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Wigtown
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spoons



Joined: 09 Jan 2007
Posts: 4991
Location: St John's Town of Dalry

PostPosted: Sun Feb 18, 2007 11:09 pm    Post subject: Wigtown Reply with quote

UKNIWM Ref: 13440

OS Map Ref: NX 4355 5547 (by GPS)

I always think that the cenotaph style looks a bit brutal compared with other memorials, but grey stone on a grey day probably doesn't add to the look.









Last edited by spoons on Mon May 27, 2013 4:29 pm; edited 1 time in total
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spoons



Joined: 09 Jan 2007
Posts: 4991
Location: St John's Town of Dalry

PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This memorial has been researched and details are on the Roll-of-Honour website at http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Wigtownshire/Wigtown.html

Louis McGuffie was a Victoria Cross winner and details are here
http://www.victoria-cross.co.uk/ and with the site owner's permission these details are copied below.

"McGUFFIE, Louis
Sergeant. 1st/5th Battalion. King's Own Scottish Borderers.
London Gazetted on 14th December, 1918.
Born on 15th March 1893 at Wigtown, Scotland.
Killed in action on 4th October, 1980 at Wyteschaete, Belgium.
Memorial on grave at Zandvoorde British Cemetery, Belgium.
Digest of Citation reads:
During an advance near Wytschaete, Belgium, on 28th September 1918, Sergeant McGuffie single-handed, searched many dug-outs and took several prisoners. In the operations that followed he dealt similarly with many more dug-outs, resulting in one officer and 25 other ranks surrendering to him. Whilst consolidating the first objective, he pursued and returned with several of the enemy who had slipped away. Some British troops were being led away as prisoners by the enemy and Private McGuffie was significant in their rescue. Later in the day, whilst in command of a platoon, he took many more prisoners"
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dhubthaigh
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Joined: 19 Dec 2006
Posts: 5070
Location: Blairgowrie, Perthshire

PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: McGUFFIE, LOUIS
Initials: L
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Serjeant
Regiment/Service: King's Own Scottish Borderers
Unit Text: 1st/5th Bn.
Age: 24
Date of Death: 04/10/1918
Service No: 240693
Awards: V C
Additional information: Son of Mrs. Catherine McGuffie, of 1, North Main St., Wigtown, Wigtownshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: I. D. 12.
Cemetery: ZANTVOORDE BRITISH CEMETERY
Citation: An extract from "The London Gazette," dated 13th Dec., 1918, records the following:-"For most conspicuous bravery and resourceful leadership under heavy fire near Wytschaete on 28th September, 1918. During the advance to Piccadilly Farm, he, single-handed, entered several enemy dugouts and took many prisoners, and during subsequent operations dealt similarly with dugout after dugout, forcing one officer and twenty-five other ranks to surrender. During the consolidation of the first objective he pursued and brought back several of the enemy who were slipping away, and he was also instrumental in rescuing some British soldiers who were being led off as prisoners. Later in the day, when in command of a platoon, he led it with the utmost dash and resource, capturing many prisoners. This very gallant soldier was subsequently killed by a shell.

Unusual that McGuffie's VC award is not inscribed on the memorial given its importance.
A link to his picture and grave photo;
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8043000
His Victoria Cross is displayed at the Regimental Museum of The Kings Own Scottish Borderers
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spoons



Joined: 09 Jan 2007
Posts: 4991
Location: St John's Town of Dalry

PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 11:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

McGuffie also has an individual memorial in Wigtown Town Hall and photographing this is still on my 'to-do' list
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DelBoy



Joined: 12 Jul 2007
Posts: 4858
Location: The County of Angus

PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2011 12:58 am    Post subject: Memorial Transcription Reply with quote

IN PROUD REMEMBRANCE OF
THE MEN
OF THIS BURGH AND PARISH
WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN
THE GREAT WAR 1914 - 1918

