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RANNOCH
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 6:55 pm    Post subject: RANNOCH Reply with quote

Map Information Location:
Grid ref: NN659578
Web Address: www.multimap.com/map/browse.cgi?lat=56.6928&lon=-4.1902&scale=25000&icon=x

The memorial is located on the east bank of Loch Rannoch and offers stunning views from its situation;




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Tonym



Joined: 18 Jan 2007
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Location: East Sussex

PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I love the design of an ancient Scottish Cairn but that's a Sassenach's opinion

Tony
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Sgt. J. V. MURPHY, The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, D.O.W Monte Cassino, Italy.
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DerekR
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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tonym wrote:
I love the design of an ancient Scottish Cairn but that's a Sassenach's opinion
Tony

Tony,
I love the design as well - that's a Scots opinion!

I guess the design is based on the old Scottish custom of warriors taking a single stone to battle and each dropping the stone in a pile.
After the battle the survivors remove their stone and the pile that is left signify the casualties incurred.
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Adam Brown
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Location: Edinburgh (From Sutherland)

PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm glad someone has got this memorial on the forum. I stayed in Kinloch Rannoch a few years ago and the memorial is a bit out of the village. I walked down the road it was on but I din't know it was there and I stopped just short of seeing the memorial. It's bugged me ever since so it's nice to see the memorial now.

Does the Gaelic inscription at the bottom of the Great War panel translate to 'Their name liveth for evermore'?

Adam
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2007 8:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Adam wrote:
Quote:
I'm glad someone has got this memorial on the forum.

Adam, it's a Perthshire Memorial - who else would have posted it! Wink

Adam wrote:
Quote:
Does the Gaelic inscription at the bottom of the Great War panel translate to 'Their name liveth for evermore'?


Some gaelic translations already posted. Seems to be the same as Fortingall;
http://warmemscot.s4.bizhat.com/viewtopic.php?t=1132&highlight=gaelic
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2007 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DerekR wrote:

I guess the design is based on the old Scottish custom of warriors taking a single stone to battle and each dropping the stone in a pile.
After the battle the survivors remove their stone and the pile that is left signify the casualties incurred.

Never knew that, fascinating.
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 26, 2007 7:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some interesting inclusions from the mmonument;

Name: COBBOLD, JOHN MURRAY
Initials: J M
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lieutenant Colonel
Regiment/Service: Scots Guards
Age: 47
Date of Death: 18/06/1944
Service No: 110300
Additional information: Son of John Dupuis Cobbold, D.L., and of Lady Evelyn Cobbold (nee Murray); husband of Lady Blanche Cobbold (nee Cavendish). of Glemham Hall, Suffolk. D.L., J.P., Sherriff of Suffolk.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 1.
Cemetery: GOLDERS GREEN CREMATORIUM

Name: WALLIS, DAVID WILLIAM
Initials: D W
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Major
Regiment/Service: Parachute Regiment, A.A.C.
Unit Text: 2nd Bn.
Age: 29
Date of Death: 18/09/1944
Service No: 93375
Additional information: Son of Frederick and Katherine Elizabeth Wallis, of Rannoch, Perthshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: 18. C. 10.
Cemetery: ARNHEM OOSTERBEEK WAR CEMETERY

Also listed on the Kilchrenan War Memorial, Argyll

Name: DE SALES LATERRIERE, FRANCIS JAMES RHODERICK
Initials: F J R
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment/Service: Royal Armoured Corps
Unit Text: Royal Scots Greys (2nd Dragoons)
Date of Death: 29/10/1944
Service No: 256521
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: V.A.5.
Cemetery: LIER BELGIAN MILITARY CEMETERY
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

COL. JOHN MURRAY (IVAN) COBBOLD JP (1897-1944)

SOLDIER, BREWER, SPORTSMAN and FOUNDER OF IPSWICH TOWN FC
The sixth John Cobbold, grandson of the Earl of Dunmore, must have vexed his parents for he was nicknamed ‘Ivan the terrible.’ It stuck and he was known as Ivan for the rest of his life. He joined the Scots Guards in 1915, was injured but not seriously in France and left the army at the end of the war. A keen sportsman, one of the best shots in the country, it was a pursuit he shared with King George VI. He joined the family brewing business and was present at the 200th anniversary celebrations on 30th July 1923 at Holywells succeeding to the chairmanship on his father’s death in 1929.

