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Black Watch Boer War Memorial, The Mound
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David McNay
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Joined: 14 Dec 2006
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Location: Lanarkshire, Scotland

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2007 12:45 am    Post subject: Black Watch Boer War Memorial, The Mound Reply with quote

These are some of my photos taken when I had an utterly rubbish Konica digital camera. Next time I'm in Edinburgh I'll get some better pictures. I have photos of the names on the memorial but I need to sort them first.





I usually like to add a postcard if I have it to show how things have changed but apart from the fashions this area is pretty much as it was then.

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Adam Brown
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2007 8:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

According to last Friday's Edinburgh Evening news the One O'Clock Gunn Association is raising funds to restore this memorial:

http://edinburghnews.scotsman.com/index.cfm?id=378052007

I'm not sure it is Edinburgh's forgotten memorial as described in the article though. I'm sure a few others could hold that dubious honour.

The Association has a webpage but there is nothing on it about this statue.

http://www.oneoclockgun.org

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Adam
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Adam Brown
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2007 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here are some more photos. They are not very good so I haven't posted them before but they'll have to do until I can get better ones.









Adam
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2007 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is there any chance of better photos of the memorial + name panels in the near future. I know it was erected in Edinburgh because of Wauchope's connection but I'm keen to get ripped in about this one!
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Adam Brown
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2007 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dhubthaigh

I'll see what I can do about getting new photos. I should be able to make it to this memorial in a lunch hour.

Saying that I haven't been able to make it along to East Claremont Street for a memorial in about a month because of work and family commitments.

I'll try and get these asap.

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Adam
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David McNay
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2007 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have closeups of the names. There's a lot of duplication of my photos from this memorial so it took me a little while to go through them.

Apologies if there's more than one photo of the same thing here. Let me know if you want any more information on any of these names. I've got a few sources kicking around here...

Died of disease names:








Killed in action names:





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Adam Brown
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2007 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I took some close ups of the memorial a couple of weeks ago.

The bayonets were broken off in 1906 so don't blame the youth of today!

There is some good detail on the type of uniforms and equipment the Black Watch were wearing in the Boer War.









You'd probably get quite a good shot of the statue from the top of an open top tour bus. If your left standing at the foot of the monument it is very difficult since it is beside one of Edinburgh's busiest roads.





Adam
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Murray



Joined: 21 Jan 2008
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 10:05 pm    Post subject: The Black Watch Memorial on the Mound Reply with quote

The memorial has nothing to do with the One O'clock Gun association and is presently being restored, hopefully back to it's former glory.

If you are planning a trip to Edinburgh to see it then don't. It is surrounded by scaffolding and tarp for the restoration work. This work should be finished by the end of March beginning of April.

On completion of the work it is planned to hold a dedication parade to formally hand the memorial back to Edinburgh City.

Funds are still needed to help out.

The period between 1899 and 1902 was dominated by the South African or Boer War. Both the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the Black Watch took part in this war. It was however, the 2nd Battalion which was the most heavily committed.

In all, the Regiment lost fourteen officers and 194 other ranks during the war. Their names are commemorated on this magnificent memorial at the top of the Mound in Edinburgh.

If anyone reading this would like to help by making a donation the details are below. All help is extremely appreciated.

The address for all donations to the restoration of the Black Watch South African Memorial on the Mound is:

The Black Watch Association
Balhousie Castle
Hay Street
PERTH
PH1 5HR

Cheques and Postal Orders should be made out to: The Black Watch Association

MOD EDIT: Corrected the dates you'd put for the Boer War.
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Murray



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PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 10:16 pm    Post subject: Presentation to the City of Edinburgh - 25 June 1910 Reply with quote

Public sentiment in Edinburgh was deeply stirred by the ceremony which took place yesterday of the presentation to the Lord Provost and Town Council of The Black Watch Memorial on the Mound. The function recalled a double sorrow - the loss of the brave men who fell in the South African Campaign, and the death of King Edward. It will be remembered that the memorial when completed was unveiled with no attendant ceremonial on account of the Royal demise. Since the period of public mourning for the King has elapsed, it was decided that the monument should be given into the custody of the municipal authorities with due publicity and honour.