John Black
William Black
Robert Boyd
Andrew Briggs
John Briggs
Alexander Broadfoot
Edward Clark
John Coburn
Robert Copland
Thomas Cromie
William Edwards
John Ewing
John Flynn
Edward Hale
James Hargreaves
John Harvey
Adam Horner
Robert Hughes
William Irvine
William Jamieson
David Kellie
Francis Kennedy
Leslie Kennedy
Edward Kilpatrick
William Kilpatrick
David Kiltie
Alexander Knowles
Robert Knowles
Charles Landers
Alexander Laurie
James Loan
James Love
Blain Malone
David Malone
Robert Murray
David McCaskie
Thoma McCaskie
Thomas McCheyne
Ernest McClelland
James McCulloch
Louis McGuffie
Charles McKinna
James McNeil
Joseph McRobert
Hugh Neil
William Paton
Stanley Rolfe
Walter Scott
William Sproul
George Todd
William Walker
Charles Boyd
John Davies
David McMurray

AND IN WORLD WAR 1939 - 1945

Robert Aird
James Clark
Frank Davidson
William George Dodds
Kenneth Drysdale
John ALexander McCulloch
John McEwan
John McHugh
James McMillan
Fraser Nimmo
James Salvona
Robert Douglas Thomson
John Watson


Last edited by DelBoy on Thu May 02, 2013 11:41 am; edited 1 time in total
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Mike Morley



Joined: 17 Apr 2013
Posts: 8641
Location: Roberton, Lanarkshire

PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 7:43 am    Post subject: Wigtown Reply with quote

Over the past few months I've been researching the background to those 54 men who died in World War One and whose names appear on Wigtown War Memorial. I've managed to write up just over half of them so far, ranging from a page to three or four. I hope to be able to use these min-biographies as a resource for use particularly over the next four or five years.

I've just been invited by the local Community Council to do a presentation at their AGM in a couple of weeks time so hope to get some official sanction/impetus behind it.
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Mike Morley



Joined: 17 Apr 2013
Posts: 8641
Location: Roberton, Lanarkshire

PostPosted: Fri Aug 16, 2013 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John Davies, or Davis, is one of three soldiers whose name was added to the War Memorial later. It is likely that he is Driver T/392381 J Davis, of the Royal Army Service Corps who, before the war had lived at 27 High Street, Wigtown. He died on 13 April 1920 at the age of 26.
His death was briefly announced in the Galloway Gazette on 1 May 1920: "At Lichfield on 13th April, Driver John Davis, aged 26, grandson of the late Mr John Adamson, Wigtown."
Driver Davis is buried in the Burntwood Mental Hospital Burial Ground. I do have a photograph of his headstone there obtained from the local history group website.
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Mike Morley



Joined: 17 Apr 2013
Posts: 8641
Location: Roberton, Lanarkshire

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: BLACK, JOHN
Initials: J
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment/Service: Tanks Corps, 6th Bn
Age: 23
Date of Death: 23 August 1918
Additional Information: Son of John Black, (Solicitor and Bank Agent), British Linen Bank, Wigtown, and Sarah Jane (his wife).
Grave Reference: III. B. 18
Cemetery: Bac-du-Sud British Cemetery, Bailleulval

John Black was the elder son of John Black, a Solicitor and Bank Agent, British Linen Bank, Bank Street, Wigtown (now the Wigtown House Hotel and overlooking the War Memorial) and his wife, Sarah Jane. John Black Snr had a wide range of responsibilities in Wigtown: he was Burgh Chamberlain and Harbourmaster, Parish Council Collector, Justice of the Peace, amongst other duties. Ironically, after the war he was a member of the Burgh Committee responsible for the erection of Wigtown War Memorial.
John Jr was educated at the Ewart High School, Newton Stewart, where his name now appears on the school memorial plaque. He played football for Wigtown Utd before moving to Edinburgh and continued his education at Edinburgh Academy. He was afterwards apprenticed to Messrs Tods, Murray & Jamieson, W.S. Edinburgh (a commercial legal firm with offices in Edinburgh and Glasgow to the present day).
John was a Territorial of the 4th Royal Scots (Queen’s Edinburgh) and at the outbreak of war volunteered for foreign service and proceeded with his battalion to Gallipoli in May 1915 afterwards serving in Egypt. He obtained his Commission in January 1917, and was posted to the 6th Battalion, the Tank Corps with which he saw much service. He was wounded at Cambrai around November 1917 and mentioned in despatches in May 1918.
The Tank Corps official history records the action on 23rd August 1918 where John Black was fatally wounded. It states that on that day 6 Whippet Tanks of A Company, under the command of Captain R F Howell were to support the 2nd Division in the capture of Ervillers, Behignes and Sapignies. The Whippets left Monchy-au-Bois at 6am and joined the infantry on the Blue Line at 8.30am. A Company proceeded with the infantry to the starting point. Just before the starting point was reached, Whippet A351, Lt J Black, developed mechanical problems north of Courcelles. Whilst outside trying to repair the Whippet, Lt Black and Batallion Engineer, Capt H Atherton, were wounded by shellfire. Lt Black subsequently died of wounds.