Following a chance meeting with Sir Samuel Hill-Wood, Chairman of Arsenal and a visit to Highbury ‘Capt.’ Ivan (as he then was) put up the money necessary for Ipswich Town Football Club to turn professional. The amateur club had been founded in 1878 by the boys of Ipswich School under the presidency of Thomas Clement Cobbold MP (1833-1883) his great uncle, with a distinctive Corinthian culture which survives to this day. WWII saw him back in uniform now with the rank of Colonel only to be tragically killed when a doodlebug hit the Guards Chapel during Sunday morning service on 18th June 1944. Ironically it was in that same chapel that he had married Lady Blanche Cavendish who had lived at Chatsworth House, daughter of Victor Cavendish, 9th Duke of Devonshire and sister-in-law of British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan. They had just celebrated their Silver Wedding.

ITS AMAZING WHAT GETS UNCOVERED - IMAGINE, THE FOUNDER OF IPSWICH TOWN FOOTBALL CLUB ON A WAR MEMORIAL AT RANNOCH!!!
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

COBBOLD'S connection to the area would have been through his mother - Lady Evelyn Murray. Her father Charles Adolphus Murray was the 7th Earl of Dunmore.
Lady Evelyn's brother, Alexander Murray, 8th Earl of Dunmore was a V.C. winner;

Alexander Edward Murray, 8th Earl of Dunmore, VC, DSO, MVO, (22 April 1872–29 January 1962) was a Scottish recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.
Details
He was 26 years old, a viscount, and a lieutenant in the 16th Lancers (The Queen's), British Army during the Tirah Campaign, India when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.
On 17 August 1897 at Nawa Kili, Upper Swat, India, Lieutenant Lord Fincastle with two other officers (Robert Bellew Adams and Hector Lachlan Stewart MacLean) and five men of the Guides, went under a heavy and close fire, to the rescue of a lieutenant of the Lancashire Fusiliers who was lying disabled by a bullet wound and surrounded by enemy swordsmen. Whilst the wounded officer was being brought under cover, he was unfortunately killed by a bullet. One of the officers of the rescue party was mortally wounded and four horses were shot.
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JOHN MURRAY COBBALD
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jamiemcginlay



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PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2008 5:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A photo of one of my collection of old postcards showing Craigvar and the Rannoch war memorial, undated. Its interesting how many memorials like this one seem to have stood clear on fairly open ground when first erected. I suppose this is at least in part due to de-forestation during WWI and the setting up of the Forestry Commission in later years.
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DerekR
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: ROBERTSON, DUNCAN
Initials: D
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Private
Regiment/Service: Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)
Unit Text: 9th Bn.
Age: 20
Date of Death: 26/04/1917
Service No: S/40418
Additional information: Son of Peter and Susan Robertson, of East Killiechonan, Rannoch Station, Perthshire.
Grave/Memorial Reference: I. C. 13.


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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2008 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the unveiling report for Stanley it states that it was the last memorial of its kind to be solemnised in Perthshire.

http://warmemscot.s4.bizhat.com/viewtopic.php?t=251&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0

However, I have found an index to Rannoch from the Perthshire Advertiser for a dedication in September, 1930 !. Must check that at some point.
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2008 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PERTHSHIRE ADVERTISER: 24.09.1930

