicable agreement. Addressing Mr M'Callum, he asked him if he would fall in with the desire of the people if they wished to have an outside memorial.
Rev. Mr M'Callum - I can't answer for the kirk session, and I am not going to answer.
Mr Quarry said he did not think that Mr M'Callum would stand in the way of his own position in the parish, even if he did not get one or two subscriptions from outside. Let him consult his kirk session. They should all "dust the dust from their soles," and think what this memorial was for, and then, perhaps, they might come to a unanimous conclusion. (Applause.)
The Chairman said they might leave the matter as Mr Quarry suggested, and he hoped that the decision would be in the direction of having one memorial.
Rev. Mr M'Callum - There is a committee in charge. (A voice, "Incompetent," and laughter).
Rev. Mr Brown Young said that Mr M'Callum might put it before his kirk session, and let the committee know the result. The committee, he thought, had a perfect right to ask this, as they were certainly placed in a peculiar position - perhaps unique in Scotland.
The Chairman said that, if it was the wish of the meeting, they could have the committee rearranged.
Rev. Mr Brown Young then said that it would not be advisable to call another meeting until Mr M'Callum had communicated the result of the meeting of his kirk session.
Rev. Mr M'Callum - I am quite willing to do that.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 7:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On 30th April, 1920, the Kelso Chronicle reported a successful Sale of Work in the schoolroom on behalf of the war memorial fund. It was opened by the Countess of Ellesmere and there was a large attendance which included the Duchess of Roxburghe. Amongst the articles raffled that afternoon were two salmon, a large roast of beef, a sack of flour, a sack of oatmeal, a spade and a set of china. Miss Robertson, of Smailholm Post Office, won a nail-driving competition. A sum of 111 was raised which, together with over 100 in hand, meant that the memorial could be completed.
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IanA



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 7:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Kelso Chronicle 10/6/21.
One by one the parishes in the Border country are having their memorials to the glorious dead unveiled, and now the parish of Makerstoun has had its monument to the eleven brave men who fell in the recent war set up so the passers-by may not be allowed to forget the heroism displayed. The memorial, which takes the form of an obelisk of grey granite from Rubislaw quarry, has been erected in a commanding position by the wayside at the top of the hill near the schoolhouse, and directly opposite the road leading to the Parish Church and manse, and is surrounded by iron railings. On the front panel it bears the following inscription:- "In memory of the men of the parish of Makerstoun who fell in the Great War, 1914-1920. 'Their name liveth for evermore.'" On the side panels the names of the men who fell appear in the order in which they died.
The unveiling and dedication of the memorial, which has cost altogether about 250, and which has been tastefully designed and executed by Messrs J.R.&W. Campbell, builders, Kelso, took place on Sunday in the presence of a very large gathering, the weather, fortunately, being fine. The committee did well to ensure the services of Mr J.J. Bell-Irving, the new proprietor of Makerstoun House for the unveiling ceremony; while the work of dedication was entrusted to Rev. T. Craufurd Kirkwood, Trinity U.F. Church, Kelso. Amongst others present were the Earl and Countess of Ellesmere, Mertoun House; Mrs Bell-Irving; and Mr J.C. Scott, Broomlands. Col. Allan Stevenson (Provost of Kelso), Capt. T. Black, and Hon. Lieut. Arthur Middlemas were also present in uniform, with Corpl. N.R. Fairbairn as bugler - all from Kelso. A number of ex-service men were under the command of Lieut. Robert Rae, Sucklawridge; while a number of the school children, in charge of Miss Galloway were also in attendance.
At the outset Mr F.T. Galloway, Schoolhouse (secretary and treasurer to the committee) read a letter from the Duke and Duchess of Roxburghe regretting their inability to attend owing to absence from home. Apologies for absence were also sent from Rev. J. Brown Young, U.F. Manse; and Mr H.S. Roger, late of Manorhill. Psalm cxxi - "I to the hills will lift mine eyes" - was then sung, Miss Galloway leading the praise, and this was followed by the Lord's Prayer, said by Rev. Mr Kirkwood.
Mr John Watson, Greatridgehall, chairman of the Memorial Committee, said they were there to perform a very sad ceremony - the unveiling of the memorial in memory of the brave lads from their midst who had made the supreme sacrifice. Those who had known them intimately knew that they had fought gallantly on the fields of France, Gallipoli, the Far East, and other theatres of war, and their name would live for all eternity. He had now to call on Mr Bell-Irving to perform the unveiling ceremony.
Mr Bell-Irving said - Mr Watson, fellow-parishioners and neighbours - We are assembled today to perform a pious duty, to express our debt of undying gratitude to the eleven gallant men of Makerstoun who fell in the Great War. I feel much honoured in having been deputed by your committee to unveil this beautiful memorial, standing here high above the undulating valley below. These heroes, to whom this monument is dedicated, will never return to gaze over the country they loved so well, but their names are engraved on this stone so that the generations to come may know of their great sacrifice at the call of King and country. They made the greatest sacrifice of all: they gave their lives that their native land might remain free from the domination of an alien power. We owe to them and to the soldiers and sailors of the British Empire that our fields, our homes and our towns were not devastated and wrecked as in France. We owe to them, and to those who stemmed the enemy's cruel advance, that we should individually and collectively try our best to uphold the great traditions of our race. These soldiers - some of them mere lads - suffered all the miseries and horrors of the trenches and the fatigues and privations on the march. Border men have had to face many battles, and none have fallen more gallantly or in a better cause than these brave fellows whose loss we mourn today with their relatives. To the parents, widows and children who survive we exteend our heartfelt sympathy. We who are left to carry on in the crisis through which our war-weary country is passing must pull together and put forth our strength and best effort to steady and preserve our Empire from disruption from within. May I remind you of these beautiful lines:-

