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KIRRIEMUIR, V.C.'s

 
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2008 1:48 pm    Post subject: KIRRIEMUIR, V.C.'s Reply with quote

This memorial is a slab set into the walkway at Cumberland Close, Kirriemuir;

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Adam Brown
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2008 10:38 pm    Post subject: VictoriaCross Reply with quote

From wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Anthony_Lyell,_2nd_Baron_Lyell

Charles Antony Lyell, 2nd Baron Lyell VC (1913–27 April 1943) was a Scottish recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

He was 29 years old, and a temporary captain in the 1st Battalion, Scots Guards, British Army during the Second World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

He succeeded his grandfather as Baron Lyell in 1926. Between 1936 to his death, Lord Lyell was a member of Boodle's club in St James's, London.

During the period 22 April/27 April 1943 near Dj Bou Arada, Tunisia, Captain Lord Lyell's outstanding leadership and gallantry enabled his company to take its objective. On 27 April accompanied by a sergeant, a lance-corporal and two guardsmen, he led an attack on an enemy post consisting of an 88mm. gun and a heavy machine-gun in two separate pits. He destroyed the crew of the machine-gun with a hand grenade and then, three of the party having become casualties, and with the lance-corporal to give covering fire he leapt into the second pit, killing several of the crew before being overwhelmed and killed. Both the guns had been silenced.

From the CWGC

http://www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=2196663

LYELL, CHARLES ANTONY
Rank: Captain
Regiment/Service: Scots Guards
Unit Text: 1st Bn.
Age: 29
Date of Death: 27/04/1943
Service No: 57781
Awards: V C
Additional information:
2nd Baron of Kinnordy. Son of the Hon. C. H. Lyell, M.P., and of the Hon. Mrs. Lyell (nee Watney); husband of Lady Lyell (nee Trafford), of Kinnordy, Kirriemuir, Angus. B.Sc. (Oxon.): Christ Church. County Councillor for Angus.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: V. H. 5.
Cemetery: MASSICAULT WAR CEMETERY

Citation: The citation in the London Gazette of 12th August, 1943, gives the following details;
From 22nd April, 1943, Captain the Lord Lyell commanded his company with great courage, ability and cheerfulness. He led it down a slope under heavy mortar fire to repel a German counter-attack on 22nd April, and led it again under heavy fire on 23rd April in order to capture and consolidate a high point, which was held through a very arduous period of shelling, heat and shortage of water. In the evening of 27th April, Lord Lyell's company, while taking part in an attack, was held up by fire from a position which consisted of an 88-millimetre gun and a heavy machine-gun in separate pits. Lord Lyell led four men to attack this position; he was far in front of the others, and destroyed the machine-gun pit with a hand-grenade. Then, aided by covering fire from the only uninjured man of his party, he attacked the 88-millimetre gun pit before its crew could fire more than one shot. He killed a number of them before being overwhelmed and killed himself. The few survivors withdrew and his company was able to advance and take its objective. Lord Lyell's outstanding leadership, gallantry and self-sacrifice enabled his company to carry out its task, which had an important bearing on the success of the battalion and of the brigade.

Captain Lord Lyell VC is also commemorated on the Barony Church war memorial and Kirriemuir War Memorial


Last edited by Adam Brown on Mon Mar 02, 2009 7:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Adam Brown
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2008 10:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Richard Henry Burton VC
(January 29, 1923 – 11 July 1993) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

Burton was 21 years old and a private in the 1st Battalion, The Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment, British Army, during the Second World War when the following deed took place. It was for this that he was awarded the Victoria Cross.

"On 8 October 1944 at Monte Ceco, Italy, when an assault was held up, Private Burton rushed forward from his platoon and engaged a Spandau position with his tommy gun, killing three of the crew. Later, again showing complete disregard for his own safety he disposed of the crews of two machine-guns and thanks to his outstanding courage the company was able to consolidate the position. Afterwards, in spite of the fact that most of his comrades were either dead or wounded, he repelled two counter-attacks, directing such accurate fire that the enemy retired."

Further information
Burton moved to Scotland in later life but was born in Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire. He later achieved the rank of corporal.
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Adam Brown
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2008 10:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Melvin

Charles Melvin VC
(2 May 1885 - 17 July 1941) was a Scottish recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

Charles Melvin 1885—1941
Nickname: Chay Melvin
Place of birth: Craig, Angus, Scotland
Place of death: Kirriemuir, Angus, Scotland
Years of service: 4 April 1907 - 15 April 1919 (12 years & 12 days)
Rank: Private
Unit: 2nd Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)
Awards: Victoria Cross
Relations: Brother of Private James Melvin (Black Watch), and Private David Melvin (Scottish Horse).

