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KINCLAVEN

 
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2006 12:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unveiled November 1920 (no further details - yet).

Listed Category B by Historic Scotland 5th October 1971. Another drafted by Reginald Fairlie.


Last edited by dhubthaigh on Mon Jun 04, 2007 1:31 pm; edited 1 time in total
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dhubthaigh
Our first ever 1000-poster


Joined: 19 Dec 2006
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Location: Blairgowrie, Perthshire

PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2006 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Re. the Beech Hedges.
Apparently one tree was planted in for each man that left the area to fight at Culloden and never returned.

They were allowed to grow unchecked and now stand as the highest hedge in the world - and War Memorial (natural) ?
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BLAIRGOWRIE ADVERTISER: 07.08.1920

KINCLAVEN WAR MEMORIAL
OPENING AND DEDICATION


With fitting ceremonial the Kinclaven War Memorial, which takes the shape of an arched gateway or porch at the entrance to the churchyard, was opened and dedicated on Sunday afternoon.
An ample crowd of not less than 400 people gathered for the occasion, and, favoured by good weather, the ceremony passed with great acceptance to all concerned.
The service began beside the memorial with the well-known song of deliverance, Psalm 124 - ‘Now Israel may say’. Thereafter, on behalf of the Committee who had carried out the work, the parish minister, Rev. H. K. Reekie, having first invoked the divine blessing, made a brief statement. They had been singularly fortunate, he thought, in all respects with regard to the memorial - fortunate in their architect, Mr Fairlie, Edinburgh; fortunate in the craftsmen employed to carry out the work, and fortunate above all in the m monument they had raised, which now asked and, he trusted, would receive, their approval that day. It was, he ventured to think, a right worthy memorial, which would continue to tell its tale to the generations to come and would show their sense of the loss they had sustained and of the sacrifice made on their behalf by their fallen sons and brothers, who were truly a band which any parish might be proud. They offered themselves willingly, and they died bravely, proud, no doubt, to be part of that mighty throng who gave their lives that the British race might continue to be free. They were fortunate again, be said, in having with them that day his Grace the Dune of Atholl, who had kindly consented to open the gateway. His Grace was not only a very distinguished nobleman; he was also a very brave soldier, and, what gave zest to both these things, as a heritor in the parish he was one of themselves. Mr Reekie said he had the pleasure in handing His grace a key, and asking him to open the gate.
This having been done, the inscription on the panels of the monument was then read. It read as follows:-

In proud and loving memory of the men of this parish who gave their lives for right, freedom, and honour.

1914
MAJOR LORD CHARLES MERECER NAIRNE, M.V.O., 1ST ROYAL DRAGOONS
LIEUT. JOHN CHARLES MURRAY, 2ND COLDSTREAM GUARDS

1915
PTE. WALTER KNOX, BLACK WATCH
PTE. JOHN M’TAVISH, BLACK WATCH
PTE. THOMAS C. WHITE, K.O.S.B.

1916
PTE. WM. C. JAMIESON, ROYAL SCOTS

1917
CPL. DAVID MACKAY, H.L.I.
PTE. BLYTHE MILLAR, A.S.C.
PTE. FRASER M’INTOSH, BLACK WATCH

1918
REV. CHARLES ROBERTSON, M.A., M.C., C.F., 12TH A. AND S. HRS.
PTE. GEORGE HOGG, BLACK WATCH
PTE. STEWART M’ANDREW
PTE. JAMES SOCTT, BLACK WATCH
PTE. DAVID YOUNG, SEAFORTH HRS.


Faithful unto death.