The Galloway Gazette 7 September 1918 reported his death and carried an excerpt from the letter from Lieutenant Black’s Commanding Officer to his father:

It is more than difficult for me to write and tell you that your son, John, has died of wounds. He was in action on the 23rd inst, and wounded. I was not present myself, but from enquiries made I am sure that everything possible was done. No time was lost in getting medical aid, and he was conveyed to hospital immediately. He passed away on the 24th inst. John had been in my section for many months and we have been in several actions together. He was idolised by the men and they were always his first thought. His unselfish and happy disposition won him many friends – he was one of the most popular officers in the Battalion. Through his death we have suffered a great loss – a loss that cannot be replaced – a more gallant officer we have never had. Will you please to convey to Mrs Black and accept yourself my deepest sympathy in your great loss.
Yours very sincerely,

J.A.Renwick (Captain)
August 27 1918.


A photograph of Lt Black was published in the Galloway Gazette:



A memorial inscription to John Black can also be seen on the family headstone in Wigtown Parish Church cemetery. John Black’s Whippet, A351, nicknamed Fanny Adams, was to see further action after the war in Dublin in 1919.
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Kenneth Morrison



Joined: 29 Sep 2008
Posts: 7370
Location: Rockcliffe Dalbeattie

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From Edinburgh University's Roll of the Fallen:

BLACK, JOHN (b. 1894).
Edinburgh Academy. Student of Law, 1913-14.
4th Royal Scots, Private Aug. 1914.
6th Battalion Tank Corps, 2nd Lieut. April 1917; Lieut. 1918.
Gallipoli, Egypt, and France. Dispatches Nov. 1917.
Wounded twice at Cambrai Nov. 1917. Wounded again and died on 23rd August 1918 at Courcelles.

Medal card of Black, John
Corps Regiment No Rank
4th Royal Scots 200133 Private
Machine Gun Corps 200133 Private
Tank Corps Second Lieutenant
_________________
Ken
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Mike Morley



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Posts: 8641
Location: Roberton, Lanarkshire

PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2014 9:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: BLACK, WILLIAM
Initials: W
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Private
Regiment/Service: Royal Scots Fusiliers, 6th/7th Bn
Date of Death: 16 September 1916
Service Number: 22998
Grave Reference: II. C. 16
Cemetery: Dernancourt Communal Cemetery Extension

William Black was born in Wigtown, the son of William Black of Carslae Farm near Wigtown. He was married to Helen and lived near Sorbie. Prior to enlistment he worked at Baldoon. In August 1916 the Galloway Gazette reported that William had been wounded in action and was in hospital. After recovering he returned to duty but was wounded again on 16th September 1916 and, despite being taken to the Casualty Clearing Station, he died of his wounds.
Wigtownshire Free Press (30/8/16): Mrs Black, Milairies, Sorbie, has received official intimation that her husband, Private Wm Black, RSF, was wounded in action and is at present in hospital. Previous to enlistment, he was employed at Baldoon.
The Galloway Gazette (7 October 1916) carried a photograph of Private Black and reported:
On the 16th ult in Casualty Clearing Station, France, died of wounds received in action, Wm Black, son of Wm Black, Carslae, Wigtown and husband of Helen Black, Mill Airies, Sorbie.