The presentation ceremonies were carried out with compete success, and with a military accompaniment which added greatly to their dignity and impressiveness. Fortunately the weather was of an agreeable character. A crowd estimated at about 5,000 filled the Mound and its environs, and they watched the proceedings with respectful attention. For the time being traffic was arrested, and the whole space of the street was available. Around the base of the Memorial had been erected a small platform, on which were accommodated those more immediately interested in the presentation. There was a guard of honour of 58 men of The Black Watch from Perth under the command of Lieutenant Fortune, stalwart figure in full regimentals and kilt. The band and pipers were from the 1st Battalion, Black Watch in Limerick. There were representatives from the 2nd Battalion, stationed in India, instructors from the Territorials associated with The Black Watch, and representatives of Edinburgh and other Black Watch Associations. Among the veterans of the Crimea and the Indian Mutiny were Sergeant Lillie, Corporal McRobbie, Thomas Paul, John Bryson, Wm Archibald Robert Sloan, George Maclean, and Thomas Mowat, all of whom were wearing their medals and clasps

THE COMPANY PRESENT

Lord Provost Brown appeared in his uniform as Lord-Lieutenant of the county, and there were many brilliant uniforms in his vicinity. The ladies present were generally gowned in black. Those on the platform and its neighbourhood included Mrs Wauchope, Niddrie, widow of General Wauchope; Mrs Tait, mother of the late Lieutenant F G Tait; Mr W A Tait, brother; Mrs H S Reid, sister; and Mrs J G Tait, sister-in-law; Mr Birnie Rhind, the sculptor; Lady Green; Sir Wiliam and Lady Dick-Cunyngham, Sir J H A Macdonald, KCB, Lord Justice Clerk; Sir John M Clark, Bart; Sir James Gibson, Bart and Lady Gibson; Colonel Sir Robert and Lady Cranston, the Rev Dr Robertson, DSO; Colonel Grogan, CB; Captain the Hon M C Drummond; Colonel Livingston, Perth: Colonel and Mrs Carthew Yorston, Colonel and Mrs Kidston Kerr, Mrs Brown and Miss Brown, wife and daughter of the Lord Provost; Colonel T Mowbray Barclay, Colonel Trotter, MVO; Miss Trotter, Colonel and Mrs Duff, Mr J L Ewing, Master of the Merchant Company; Mr R Addison Smith, MVO; Captain A G Wauchope, DSO; the Misses Hamilton; Mrs Pollock McCall, Mrs Stuart, Colonel Etheridge, DSO; Major C E Stewart, and Captain J Stewart.
When all had been assembled, a particularly fine scene was presented. The splendid memorial with its background of trees, showed extremely well on its excellently chosen site. A great throng of people crowded the surrounding slopes right up to the walls of the New College buildings and the Free Church Offices. From the Mound could be seen the fine stretch of Princes Street Gardens and the activities of the adjoining thoroughfare backed by the grouped mass of the city architecture. A tramcar on the way up the slope had been arrested as the ceremony was about to begin, and it was speedily packed with spectators. Photographic artists had taken up their positions, and they were busily engaged in securing views. Doubtless there were many in the crowd who had lost relatives in the South African campaign, and when the buglers sounded the Last Post, with which the ceremony began, there were not wanting evidences of emotion. The guard of honour presented arms, and the pipers played the “Flowers of the Forest,” which sounded like a dirge for the dead. The guard then sloped arms and stood at ease.

PRESENTATION CEREMONY

Colonel Grogan, commanding The Black Watch Brigade (T.), performed the ceremony of handing over the memorial to the Lord Provost. He expressed regret at the outset that General Sir John MacLeod, Colonel of The Black Watch, was unable, owing to the state of his health, to undertake the duty. In an allusion to the history of the movement which led to the memorial, he said they were deeply grateful to the directors of the Bank of Scotland, who had placed at their disposal such a suitable piece of ground for a site. The memorial was only completed and ready to be unveiled when a great national calamity in the death of the late King fell upon the country. The regiment decided that during the days of deep mourning for the late Sovereign, a formal unveiling ceremony would be out of place. The monument stood to commemorate General Wauchope and their comrades, who fell nobly fighting for their country. But the fame of such gallant men was not dependent on records graven in marble or bronze. Their fame was the cherished possession of every Scottish heart, and their memory would be revered and honoured in The Back watch as long as such a regiment existed. (Applause.)

