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PITLOCHRY HIGH SCHOOL WW1

 
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2007 12:18 pm    Post subject: PITLOCHRY HIGH SCHOOL WW1 Reply with quote









Last edited by dhubthaigh on Fri Nov 30, 2007 2:08 pm; edited 1 time in total
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2007 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PERTHSHIRE ADVERTISER: 26.01.1921

PITLOCHRY SCHOOL MEMORIAL

UNVEILED BY DUCHESS OF ATHOLL
IMPRESSIVE CEREMONY


On Thursday afternoon a neat brass memorial set in marble in memory of 58 former pupils who made the supreme sacrifice in the Great War was unveiled by the Duchess of Atholl in Pitlochry H.G. School in presence of parents and relatives of the men who had fallen, and a large representation of the local branch of the Sailors and Soldiers Federation.
At the outset, Mr William MacGowan, M.A., schoolmaster, said he was exceedingly sorry a general invitation to the public to be present was impossible on account of their being cramped for room. He was glad to see such a fine turnout of ex-service men. The 2nd Paraphrase having been sung, prayer was offered by the Rev. D. M. Donald, B.D., parish minister.
Mr MacGowan then said that of the many meetings which had been held in the school since it was opened nearly 23 years ago, that one took its place as the most important. That day the school made history. In former meetings the note had been one of joy and gladness. But that day was one of sadness, mingled with pride, because they were met to pay the last token of homage, their last tribute of love, to the memory of 58 former pupils who made the supreme sacrifice in the Great war, fighting in the cause of truth and righteousness giving up their lives in order that we may have an opportunity of living ours in peace and safety.
Little did those boys think when they were at school equipping themselves for the battle of life that they would be called upon so soon to take part in one of the most important struggles in the history of our country or in that of the world. But when the call came hundreds of their own pupils answered the call of King and country - not heeding very much for themselves. Leaving all behind them - everything that was nearest and dearest - holding life itself not dear if only they could serve their country in the hour of need. During the years of war the school did its best to keep in touch with the boys, and it must be a very pleasant memory to the boys and girls who lived during those years to think of the share they took in sending out comforts to the men of the various services, and which he knew had been very highly appreciated.
When the war was finished, they rejoiced with those who came back safe and sound, they sympathised with those who had been shattered and maimed; and now they honoured those who would never return. The memorial had been founded to perpetuate the names of those who had fallen, so that their names and the memory of their brave deeds and sacrifice would be an inspiration, not only to the present but to future generations of boys and girls who would attend the school. Thanks to the generous support of the public a concert organised by the teachers enabled the necessary sum to be raised for the memorial, and they felt very highly honoured indeed in having the Duchess of Atholl present to unveil it.
The Duchess of Atholl said she appreciated very much the invitation to take part in what Mr MacGowan had rightly described as one of the most historic meetings in the school. She wished just to suggest two thoughts in considering the memorial they were dedicating to the memory of the brave men who were former pupils of the school, and who had made the great sacrifice for their country. The first was that in spite of the sorrow and the pain associated with such an occasion, there should be room in their hearts for thankfulness. Try to be thankful that their dear ones who took their share in what they all regarded as the greatest moment in the history of our country, when having striven for peace, and to a great extent unprepared for war she stood up for honour, for her plighted word, for justice, for liberty, and not her own liberty only, but for the liberty of the whole world against the greatest military power the world had ever seen. They were proud to have been citizens of the country when on that terribly great day of 4th August 1914; she dared all for the cause she knew to be right. They were especially thankful for the share their young men took in the days that followed, because on them fell the chief brunt of all that had been done. They never could forget the splendid response to the call which was made by them, nor in the years that followed. Their cheerful endurance through fatigue, of suffering, nor their undoubted heroism on the battlefield and in the trenches.
The way in which our young men had borne themselves during those terrible years had given a new pride in our race, and a new realisation of how essential our country is to the progress and welfare and the liberty of the whole world. They knew that it was mainly owing to the efforts made by Britain 100 years ago that Europe was saved from the great tyranny of Napoleon. The men of today had shown that they could worthily uphold that great tradition and the civilised world, she was quite confident, is recognising that it is largely due to the part played by Great Britain and her overseas dominions that the modern world has been freed from a menace even greater than that of Napoleon. So thankfulness be in their hearts that their loved ones took their share in the stupendous but necessary conflict.
Their lot was to all resolve to try to make ourselves worthy to follow in the footsteps of those whose names were recorded. They came forward fighting fore their country in the hour of need, prepared to sacrifice everything without thought of self.
The boys and girls present might not be called upon to fight for their country, but they should try to be worthy of the record of those who had gone before them. They should try to grow up, thinking of not only what they wanted for themselves, but of what would make the world a little happier and a little better for other people as well.
These men not only put their country first and themselves second, but they also served the great causes for which our country fought - the great cause of liberty and humanity, and perhaps first and foremost of all, the cause of honour and sacredness of a promise. Great Britain gave her word to Belgium, and because our statesmen regarded that above all as sacred, and which must be kept at all costs, it was mainly because of that that our country entered into the war. If ever they found a promise hard to keep - and promises are easily made sometimes and difficult to keep - or if perhaps they were afraid to stand up for what they know to be right, let them remember that these men fought and died that Britain’s promise might be kept, and that a smaller and weaker nation might be protected. Therefore, concluded the Duchess, let us try to keep their example ever before us; let us promise for ourselves that we will strive to be worthy citizens of our great empire.