"Men of this place, let this of you be said,
That you who live are worthy of the dead;
These gave their lives that you may reap
A richer harvest ere you fall asleep."
The names of the men of Makerstoun who gave their lives are inscribed on this monument in the order in which they fell in the Great War in the cause of freedom and justice. I now ask you all with uncovered and bowed heads to hear me read the names:- Pte. William Mack, K.O.S.B., died 12th July, 1915; Pte Joseph Morrison Quarry, R.A.M.C., died 5th Sept. 1915; Pte. Arthur Luke, Scottish Rifles, died 26th March 1917; Pte. John A. Hogarth, H.L.I., died 9th April 1917; Pte. William A. Galloway, 46th Batt. Canada, died 29th April, 1917; Pte. Thomas J. Mabon, R.S. died 28th March 1918; Pte. James A. Young, A.&S.H., died 4th April 1918; 2nd Lt. Edward J.P. Roger, R.A.S.C., died 19th July 1918; Pte. John Mack, K.O.S.B., died 1st Sept. 1918; Pte. Gilbert Moffat, Scots Guards, died 25th February 1919; Pte. Frances C. Mack, K.O.S.B., died 27th February 1920. With these names still ringing in our ears, I now unveil this memorial to their glorious memory. Mr Bell-Irving then drew aside the Union Jack which veiled the inscription on the memorial.
Rev. Mr Kirkwood then addressed the company as follows:- Amid the peace of the Sabbath and the summer beauty of beneficent Nature we meet here, thrilled with memories of the greatest and most momentous war in the world's history. With abounding gratitude we think of the swift and universal response of our own nation and our allies to the call for the defence of liberty, justice, and civilisation in the world. Devoutly we render thanks to Almighty God for His unfailing mercy and goodness to us during the years of titanic warfare by land and sea. Never can we forget the debt we owe to our brave brothers and sons who - knowing the perils and sufferings and horrors in store - fought through the war and returned triumphant. Today we reverently and tenderly pay homage to the memory of those eleven heroes of this parish who fought and fell - who through death have passed from us, but "are alive for evermore." To have given their lives in a holy cause, to have obeyed the law of supreme love and self-sacrifice, is surely to have entered into the spirit of the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ. These heroes gave their best - their all - for human liberty. In their short lives they reached sublimer heights than mere wealth or social distinction. They gathered into one glorious hour the highest aspirations and achievements of the longest life. Inspired by lofty ideals of faith and freedom, they yielded up their lives. "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friend." We cannot but mourn their untimely death, and deeply sympathise with sorrowing relatives; yet, even amid our tears - as we reverently whisper their names - they pass before us amid a halo of honour and glory that fill us with gratitude and pride. They have solved the great problem of living and dying for the betterment of mankind. Long before the splendour of youth had been touched by the finger of Time, they have won the eternal youth and joy of the angels and the redeemed. They live on, not only in our hearts, but in the Master's fellowship. In cherishing their memory, may we share in their spirit of service and self-sacrifice and become truly worthy of those who have died for us!
"Jesus, Thou Prince of Life,
Thy chosen cannot die;
Like Thee, they conquer in the strife
To reign with Thee on high."
After an impressive dedicatory prayer by Rev. Mr Kirkwood, Corpl. Fairbairn sounded the "Last Post," the officers present standing at the salute, and then the 66th Paraphrase, "How bright these glorious spirits shine," was sung.
Mr Galloway said that, as secretary of the Parish War Memorial Committee, he had been requested to hand over the memorial to the Parish Council for safe keeping for ever.
Mr Watson, as chairman and in name of the Parish Council, said he had great pleasure in accepting the gift. The other members, as well as himself, would regard the safe custody of the memorial as a sacred trust and a high duty which would never be neglected in the years to come.
After Mr Bell-Irving had exchanged a few words with the ex-service men present, the impressive proceedings were closed with the National Anthem.
Several beautiful floral tributes were laid at the base of the memorial.
The arrangements were efficiently carried through by a committee consisting of Mr John Watson, Greatridgehall (chairman); Rev. J. Brown Young, U.F. Manse; Messrs W.R Murray, Charterhouse; W. Rae, Sucklawridge; G. Quarry, Makerstoun; and F.T. Galloway, Schoolhouse (who, as secretary and treasurer, is to be heartily congratulated on his efforts to secure the successful completion of the project).
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Adam Brown
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ian