Prayer was engaged by the Rev Dr Robertson, and all joined in singing the hymn “For all the Saints who from their labours rest.”

Lord Provost Brown accepted the memorial on behalf of the city. He recalled that in 1873 there was unveiled in Dunkeld Cathedral a monument to the memory of those in The Black Watch, who fell in the Indian Mutiny, and that 23 years ago, there was unveiled in Aberfeldy, another monument to the memory of those who belonged to the 42nd. They in Edinburgh were met to take over and care for the monument in bronze erected to the memory of the officers, non-commissioned officers and men who fell in, or died in, discharge of their duties in South Africa, men, who kept up the ancient prestige and unbroken good name of the regiment, men who were earnest, devoted soldiers of their Crown and country. Both men and officers performed deeds worthy of their reputation, and behaved like heroes, fighting hard for their country’s honour, and their memory would be recorded in the annals of the country. There were at least two with them that day, and there might be many others, who must be deeply touched by this display. He referred to Mrs Wauchope of Niddrie, widow of the gallant General, and Mrs Tait, mother of Lieutenant Tait. General Wauchope was in command of the Highland Brigade, and fought as a soldier, carrying out his orders loyally to the end. He was one of Scotland’s bravest sons. He died at the head of his gallant Highlanders, with his face to the foe. A man whom everyone loved, a perfect Christian gentleman. (Applause.)

They accepted the monument as a treasure to the city, and they would care for it and see that in all time coming, it would be respected by the citizens. He prayed that God might grant healing and comfort to the fresh wounds made on such an occasion.
With the playing of the National Anthem by the band, the proceedings terminated.
_________________________________________________________________


CORPORATION LUNCHEON

Letter from Lord Roseberry

Later a party of about eighty ladies and gentlemen were entertained to luncheon in the City Chambers by the Lord Provost, Magistrates and Council. The Lord Provost presided and the duties were discharged by Bailies Geddes, Lang, and Fraser. The company included Mrs Wauchope, Mrs Tait, and many of those already named, who had attended the principal ceremony of the day. Others present were the Hon Edward De Moleyns, Bailie Cullen,Baillie Stewart, and Colonel Berkeley. On the call of the Lord Provost, the toast of the King was honoured.
His Lordship next intimated that he had received the following letter from Lord Roseberry:-

Roseberry, Gorebridge, Mid-Lothian,

June 26 1910.

MY DEAR LORD PROVOST, - I am sorry that I cannot accept your kind invitation to the luncheon tomorrow, as I have to go to London tonight. I should have liked to pay homage to that admirable and delightful person, as well as gallant soldier, General Wauchope, - Yours, Roseberry.

The toast of the “Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)” was proposed by Sir J H A Macdonald, the Lord Justice-Clerk. The brave Black Watch, he said, had been well represented throughout the history of this country for the last 150 years. They could see themselves, by the presence among them of two ladies, that courage was not limited to those who belonged to the male sex connected with the Army. The late General Wauchope was esteemed by all of them in Edinburgh, a man who shone not only by his bravery and his skill as a soldier, but also as a citizen. He knew him well, and knew the other well too-poor Freddie Tait, whom they all remembered with regret. He could not look back without remembering his own uncle, after whom he had been named, Wellington’s Adjutant-General for twenty-two years, was in his (the speaker’s) boyhood made colonel of the regiment, and held that post until he died. Those who had looked into the history of The Black Watch knew well what a glorious history it had. Coming from a race that fought stoutly for the Stuarts, it was due to the genius of the first William Pitt, afterwards Lord Chatham, that we had today The Black Watch, esteemed for its past, honoured for its present, and full of hope for the future of its glories. (Applause.)

They knew that the regiment would maintain the reputation it had always had. The power of tradition was strong. The tendency every day was to remove out of the way the temptations to which the soldier was exposed. (Applause) None of them wished for a war. We all desired peace, but we did wish to have soldiers who, if we were compelled to defend our country and our homes, would be men like the men and officers of The Black Watch. (Applause.)

Colonel Livingstone, 2nd Battalion, Black Watch, Perth, who acknowledged the toast, apologised for the absence of Colonel Rose, commanding the 42nd. They of The Black Watch, he said trusted that the memorial, which had been erected, would not only be an ornament to the beautiful city of Edinburgh, but that to the ordinary passer-by it would be a symbol that would be looked on with the greatest reverence in memory of the gallant dead. (Applause) He concluded by proposing the toast to the Corporation of the city of Edinburgh.