Last edited by Mike Morley on Thu Sep 08, 2016 9:53 am; edited 1 time in total
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Mike Morley



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Posts: 8641
Location: Roberton, Lanarkshire

PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2014 9:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: BOYD, CHARLES A
Initials: CA
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment/Service: Cameron Highlanders, 1st Bn
Age: 19
Date of Death: 14 September 1914
Service Number: 9376
Additional Information: Son of Charles and Janet Morris Boyd.
Memorial: La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial

On 7 November 1914 the Galloway Gazette reported: WIGTOWN CORPORAL KILLED IN ACTION
Information has been received in Edinburgh, by his father, of the death of Corporal Charles Boyd of the 1st Cameron Highlanders, who was killed in action on 14th September last. Corporal Boyd was a promising pupil of Wigtown Public School, and when he joined the Cameron Highlanders, three years ago at Edinburgh Castle, his merits were soon recognised, and only a few months elapsed before he was appointed to assistant teacher. Then he was transferred to Blackness Castle in charge of a squad to teach there. By this time he had achieved the rank of Lance Corporal, and on mobilisation he was promoted Corporal. Corporal Boyd was only 20 years of age. His father was for some time a baker in Wigtown.
Note that Charles Boyd is one of three names added after the rest of the World War One casualties.
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Mike Morley



Joined: 17 Apr 2013
Posts: 8641
Location: Roberton, Lanarkshire

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: BOYD, ROBERT
Initials: R
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Private
Regiment/Service: Royal Scots Fusiliers, 2nd Bn
Date of Death: 7 April 1917
Service Number: 34968
Panel Reference: Bay 5
Memorial: Arras Memorial

Robert Boyd enlisted at Whauphill with the 2nd Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers. He was married to Annie Nicholson and lived at 2 North Main Street, Wigtown. The Galloway Gazette (15 September 1917), five months after Robert Boyd’s death, carried a brief report:
On 7 April 1917, killed in action, Private Robert Boyd RSF, beloved husband of Annie Nicholson, 2 North Main Street, Wigtown, aged 38 years.



Last edited by Mike Morley on Wed Aug 03, 2016 12:47 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Mike Morley



Joined: 17 Apr 2013
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Location: Roberton, Lanarkshire

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: BRIGGS, ANDREW
Initials: A
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Private
Regiment/Service: Cameron Highlanders, 6th Bn
Age: 21
Date of Death: 11 April 1917
Service Number: S/40523
Additional Information: Son of Andrew and Jeanie Briggs, of 15, North Main St., Wigtown.
Panel Reference: Bay 9
Memorial: Arras Memorial

Private S/40523 Andrew Briggs was the son of Andrew and Jeannie Briggs of Bladnoch, later 15 North Main Street, Wigtown. He enlisted on 4 January 1916, initially with the Scottish Horse. Shortly after that he joined the Lovat Scouts before ending up in the 6th battalion, Cameron Highlanders. After 9 months of active service Private Briggs was killed in action on 11 April 1917. He was reported missing in action in the Galloway Gazette on 19 May:
Mr & Mrs Briggs, Bladnoch, have received official information that their son, Private Andrew Briggs, who joined the Lovat scouts and was transferred to the Cameron Highlanders, has been posted as missing since April 11. He enlisted on 4th January 1916 and has been 9 months in active service. He is 21 years of age.
It wasn’t until July of that year that Mr & Mrs Briggs received confirmation of his death, at the age of 21.
Whilst carrying out some family history research in Sheffield Central Library I came upon some local histories and biographies of local soldiers who fell in World War One. I was astonished to find that the very first biography I looked at was of Andrew Briggs. He had moved to Sheffield before 1914 to live with his father’s younger brother, John, and his wife, Sarah, at 32 Havelock Street. During the war Andrew moved back to Galloway and enlisted at Newton Stewart.
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Mike Morley