His Grace then, in a very appropriate speech, addressed the gathering. He was glad, he said, to take part in so interesting a ceremony. It was fitting that as Lord Lieutenant of the county, as representative of His majesty, whose soldiers had given their lives for the cause, he should be willing to come there and assist on such an occasion. Some people looked at these war memorials as remembrances of a great and hateful war, through which they had only just succeeded in emerging successfully, while others looked upon them as tombstones to the dead. He was afraid he could accept neither view, and that such was their own thought, he believed, was shown by the fact they had raised neither a cairn nor a cross, but very happily a sort of porch at the entrance to the grounds of the parish Church, the centre of the community. He looked upon it, as they did, as a memorial to that great spirit of sacrifice, of loyalty, and fortitude shown by the people of this country in the hour of trial, when it was absolutely necessary to sink all the smaller affairs of life and to concentrate on the greater ones, when the life and the comfort of the individual as compared to the honour and defence of our native land were as naught. On the memorials we place the names of those from whom all was asked and who gave all so gladly; and we inscribe their names, he continued, because in their heroic lead across the skyline, whence no man returns, was concentrated the very essence of that spirit which he had mentioned. He had pleasure in declaring the gateway to be open as a perpetual memorial to the men who so nobly gave their lives for freedom, country, and honour.
At this stage the monument was dedicated by Rev. W. Inglis, of Kinclaven U.F. Church, who also engaged in prayer.
The people then took themselves to the church, where the service was continued, and an eloquent and inspiring sermon was preached by Professor main, of St. Andrew’s University, a distinguished war chaplain. Taking as his text Jeremiah LI, 50, he said Jeremiah was the prophet of the sorrowful message, yet from whom there were constantly glimpses of the better day, of a new covenant, of a nobler temple. The text spoke of deliverance from the sword and of giving God thanks for such deliverance. That was a message which they could understand, and which they could apply to themselves. Thanksgiving for deliverance from war - grim-visaged war - today was opportune. Many had fallen by the sword in the struggle of those terrible years. All honour to them. Let people thank God and go forward.
It was meet that they should have in their parishes in Scotland those memorials of what had been done; meet that they should have their memorial in Kinclaven should have their memorial to the 14 brave hearts who were never to return to those they loved; and each time as they entered the churchyard they would be able to remember them and the sacrifice they made.. At the same time let them not forget to give God that there were those so worthy. In the text they got their marching orders. Stand not still, it said to them; be up and doing. There was a tendency for the present to seek an easy time. Some ease and comfort after the strain of war was natural, and to bask in the sunshine of national achievement was intelligible, for Britain’s part in the war was a great one. He doubted if our Allies yet understood how great it was. But there was a danger of complacent egotism gripping them, and that was a mark of decadence and not of progress. Forwards always - that, he was sure, would be the message of their fallen comrades if they could speak today. Carry on. Think not so much of rights and privileges and rewards; think rather of duties and services to be rendered. Their best thank offering, their best memorial, would be that of dedicated, practical lives.
The service included an anthem by the unite choirs of the two churches in the parish - ‘Sing unto the Lord’. It was a somewhat ambitious effort, but proved to be well within the range of the singers, who received high praise for their rendering of it.
The Benediction having been pronounced, the National Anthem was sung, and a great commemoration, memorable for its simple impressiveness, was brought to a close.
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Kenneth Morrison



Joined: 29 Sep 2008
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Location: Rockcliffe Dalbeattie

PostPosted: Sun Aug 25, 2019 3:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1915
PTE. WALTER KNOX, BLACK WATCH
.

Named on the Jedburgh War Memorial in Roxburghshire as:

KNOX, WR. L.C. BL. WATCH.
Walter Knox – age 28 – Lance Corporal (1836) 1/6th (Perthshire) Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)
Walter had served his apprenticeship at Hartrigge, Jedburgh and was a gardener to Sir Stuart Coats at Stanley in Perthshire when he enlisted in September 1914. He landed with his battalion at Boulogne in May 1915 but he was killed less than two months later.
Born 1887 in Jedburgh. Son of the late Robert Knox, saddler, of Jedburgh (died 1911) and of Jessie (Turnbull) Knox of Galashiels, Selkirkshire.
Missing in Action on 24 June 1915 and named on the Le Touret Memorial, France.

Note:SDGW has his birthplace as Stanley, Perthshire and the Jedburgh Gazette of 9/7/1915 reported that
"LANCE -CORP WALTER KNOX REPORTED KILLED A letter received by Mr John Lamb, Liberal Club, Jedburgh, contained the information that Lance Corporal Walter Knox, B. Coy. 1/6th Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), had been reported killed. The intimation came from the Company-Sergeant, who staled that Knox got a bullet through the neck, and strange to say, the lad who enlisted along with Knox at Perth in September last was killed by the same bullet."

I guess this second man was Private 1835 MACTAVISH, J. 1/6th Bn.
Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)
Died 24/06/1915
PONT-DU-HEM MILITARY CEMETERY, LA GORGUE, Nord, France.
_________________
Ken
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2019 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ken,

You are spot on John Mactavish/McTavish was Knox's pal and the 'second man'.

THE PEOPLE'S JOURNAL: 03.07.1915
THREE STANLEY SOLDIERS KILLED


Three Stanley soldiers - Andrew M'Pherson, WALTER KNOX, and JOHN M'TAVISH, of the 6th Black Watch, have fallen in action. This information came yesterday from Private Wm. Stewart, B Company, 6th Black Watch, in a letter to his mother, Mrs William Stewart, Store Street, Stanley.

In his letter, dated France, Sunday, 27th June, Private Stewart says:- "We have been in the trenches again, and I am sorry to say that Andrew M'Pherson, WALTER KNOX and JOHN M'TAVISH have been killed. We have a lot more killed and wounded. It is a great pity about WALTER KNOX and JOHN M'TAVISH. They left Ballathie together, came over here together, and they have both died together. The chaps at home don't realise what is going on out here. They should be forced to enlist; that is all that is in it. We had a terrible day of rain on Friday, but it has cleared up again, but things are in a terrible mess of mud".

Private M'Pherson, who was 20 years of age, was a Territorial previous to the outbreak of war, and was a son of Mr Wm. M'Pherson, Stanley Coffee-House. Privates KNOX and M'TAVISH were gardeners with Mr Stuart Coats, Bart., Ballathie, Stanley.


John MacTavish/McTavish is also commemorated on Cromarty War Memorial alongside his brother Hugh.

The letter writer, William Stewart, was killed on 30th July, 1916 when the 6th Black Watch went 'over the top' for the first time attacking the German positions at High Wood.
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