Bailie Geddes had taken the chair on the departure of the Lord Provost to attend the gathering of the men of The Black Watch, and he acknowledged the toast.
Proceedings concluded with the National Anthem. _______________________________________________________________

THE GUARD OF HONOUR ENTERTAINED

A Visit from Mrs Wauchope

A luncheon to the Guard of Honour, the bandsmen and to Indian and Crimean veterans of the regiment was given by the Corporation in the Victoria Hall, Leith Street, Edinburgh. Bailie Smith Elliot presided, and was supported on his right by Major Stewart, 1st Battalion, and on his left by Lieutenant Fortune, who was in charge of the guard.
After the loyal toasts had been pledged, the Chairman extended a hearty welcome to the soldiers.
Councillor Cameron, in giving the toast of the regiment, said the day’s interesting and picturesque ceremony would be in some measure a redress for the undignified and unceremonious manner in which the memorial had been unveiled. (Applause) The Scottish people revered the memory of the men who fell in South Africa, and they might rest assured that the citizens of Edinburgh would ever cherish and keep green the laurels and traditions of the national regiments. (Applause)
Major Stewart, in reply, said they owed a very great debt to the city of Edinburgh. (Applause)
He could not recall all the times that Edinburgh had right royally entertained them. In connection with the memorial handed over that day the Corporation had offered to the Committee £300 to make additions to still further beautify it. That was a noble and generous offer, and he did not think they of the regiment could ever forget it. (Applause) He noted that the monument at Aberfeldy, the birthplace of the regiment, though struck by lightning the other day, had not been destroyed, only the base had been touched, and he thought that was a brave emblem of the men standing up to brave the storm. (Applause) It was also a good omen of the future. Out of the money raised for this memorial there were beds endowed in the new school for the sons of the regiment, and to that school he believed that they had seven nominations, which he thought was a fine memorial to those in itself, who had served in the past. (Applause)
Referring to what Councillor Cameron had said about the unveiling of the memorial, he pointed out that that had happened at the time of national mourning. He hoped too, that they were a modest regiment, who did not believe in bowing their own trumpet. (Applause) The Dunkeld monument had been unveiled without formal ceremony, and he thought that was true also of the Aberfeldy monument. It was done very quietly too. They had been criticised for the way the unveiling had been done, but in any case there had been no desire to hurt the feelings of any one. (Applause) It would please them all to know, wherever they might be that the Corporation of the capital of Scotland had the memorial in their keeping. (Applause) They of the Back Watch were a family regiment – only the other day he had seen old Sergeant Mitchell bringing in his seventh son – and he believed and hoped that the sons and grandsons would endeavour to maintain the traditions of their fathers, grandfathers, and even great grandfathers who had served before them, and would see to it that they always carried the red hackle high and did honour and credit to their tartan, (Applause) Wherever they served they would be proud to think that that monument stood where all could see it on their way to the old Castle. (Applause)
He proposed the health of the Lord Provost and Corporation, and prosperity to the city.
The Chairman replied.
At a later stage in the proceedings, Lord Provost Brown and Mrs Brown and Mrs Wauchope of Niddrie, paid a visit to the gathering, and were received in the most enthusiastic manner.
The Lord Provost, in addressing the men, said the widow of the great general had been gad to have the opportunity of looking in upon them once more, and showing her respect for many of those who had known her husband and trusted him right well. (Applause) He hoped the memory of the great and the good, who had gone would exert an influence for good over each one of them. Perhaps, he added, Mrs Wauchope would care to say a word to the men.
Mrs Wauchope, who spoke under considerable emotion, said she thought they all knew what the Black Watch meant to her, and she would just say “Thank you.” (Applause)
The scene when Mrs Wauchope sat down was an affecting one, and many, including some of the veterans, were visibly touched by the simple words of the widow of the old commander of the regiment.
There was another round of cheering as Mrs Wauchope left the hall, which she did immediately
After, and as she passed out she shook the hands of several of the men.
_____________________________________________________________


[EDITORIAL]