Land of our birth! We pledge to thee,
Our love and toil in the years to be,
When we are grown and take our place,
As men and women in our race,
Land of our birth! Our stake and pride,
For thy dear sake our brothers died,
Oh, Motherland! We pledge to thee,
Head, Heart and Hand in the years to be.

(Applause)

Mr MacGowan then read over the inscription and the names on the memorial as under: “In proud and loving memory of the following former pupils, who made the supreme sacrifice during the Great War:-

PTE. ALEX BLACK, BLACK WATCH; PTE. JOHN BUTCHART, BLACK WATCH; PTE. DONALD CAMERON, BLACK WATCH; PTE. ALASTAIR CAMPBELL, BLACK WATCH; CPL. ALASTAIR CAMPBELL, BLACK WATCH; LIEUT. DONALD CAMPBELL, R.A.M.C.; PTE. DUNCAN CAMPBELL, A. & S. HIGHRS.; PTE. HOPE CAMPBELL, BLACK WATCH; LCE-CORPL. JAMES CRERAR, BLACK WATCH; PTE. WILLIAM DALGETY, BLACK WATCH; PTE. PETER DEWAR, ROYAL SCOTS; LIEUT. NORMAN DIXON, BLACK WATCH; LIEUT. IAN S. DONALD, SCOTTISH RIFLES; PTE. WILLIAM FRASER, SCOTTISH HORSE; LCE-CORPL. ROBERT GEARY, BLACK WATCH; PTE. JOHN GEDDES, CANADIANS; GUNNER WILLIAM GIBB, R.G.A.; PTE ROBERT HENDERSON, ROYAL SCOTS; SERGT. FRANK HENRY, M.M., CANADIANS; PTE. DAVID HOVELL, BLACK WATCH; PTE. ALEX. JAMIESON, BLACK WATCH; CAPT. GEORGE KELMAN, CANADIANS; PTE. ALEX. KENNEDY, CANADIANS; PTE. JACK LAMONT, IRISH RIFLES; PTE. JOHN LEIGHTON, H.L.I.; PTE. WILLIAM LOW, ROYAL SCOTS; SISTER M. MCBETH, CANTERBURY HOSPITAL; PTE. DOUGLAS M’DIARMID, SEAFORTHS; PTE. ANDREW M’DONALD, BLACK WATCH; PTE. DUNCAN M’DONALD, BORDER REGT.; GUNNER JAMES H. M’DONALD, R.G.A.; PTE. NORMAN M’DONALD, BLACK WATCH; PTE. WILLIE M’DONALD, CANADIANS; PTE. JAMES M’GILLIVRAY, BLACK WATCH; PTE. ANGUS M’GLASHAN, BLACK WATCH; LIEUT IAN M’GREGOR, NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS; PTE. JAMES M’INTOSH, BLACK WATCH; PTE. ALASTAIR M’KINNON, BLACK WATCH; PTE. JOHN M’LAREN, BLACK WATCH; PTE. HAMISH MANDERSTON, CAMERON HIGHRS.; PTE. PAT MUDIE, CANADIANS; PTE. DAVID PARRY, CANADIANS; PTE. HUGH PATERSON, BLACK WATCH; PTE. JOSEPH ROBB, ROYAL SCOTS; TROOPER CHARLES ROBERTSON, INNISKILLING DRAGOONS; PTE. DAVID ROBERTSON, SCOTS GUARDS; CPL. FRANK ROBERTSON, ROYAL SCOTS; PTE. JOHN ROBERTSON, H.L.I.; PTE WILLIAM ANGUS ROBERTSON, R.A.M.C.; PTE. ALASTAIR SCOTT, BLACK WATCH; PTE. ALEX. SCOTT, H.L.I.; PTE. WILLIAM SCOTT, BLACK WATCH; CPL. GEORGE M. SCOUGAL, M.M., ROYAL SCOTS; PTE. JAMES STEWART, CANADIANS; PTE. JOHN STEWART, BLACK WATCH; PTE. JOHN VEITCH, LONDON SCOTTISH; SERGT. PETER WALLACE, BLACK WATCH; PTE. JAMES WALLACE, BLACK WATCH.