Private Melvin's citation for the award of the Victoria Cross, as published in the Supplement to the London Gazette (dated 26 November 1917), states:

"No. 871 Pte. Charles Melvin, R. Highrs. (Kirriemuir) - For most conspicuous bravery, coolness and resource in action. Pte. Melvin's company had advanced to within fifty yards of the front-line trench of a redoubt, where, owing to the intensity of the enemy's fire, the men were obliged to lie down and wait for reinforcements. Pte. Melvin, however, rushed on by himself, over ground swept from end to end by rifle and machine-gun fire. On reaching the enemy trench, he halted and fired two or three shots into it, killing one or two enemy, but as the others in the trench continued to fire at him, he jumped into it, and attacked them with his bayonet in his hand, as, owing to his rifle being damaged, it was not “fixed." On being attacked in this resolute manner most of the enemy fled to their second line, but not before Pte. Melvin had killed two more and succeeded in disarming eight unwounded and one wounded. Pte. Melvin bound up the wounds of the wounded man, and then driving his eight unwounded prisoners before him, and supporting the wounded one, he hustled them out of the trench, marched them in and delivered them over to an officer. He then provided himself with a load of ammunition and returned to the firing line where he reported himself to his platoon sergeant. All this was done, not only under intense rifle and machine-gun fire, but the whole way back Pte. Melvin and his party were exposed to a very heavy artillery barrage fire. Throughout the day Pte. Melvin greatly inspired those near him with confidence and courage."

His Victoria Cross is displayed at the Black Watch Museum in Perth
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FortyTwa



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PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Charles Melvin is buried in the cemetery on Kirrie Hill, with his VC engraved headstone facing the town's war memorial.

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FortyTwa



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PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lord Charles Lyell VC and Charles Melvin VC are both commemorated by streets named after them in a new housing estate in Kirriemuir.

They are joined, not by Richard Burton VC as might be expected, but by another local legend - the late AC/DC singer/songwriter Bon Scott!

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DelBoy



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PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 1:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Melvin was presented with his medal on the 11th of December 1919 at Buckingham Palace by the King.

Derek.
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FortyTwa



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PostPosted: Sat Apr 13, 2013 12:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Family grave of Richard Burton VC, also in Kirriemuir Cemetery

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kinnethmont



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PostPosted: Sat Apr 13, 2013 7:14 pm    Post subject: KIRRIEMUIR, V.C.'s Reply with quote

Whilst not seeking to detract in any way from the Late Richard Henry Burton's actions in Italy and the award to him of the V.C., I do wonder why his name is upon the flag in the initial post if he only moved to Kirriemuir in later life. I assume the other two did reside locally when their V.C. deed was carried out.
Was this, perhaps, done in connection with the Millenium?
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FortyTwa



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PostPosted: Sun Apr 14, 2013 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While not seeking to detract in any way from your view, Jim, I think the following brief extract from the obituary carried in The Independent perhaps gives some validity to Dick Burton's inclusion as one of Kirrie's three VCs.

"He married the girl he had met before going to war, a Scot called Dorothy Robertson, in 1945. They went to live in Kirriemuir, Angus, there bringing up three boys and a girl. The Leicestershire lad became a convert Scot, even to the accent."

Ever modest regarding his actions and recognition, he and his family are held in as high regard in his adopted home town as he is in Melton Mowbray.

What is beyond doubt is that, by choice, he lived in Kirrie for most of his life.

While similarly not seeking to detract from the appropriateness or otherwise of his inclusion on the memorial flagstone in Cumberland Close, it might equally be observed that the Hon Charles Lyell VC was born in Chelsea and was brought up and educated furth of Scotland before moving his wife to the neglected family seat on the outskirts of Kirrie in 1940, just three years before the action which earned him his posthumous decoration.
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kinnethmont



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PostPosted: Sun Apr 14, 2013 1:43 pm    Post subject: KIRRIEMUIR, V.C.'s Reply with quote

Quote:
Burton moved to Scotland in later life

The detail " in later life" suggested to me he moved / was linked to Kirriemuir many years after the V.C. action, possibly in retirement.

Thanks for the explanation regards Lyell. Clearly he was residing locally at the time of his V.C. action.
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If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

www.kinnethmont.co.uk
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