Some very interesting information about the background to this memorial. It is great to see an article about a committee meeting too.

Thanks

Adam
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Adam Brown
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 6:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

IanA wrote:
Private William Alexander Galloway, 911046, served with the 46th Battalion Canadian Infantry and was killed on 26/4/17 aged 38. He is buried at Bruay Communal Cemetery Extension. This cemetery was attached to a Casualty Clearing Station so it appears likely that Galloway was seriously wounded in the Battle of Arras and died there. He was the son of Frederick Turner Galloway and Jessie, and was born at Pleasants Schoolhouse, Jedburgh. He had served for five years in the Border Rifle Volunteers and Yeomanry but had emigrated to Canada to farm.


On Twitter, William Galloway's great nephew has confirmed Ian's suggestion of the cause of death. "My Great Uncle William is on that memorial [Makerstoun]. WIA 27/4/17 died 29/4/17 with the CEF, emigrated 1905."
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kinnethmont



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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 7:21 am    Post subject: Private William Alexander Galloway, 911046 Reply with quote

Quote:
killed on 26/4/17 aged 38


He enlisted at Saskatoon 19th June 1916.
DOW at No. 22 CCS ( Shrapnel wounds left arm and abdominal wall ) on 29th April 1917
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Jim

If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

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IanA



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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 7:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Adam Brown wrote:
IanA wrote:
Private William Alexander Galloway, 911046, served with the 46th Battalion Canadian Infantry and was killed on 26/4/17 aged 38. He is buried at Bruay Communal Cemetery Extension. This cemetery was attached to a Casualty Clearing Station so it appears likely that Galloway was seriously wounded in the Battle of Arras and died there. He was the son of Frederick Turner Galloway and Jessie, and was born at Pleasants Schoolhouse, Jedburgh. He had served for five years in the Border Rifle Volunteers and Yeomanry but had emigrated to Canada to farm.


On Twitter, William Galloway's great nephew has confirmed Ian's suggestion of the cause of death. "My Great Uncle William is on that memorial [Makerstoun]. WIA 27/4/17 died 29/4/17 with the CEF, emigrated 1905."

Thanks for that - I don't tweet. Ah'm auld, ee ken? Good to know that there are relatives out there still taking an interest. I'm an organist who occasionally plays at Makerstoun and I thought the rather fractious story of the memorial deserved a write-up. I discovered that William's father, Frederick, resigned as Heritor's clerk on 15/5/21. I thought that it might be due to the unfortunate dispute over the memorial but the sole heritor, Scott-Makdougall sold up at that point and it may be that Galloway just thought it was a good time to go.
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