“AM FREICEADAN DUBH” – The Black Watch, the Royal Highlanders, the Old Forty-Second – is a modest as well as an illustrious and patriotic regiment. To its unwillingness to blow its own trumpet, and also to the gloom cast over it and the nation by the death of our late
Sovereign, which occurred shortly before the date fixed for the unveiling of the monument raised to the gallant men of the Black Watch who fell in the Boer War, had been set down the circumstance that a much valued addition to the historic memorials and works of art of the city was allowed to greet the public eye without introduction or ceremony. The omission has now been worthily amended. The sculptured tribute, raised upon one of the choicest of Edinburgh’s high places, in honour of one of the most renowned of Scottish regiments, was yesterday formally handed over to the custody of the Town Council. If the officers and men of the Black Watch be backward in drawing attention to its claims upon the affection and gratitude of their fellow -countrymen, especially those accumulated during the great struggle in South Africa, the city that boasts so many associations with its achievements and sacrifices was not minded to let the occasion pass so tamely. By the celebrations of yesterday honour was done to whom honour is due. It would be difficult to mention a public ceremony more interesting to the citizens of all classes than that over which the Lord Provost presided so admirably. The services rendered and the losses sustained by the Black Watch in South Africa are already a decade behind us. They are remembered with mingled pride and grief, as if they had been recorded yesterday. Among those who gave their lives for the Empire were not a few whose names were household words in the capital of Scotland. Special mention was made by the speakers at yesterday’s ceremony of General Wauchope and of Lieutenant F G Tait. To read these and other names chiselled on the monument at the head of the Mound is to renew an old sorrow; but it is also to strengthen and confirm the trust which the nation reposes in the intrepid spirit, the self-sacrificing devotion, the inextinguishable patriotism of the race to which these brave men of the Back Watch belonged. It is well that this record should be set in a place where future citizens and visitors who tread the historic slope between the Old Town and the New cannot fail to mark it. Nor is it without significance that the three most recent monuments reared within the bounds of the city, and ranged along the line of the valley that may be said to symbolise the gap dividing the ancient and the modern life of Edinburgh and Scotland, are all military in character. It is a reminder that the time is not yet in sight when we can afford to esteem lightly the old martial genius of the nation or lay aside our armour of defence.
The Black Watch monument is crowned by the figure of a stalwart kilted Highlander standing on guard, and looking in the direction of the Castle and the western hills. The years that have passed since 1737, when the regiment was embodied beside Wade’s Bridge over the Tay at Aberfeldy may have brought among other changes, a shifting of the points of the compass from which we must look for national trouble and peril. The Black Watch may itself be regarded as a monument of the close of the period of Civil Wars and Rebellions within our island, through which, if the nation suffered terrible calamities, it was also tempered and welded for greater purposes and nobler services at home and abroad. The embodiment of the “Freiceadan Dubh” was also the beginning of the process, which some may think not yet absolutely compete, of the pacification and settlement of the Highlands. It was, as the Lord Justice-Clerk noted, among the first fruits of the statesmanship of the elder Pitt, who had the wisdom to test whether the faith, courage, and devotion, and the other high qualities that had been enlisted in the cause of the Stuarts could not be employed in the work of defending and extending the Empire. From its earliest annals down to its latest experience of active campaigning the record of the Back Watch has been a brilliant vindication of Pitt’s bold and far-seeing policy. The regiment has made its mark in nearly every war in which the country has been engaged and in every region where the British flag has been planted. It is right that it should have its stones of remembrance set up in the land and among the people from whom it has sprung. The memorials already raised at Aberfeldy and Dunkeld are fitly paced on sites and amid surroundings that are associated with its origin and early exploits; and it may be noted as a curious coincidence – in which the first recruits of the Black Watch might have detected something other than chance - that almost simultaneously with the unveiling of the monument on the Mound the cairn and figure at Aberfeldy have been struck and damaged by lightning. Edinburgh, equally with the lower and upper reaches of the Tay has the right and the desire to keep perpetually in mind the fame of the regiment and the names of those who, in the last great Imperial war, were faithful unto death.

The Scotsman Tuesday 28/6/1910.

BLACK WATCH MEMORIAL

The Mound, Edinburgh

Dedicated to the Right Honourable W. S. Brown, Lord Provost of the City of Edinburgh.

The Statue to the 42nd on the Mound

This grand Statue is erected
To the Royal Forty-Two,
Who fought in all Napoleon’s wars
Right on to Waterloo.