RANNOCH WAR MEMORIAL

DUKE OF ATHOLL AND CELTIC SPIRIT


Although twelve years have elapsed since the termination of the Great War it is only now that the Rannoch area has seen the erection and dedication of a public memorial to the 27 men of the district who made the supreme sacrifice. This delay was not due to any lack of feeling on the part of the community, as the project was mooted at the time, but as the Duke of Atholl explained at the unveiling ceremony on Sunday, delay was occasioned by the uncertainty as to whether the site would be affected by work on the Grampian Electricity Scheme which, originally, the heightening of Loch Rannoch was contemplated.
The memorial takes the form of a conical pile of rough boulders and towers about 30 feet in height, from a bluff of heather clad moorland by the edge of the road about half a mile south-west of the village; behind the sugar-loaf peak of mighty Schiehallion. The names of the fallen heroes are inscribed on a tablet in the cairn which looks clear over the shining waters of Loch Rannoch and the hills of Glencoe in the west.
The unveiling ceremony attracted a gathering of close on a thousand people, many of whom had come a considerable distance to take part in the historic event.
Shortly before three o’clock the Kinloch Rannoch Pipe Band, under Pipe-Major M’Master, led a lengthy procession from the village to the memorial, occasional glimpses of sunshine breaking through dark clouds overhead in the peace of a perfect autumn afternoon being symbolic of the aftermath of the world war. At the memorial there were paraded the district ex-service men, brethren of the recently formed Masonic Lodge Schiehallion in front of the large concourse of general public.
Captain B. V. Wentworth of Dall, presided at the dedication service, which was in keeping with the simplicity of the memorial. The service opened with a prayer by the Rev. R. Walker, St. Luke’s Church, and the singing of the peculiarly appropriate 124th psalm, “I to the hill will lift mine eyes”, and portions from the Old and New Testaments were read by the rev. W. Scott of the Episcopal Church, and the Rev. W. Dunlop, Braes of Rannoch.
The prayer and dedication was given by the rev. A. Muirhead of Old Rannoch Church, after which Mrs Stewart of Bunrannoch, unveiled the memorial by withdrawing the Union Jack which had covered the names of the 27 enumerated on the tablet.
A “lament” was played by Pipe-Major M’Master, and a two minutes’ silence observed, rendered doubly impressive by the entire absence of any sound save the soft lapping of the waters of Loch Rannoch on the shingled shore only a short distance from the hushed scene.
In his address, the Duke of Atholl, Lord-Lieutenant of Perthshire, explained that the delay in the erection of the memorial had been due to the uncertainty of the Grampian Electrical Scheme. No situation, he proceeded, could have been more happily chosen, looking as it did up a great glen laved with the waters of Loch Rannoch, perhaps one of the most beautiful views in all Scotland - a view which every one of those names they commemorate must have seen and loved, and often dreamed of in the long weary days and nights across the seas.
“That the cairn should be composed of stones from the edge of the loch is one of those happy thoughts so Celtic in character and understanding, which form an indissoluble link between those who are here, and those who have passed over, for your thought in building it has been most of all for what they would have liked.
“We commemorate the names of the 27 men who came forward at the time of their country’s need, and who never came back to the land they loved, but even more than their names, this cairn will stand for many years commemorative of that spirit of sacrifice, duty, and honour which was given to practically every man and woman in this country at the supreme moment of national existence and national need.
“When you pass this monument, rather than the sense of sadness, you will feel one of pride that it was given to you to be of same kith and kin as those whose spirits surround it.
“Rannoch has never shown itself wanting in bravery and in service, and it is not surprising that the district which was the cradle of men like Gen. George Duncan Robertson of Struan, General Sir Duncan M’Gregor of Learan, and the MacDonalds of Dalchosnie should be the home of men of the type who served in the Great War

TRADITION OF SERVICE

“No spot in all the Highlands has breathed more concentrated bravery for generations past than this district of Rannoch, and it is for this generation and succeeding ones to maintain that great tradition of service on behalf of the cause they felt to be just, which was striking a characteristic of their forebears from time immemorial.
Do not let it be said that people of this generation have less sense of duty than those who went before them. It may or may not be given to us to make the great personal sacrifice they made, but we can all help in some small way to maintain those great qualities of the true Highlander - courage, loyalty, and endurance, and, may I say, “goodness” in the full sense of the word”.
Captain Wentworth in proposing a vote of thanks to the Duke of Atholl for his presence said he was specially fitted to be there that afternoon on account both of the military record of himself and his family.
The National Anthem was sung after which “The Last Post” was sounded by Bugler Andrew Watson of Black Watch, Perth, the clear notes peeling out impressively in the tense silence that prevailed. Many beautiful wreaths were reverently placed at the base of the memorial, these including tributes from the ex-service men, the Pipe Band, and relatives of the fallen.
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dhubthaigh
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PostPosted: Fri May 29, 2009 10:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Several men commemorated on this memorial eluded identification from the usual sources (CWGC, SDGW, SNWM etc.).
With the memorial having been erected as late as 1930, I explored the possibility that they had died after discharge in the post war years, more in particular from 1921-1930.
One of those listed is Private D. M. Stachan, Black Watch.
From the 1901 census I noted a Duncan Strachan, aged approx. 18 years, born at Rannoch, living at Leachdan Cott., Kinloch Rannoch, with his father, George, 3 sisters and one brother (William).
I searched for an MIC and believe this to be the correct one;

I then searched for a death entry and found this one which matched completely;
Duncan McGregor Strachan, died 11th October, 1929 at Rosebank, Stanley. Parents George Strachan and Euphemia McGregor. Cause:

Death was registered by his brother William.
Duncan was by then shown as a retired Inn-keeper. It will be interesting to note if there is an obituary in the local paper - and what it says.
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