‘The Flowers of the Forest’ having been sung by the H.G. Girls’ Choir, Her Grace, attended by the Federation representatives, proceeded to unveil the memorial, which had been covered by the Union Jack, and surmounted by a wreath of laurels, while below another Union jack was draped. A lament was played by Pipe Major Pirnie, while the ‘Last Post’ was impressively sounded by Bugler W. Robertson.
The Duchess was accorded a vote of thanks for her presence, on the call of Dr Beatty, Chairman of the School Management Committee, who expressed indebtedness to Her Grace, who had by her presence added to the sacredness of the occasion.
Those proceedings concluded with the singing of the National Anthem.
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dhubthaigh
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Joined: 19 Dec 2006
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2007 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The plaque is located inside the new Pitlochry High. Where the old building was, or if it still exists, I don't know.
You will see the P.A. states that the plaque is in a marble frame - but not now. Apparently there was a fire at the school in 1973 and the memorial was damaged. The word was that it had been partially restored so I wasn't sure what I was going to see when I got there.
Again sorry for the overall quality of the pics, usual problems.
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dhubthaigh
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Joined: 19 Dec 2006
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Location: Blairgowrie, Perthshire

PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2007 12:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sister M. McBeth (sic), Canterbury Hospital is also on the Scottish Nurses Memorial in St. Giles Cathedral, Edinburgh;

http://warmemscot.s4.bizhat.com/viewtopic.php?t=754&highlight=nurses
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Tonym



Joined: 18 Jan 2007
Posts: 226
Location: East Sussex

PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just found the following on CWGC -

Name: MACBETH, MARGARET ANN
Initials: M A
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Staff Nurse
Regiment/Service: Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service
Age: 28
Date of Death: 30/10/1918
Service No: 2/Res/M/1009
Additional information: Daughter of Mrs. Helen Macbeth, of Lower Viewbank, Pitlochry.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: G. 126.
Cemetery: PITLOCHRY NEW CEMETERY

The details indicate that this is obviously the same person but, being a non-Scot I would be interested to know how a Scot reacts to the incorrect spelling of their name i.e. 'Mac' for 'Mc'. Does the spelling have any Clan connections or is it acceptable either way?
Forgive my ignorance but since joining the two forums my knowledge of Scotland has improved immensely.

Tony
_________________
Pte. W. BROWN, Middlesex Regiment, K.I.A Battle of The Somme.
Sgt. J. V. MURPHY, The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, D.O.W Monte Cassino, Italy.
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spoons



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Location: St John's Town of Dalry

PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also being a non-scot (but with many years experience with Scottish payrolls etc Rolling Eyes ) I can tell you that confusion between Mc and Mac is fairly common, even amongst Scots. I understand that historically (i.e. centuries ago) Mac was the correct form and Mc is a latter 'error'. However as Mc is nowadays more common (IMHO), then better not say that too loudly. Wink

\Paul
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stuartn



Joined: 13 Dec 2016
Posts: 2343

PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2019 7:28 am    Post subject: WMR (ex UKNIWM) report Reply with quote

WMR 82306
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