They bore their part in Egypt,
Where brave Abercromby fell;
And at Mandora’s stubborn fight
They did their duty well.

At Vittoria and Corunna,
And at Badajos as well;
But the fiercest fight was Quatre Bras,
Where nigh five hundred fell.

In Flanders – where they saved the guns
And covered the retreat –
They won the Blood-Red Heckle,
For it was a daring feat.

And when they climbed up Alma’s heights
They gave a ringing cheer,
But when they saw the Kilted Lads
The Russians ran with fear.

When at the Indian Mutiny
They marched by day and night,
To save the wives and children
It served them for the fight.

At Coomassa and at El-Teb
Tamaai and Tel-el-Kebir
Macneil first climbed the breast work,
They lost the Major there.

And at dreadful Magersfontein
Where so many fell that day,
McLelland shouted “Look to God,”
And Wauchope led the way.

And when the friends will see this stone,
They’ll see some name they know,
And gently sigh and shed a tear
For friends of long ago.

Our King has done his very best
To foster loves and peace;
We pray we’ll live to see the day
When war and strife shall cease.

W. L. HUNTER

Subscribed by _ _

OFFICERS, NON-COM. OFFICERS, MEN, and FRIENDS of the 42nd, in HONOUR of the MEN WHO FELL IN AFRICA.

Wm. R DUFF & CO., PRINTERS, LEITH.

TBS
3/10/2003
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Adam Brown
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Murray

Yesterday's Edinburgh Evening News had a very good photograph of a former Black Watch officer standing on the scaffolding right beside the head of this Statue.

Do you have any contacts who could get some close up photographs of the statue whilst the scaffolding is up?

Regards

Adam
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Murray



Joined: 21 Jan 2008
Posts: 66

PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Officer is Major R C B Ritchie MBE. He is the President of the Edinburgh, Lothians and Borders Black Watch Association.

It was a lovely lass from Finland called Lisa that showed RCB around. If you ask her then I'm sure she would take some close ups for you.

The Edinburgh Council man in charge of memorials also visit on a regular basis.

If you get to go up then hard hats and high visibility vests are the order of the day

The climbing party being briefed by Lisa. The man in the brown jumper is David somebody who is project manager.




RCB going up followed by the Evening News photographer




The Memorial at the present time.

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Malcolm



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Location: Edinburgh

PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 8:36 pm    Post subject: F G Tait Reply with quote

On this Memorial is Frederick Guthrie Tait, son of Professor Tait of Edinburgh University who used to drive golf balls into a big slab of clay in the basement of Drummond Street labs when his father was writing a paper on GOLF. When I worked at Edinburgh in Physics I saw several artifacts from these experiments.

Frederick Guthrie Tait (January 11, 1870 - February 7, 1900) was a Scottish soldier and amateur golfer.

Born in Edinburgh, the third son of eminent physicist and fanatical amateur golfer Peter Guthrie Tait, Frederick was educated at the Edinburgh Academy and Sedbergh School. He entered the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst at the second attempt and is credited with introducing golf there. Tait joined the 2nd battalion, the Leinster regiment (109th foot) and then the 2nd battalion, the Black Watch.

Tait was an extremely powerful and long hitter of the ball. At The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews on January 11, 1893, he hit the ball 250 yards, the ball then rolling on frozen ground and coming to rest 341 yards from the tee, thereby refuting his father's calculation that 190 yards was the maximum possible flight. Tait won the The Amateur Championship twice (1896 and 1898), finished third in The Open Championship twice (1896 and 1897) and was leading amateur in the same competition on six occasions.

Tait was killed in action at Koodoosberg during the Second Boer War.

Aye
Malcolm
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Murray



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PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2008 4:36 pm    Post subject: Rededication Reply with quote

Just to update you all. It is planned to hold a rededication parade on Sunday 30th March at 2pm.

Hopefully, past and present members of the Black Watch will form up and march down to the memorial. There will be a rededication service and official handover to Edinburgh City Council.

Might see you there.
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Murray



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The rededication of the memorial took place on the 30 March. It was a cold, wet and windy day, however things went well.

The Memorial is looking really good as you can see below.









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David McNay
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 11:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you have a shot of the front panel? I'm curious to see if they've replaced the bayonets after over 100 years.
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