Joined: 17 Apr 2013
Posts: 8641
Location: Roberton, Lanarkshire

PostPosted: Sat Jul 12, 2014 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: BRIGGS, JOHN
Initials: J
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Private
Regiment/Service: Highland Light Infantry, 2nd Bn
Age: 20
Date of Death: 31 October 1914
Additional Information: Son of James Briggs, of 12, High Vennel, Wigtown
Panel Reference: Panel 38
Memorial: Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial

On 5 December 1914 the Galloway Gazette reported that he had been wounded but it wasn’t until 6 March 1915 that it reported:
Mr James Briggs, labourer, Wigtown, has received information from the War Office that his son, Private John Briggs, HLI, died from the effects of wounds at Ypres on 31st October last. He was 21 years of age.

John had an elder brother, who survived the war. He was in the Navy and who also saw action early on in the war as he was a crewman on HMS Aboukir, an outdated armoured cruiser. On 22 September 1914 the Aboukir was on patrol with two similar ships, HMS Cressy and HMS Hogue, when all were sunk by torpedoes fired by a German U-boat with the loss 1,459 men. John Briggs’ brother was one of the 837 men rescued.
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Mike Morley



Joined: 17 Apr 2013
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Location: Roberton, Lanarkshire

PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2014 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Name: BROADFOOT, ALEXANDER
Initials: A
Nationality: Canadian
Rank: Private:
Regiment/Service: Canadian Infantry, 72nd Bn
Awards: MM
Age: 28
Date of Death: 8 November 1917
Additional Information: Son of Alexander and Margaret Broadfoot, of Monreith Village, Portwilliam, Wigtownshire, Scotland.
Grave Reference: XXX. K. 12
Cemetery: Etaples Militray Cemetery

Alexander Broadfoot was born on 11 April 1889 at Horwich, the son of Alexander and Margaret Broadfoot. For five years he worked in William Cook’s grocers shop in Port William and emigrated to Canada in 1913, sailing from Glasgow to Halifax, Nova Scotia. He enlisted on 14 February 1916 at Vancouver. He was awarded the Military Medal for his work as a messenger at Vimy Ridge. One of the most notable actions in the history of the Seaforths was the capture of Crest Farm during the Battle of Passchendaele on 30 October 1917. A dispatch from the Commander-in-Chief, after the battle, stated in part that "the unit which took Crest Farm had by this action accomplished a feat of arms which would go down in the annals of British history as one of the greatest achievements of a single unit." From examining the regimental war diary I believe it is in this action that Alexander Broadfoot received the wounds that led to his death.
On 1 December 1917 the Galloway Gazette reported:

Mrs Turner, Clarksburn, Monreith village, Port William, has received official intimation that her nephew, Private Alexander Broadfoot MM, Seaforth Canadian Highlanders, died of wounds on November 8th. Private Broadfoot was twice mentioned in despatches and at Vimy Ridge he was successful in winning the Military Medal for bravery in the field. Private Broadfoot served five years as a grocer with Wm Cook, Port William and is the second employee to receive the Military Medal. In 1913 Private Broadfoot went to Canada and joined the colours shortly after war broke out. His last leave was in August [the Gazette had reported on 11 August that Alexander was home on leave at his old home, Mrs Turner’s at Clarksburn. It further mentions the award of the MM at the Battle of Vimy Ridge for “some daring work as a runner”.] Most sympathy is felt for his bereaved friends at home and his brother who is on active service at the front. His sister has received the following letter from a chaplain to the forces: It is with sorrow I write to inform you of the death of your brother. He was brought along with many other Canadians to hospital some days ago. I have seen him each day and have tried to keep him cheerful. It was not difficult because he was a brave soul. Each time I came away from his bed I felt more and more glad because he was so certain of the presence of God with him. Yesterday he was exceedingly cheerful, and I had no doubt of his recovery. But he must have had some internal injury, and this morning I stood by his bed and held his hand as he passed into the larger, brighter Blighty, the true Home. God give you all needful grace and strength and comfort.
The following year Mrs Broadfoot received notification that Alexander’s brother, Private W Broadfoot, also serving with the Canadians, had been wounded by gunshot in the right leg and had been transferred to the Norfolk War Hospital.

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